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  #61  
Old Posted May 21, 2012, 4:19 AM
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Snake in the Grass

My boyfriend and I had nothing to do this afternoon after waking up from a nap, and we didn't want to just sit around at home all day. So, on a whim we headed over to the North Carolina Arboretum on the southwest side of Asheville.

There was an especially enlightening exhibit about poisonous and otherwise dangerous plants, but unfortunately we had to rush through it because we got there so late. And on top of all that, I didn't have time to charge my camera battery, which died not long into our visit.

This means I will have to return when I'm better prepared. Thankfully, this place is only about ten minutes away from my apartment so that ought not to be too difficult. I'll be sure to charge the camera next time.

In the meantime...

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This is the Quilt Garden, planted with colorful flowers and plants in patterns that mimic traditional Appalachian quilting patterns.













This leads to the arboretum's bonsai collection, which is one of the best in the South, and among the better collections in the nation. Unfortunately, it was already closed for the day.









There was a wedding going on. If you want to get married outside, Asheville offers a bevy of choices, including here, the botanical gardens, and the gardens at Biltmore Estate.







The arboretum maintains a small sculpture collection. This one is nice, despite his out-of-whack proportions, but my favorite sculpture is a large metal depiction of a black widow spider. It's called "Lover Girl."

























Years ago the arboretum hosted a conference for representatives from botanical gardens and arboretums from around the world. At that conference the North Carolina Arboretum was voted to have the most beautiful natural setting of any such facility in the world.



























Lest we forget that this is an urban issues forum, here are some photos from downtown taken a while back that just didn't fit into any other thread. Might as well use them before they go stale.



















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  #62  
Old Posted Jun 26, 2012, 11:47 PM
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haunted, i absolutely love the photos of the cemetery. beautiful and informative, and, to me, one of the best places to enjoy that wonderful part of america. i own a book dedicated to mausoleums and cemeteries, and these pictures rival many of those in that particular book.

ashville is the perfect area for me, and i want so badly to build my storybook cottage in that area; however, it is not an inexpensive proposition. it is a dream world. the mountains, the rivers, creeks, the architecture---the perfect place. i wanted to be in the upper hudson valley, but i didn't want to leave the south. i love tn, but there is nothing in our state that has all of the elements that are in the ashville area. my friends, who built homes in highlands, think i should build there. no doubt, it is a beautiful place, but i really think ashville is my future home. loved the arboretum photos. lucky folk who have so much beauty around them. great photos and helpful information. one question, do you get around any of the older churches in the area? most that i have had interest in exploring are always locked up tighter than a drum. i would love to see photos, if you happen to have some. even suggestions for those you think are laden w/ stone, stained glass, slate, various hardwoods. i love big organs, too, if you know of any? thanks again, kingchef
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  #63  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2012, 12:59 AM
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one question, do you get around any of the older churches in the area? most that i have had interest in exploring are always locked up tighter than a drum. i would love to see photos, if you happen to have some. even suggestions for those you think are laden w/ stone, stained glass, slate, various hardwoods. i love big organs, too, if you know of any? thanks again, kingchef
Firstly, thanks very much for your compliment and secondly, yes... Asheville is not a cheap place to live, much to the lament of everyone here who knows that fact so well.

On a more pleasant note, yes I do get around to the older churches in the area. I find them to be very peaceful and when life gets stressful, I find churches to be the perfect place to settle in and let the peace cloud over the stress. This morning, in fact, I spent a good hour in the cathedral just praying and thinking and letting myself unwind.

Your best bets for some serious church architecture in Asheville would be First Baptist, First Congregational, Central United Methodist, Grace Episcopal, First Presbyterian, St. Mary's Episcopal, the Cathedral of All Souls, and the Basilica of St. Lawrence. They're all noteworthy for their architecture, and some such as Grace Episcopal, the basilica, the cathedral, First Congregational, and Central United Methodist have dazzling stained glass. For organs, the top three would be the basilica, cathedral, and First Baptist.

Watch this thread... I have three installments planned sometime this summer when I get the time. One of them will be dedicated to churches.
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  #64  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2012, 3:45 AM
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Your best bets for some serious church architecture in Asheville would be First Baptist, First Congregational, Central United Methodist, Grace Episcopal, First Presbyterian, St. Mary's Episcopal, the Cathedral of All Souls, and the Basilica of St. Lawrence. They're all noteworthy for their architecture, and some such as Grace Episcopal, the basilica, the cathedral, First Congregational, and Central United Methodist have dazzling stained glass. For organs, the top three would be the basilica, cathedral, and First Baptist.

Watch this thread... I have three installments planned sometime this summer when I get the time. One of them will be dedicated to churches.
Its been a few years since I've been to Asheville, but the church architecture was very nice. Asheville all around is just an awesome place, one that I love the way it is, and want it to stay exactly the way it is, but I would also love to see more urban development; if that makes sense. Anyways, looking forward to your future installments!
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  #65  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2012, 6:06 AM
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Its been a few years since I've been to Asheville, but the church architecture was very nice. Asheville all around is just an awesome place, one that I love the way it is, and want it to stay exactly the way it is, but I would also love to see more urban development; if that makes sense. Anyways, looking forward to your future installments!
A lot of people here would agree with you in keeping Asheville exactly as it is. As a resident who has struggled to stay here, because we're the most expensive city in the state in which to live, I wish more people were concerned with making the city better rather than thinking it's fine as it is and must not change. If done right, urban growth would be an enormous asset to this city. As far as I see it, a good growth pattern would also help to bring good jobs to town that would make it easier for those of who want to stay here to do so. In other words -- and to simplify it -- I'd love to fill in all those parking lots holes in our urban fabric, and redevelop all the low-slung 1960's vintage crap downtown with some serious office tower and mixed-use development, then fill it all with the kinds of jobs our young people leave the city and go to Charlotte or Raleigh to find.

I think a lot of it comes down to the fact that I was born and raised here, and can imagine a better Asheville, while so many others moved here from elsewhere because it was paradise compared to what they left. Those people are the ones who don't want anything to change. Seriously. There's a supposed "slow growth" advocacy group (actually a no growth advocacy group) here called P.A.R.C -- People Advocating Real Conservancy -- who went so far as to protest the renovation of an undistinguished 1960's postmodern midrise downtown. They were really that opposed to change of any kind. Our NIMBY's are gem-quality, and could stand proudly beside those of San Francisco.
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  #66  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2012, 5:23 AM
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you are very kind to answer my questions. i am from the roman church, reared, schooled, the whole nine yards. then, before college joined maternal grandparents in their cradle episcopalian ways. i didn't remember a basicila, nor two episcopal churches. i know that there are several beautiful beaux revival buildings, i have a listing of all of the stained glass of the louis t. comfort tiffany shop, the places, names of the windows, scenes, cities, etc. (even cemeteries w/ comfort and lafarge, as well as others, who have glass in the private and public mausoleums. gives the states, and it has been a valuable asset to my travels.

of course, i know asheville has the nickname of ""the san francisco of the south." being a well know area for artists in residence for so many mediums, i found it strange that it was so expensive to live there. isn't tourism a huge part of the area economy? hardwood timber, logging, and planting nurseries?
it is the small nuances that set the community apart from other cities---big and small. you have so much for which to be thankful. w/ the eye you have for detail in many of the photos, you capture much of the spirit of the area. to be honest, i haven't done any home work on wiki or google, etc., but i think that the french broad river is near to that area, is it not?

well, just wanted to tell you that i would be looking for the churches thread. particularly, in the episcopal churches, would you try to get pictures of the rood beams, rood screens, the organ console, and the bell tower?

believe it or not, in a county of over a million people, it is difficult to find good subjects to discuss, though some of the finest buildings in the city and county never make it on any forum. you are a good representative for your city and for nc. best of luck. kingfish
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  #67  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2012, 7:06 AM
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of course, i know asheville has the nickname of ""the san francisco of the south." being a well know area for artists in residence for so many mediums, i found it strange that it was so expensive to live there. isn't tourism a huge part of the area economy? hardwood timber, logging, and planting nurseries?
it is the small nuances that set the community apart from other cities---big and small. you have so much for which to be thankful. w/ the eye you have for detail in many of the photos, you capture much of the spirit of the area. to be honest, i haven't done any home work on wiki or google, etc., but i think that the french broad river is near to that area, is it not?
Tourism is an enormous part of the local economy of Asheville, along with art (much of which is commissioned by buyers from outside the area), retail, healthcare, manufacturing and distribution. We're also making a name for ourselves in brewing. We already have about a dozen distilleries or breweries with more coming, including some big names such as New Belgium, which will locate in the River District, and Sierra Nevada, which is locating in the nearby town of Mills River. New Belgium in particular is expected to set the River District on fire in terms of renovation and development. The lot of them are also expected to attract other industries to help service the brewing interests. The latest one that I heard of was the expansion of a glass factory that provides bottles to some of the breweries.

Now, why did we attract the breweries? Our water. Supposedly it's some of the best in the country, and speaking of water, yes the French Broad River flows right through town.

To answer your other question, logging isn't a very large part of the economy, although it's present. There are a few nurseries and greenhouses, but we're not known for them.

Finally, thanks for your compliments. I'll do what I can to really capture the churches, but that will come down to who has their doors unlocked. Although, now that I think of it I did manage to capture some pictures of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in this thread from a couple of years ago. St. Mary's is located north of downtown in the Grove Park neighborhood.
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Old Posted Jun 28, 2012, 1:35 PM
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i'll be there tomorrow!

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  #69  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2012, 4:57 AM
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And being a retirement destination for wealthy northerners is the reason housing prices are so high. I think most towns in WNC have made attracting wealthy and conservative retirees their goal for growing the tax base and creating jobs, ..instead of actually building needed industrial and office parks. When I was still in Asheville (southwestern suburbs), I would wake up in the morning to hammering and trucks echoing through the valley. Drive to the top of the road and a sign reading "New Homes: 700's" would greet me. The $700,000 house is usually the smallest home and actually cost $799,000. The others were likely closer to $1 million. Employment is mostly hospitality, retail and healthcare. Years ago, it was paper and textile mills. I moved to Atlanta after graduating from college and I've found very few people from Asheville move here. The reaction to telling someone in Atlanta you're from Asheville is usually a discussion on their visit to Biltmore (hospitality industry). Often times they think I said Nashville (TN) and I have to repeat Asheville.

I love my hometown. I miss the food, friends, architecture, mountains and so many more things. I moved to Atlanta for a good job, cheap housing, the amazing skyline and the chance to live in a big city. I would love to move back someday and yes, if you love beer, Asheville is a must visit. Asheville has more breweries than Charlotte or Raleigh. Both the small and national breweries have operations in Asheville.
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Old Posted Jun 30, 2012, 12:34 AM
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north carolina is projected to continue growth over the next 10 years, although i believe it, along w/ the rest of the south is expected to slow some. the northeast is expected to regain some growth momentum; however, those retirees coming from the north, who have the kind of incomes to purchase such houses in closed communities, won't, in majority, keep a second house, as was the practice until the late 80's. the wealth is just not there. old wealth will continue to furnish some inheritance homes, but, imo, those days of summer and winter homes---possiblely a third home internationally---are pretty much over for our generation onward.

enclaves such as the highlands, the wilmington-wrightsville beach area, and many others pull in high dollar retirees, unlike sister states such as tn, kentucky, and the like. tn gets several retirees in east tn, but they can hurt local economies because of infrastructure use, but relatively low tax contributions, generally speaking. other advantages that north carolina has over tn, ky, and some others is their coastline. they have mountains, golf courses, good retirement advertisement to keep those who retire in the state and those looking for a retirement settlement. also, nc has high dollar retirees coming from the banking, commerce, insurance, healthcare, and biomedicine communities. advanced economic drivers that will help settle those retiring. nc has done well for herself, and is probably a good 15 to 20 years ahead of southern states surrounding it. i think charlotte's heyday growth is coming to an end, and that rate will begin to fall w/in a moderate growth rate. still, north carolina is my bet for overall desirability for living in retirement and certainly for working families. this, although i am generally skeptical about giving too much credit to public school systems, seems to be a state that has educated many of its own, and has enjoyed the influx of the highly educated from other states. again, however, certain high dollar sectors of the economy have shaken the area for a good while, now.

Last edited by kingchef; Jun 30, 2012 at 12:45 AM.
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Old Posted Jun 30, 2012, 6:36 PM
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Hot n' Gritty

As I sit here in the air-conditioned comfort of my kitchen, listening to youtube music while I post these pictures, it's 93F outside. The heat index makes it feel like 96. This is why I joined fellow SSP forumer LSyd much earlier today, and he, myself, and my boyfriend ran around downtown Asheville taking pictures while the day was still merely uncomfortable and not yet unbearable.

I regret to inform you that there are no photographs of LSyd because he is a vampire and is therefore incapable of being captured by a camera. Likewise there are no photographs of my boyfriend because he has developed cat-like reflexes and can get his hand up to block the shot nine times out of ten.

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We had arranged to meet in Pack Square by the bronze pigs, and if you think about it, "Meet me at the pigs," is just not something you get to hear someone say very often.





The pigs are very popular for posing.



And once they're posed on the pigs, you take their pictures.



There is a certain irony to a person a jogging past a cupcake bakery.







































































































Don't you wish you were the donut queen?













Someone had abandoned their egg drop soup, and for good reason. Egg drop soup is revolting.



Considering my and LSyd's predilection for grit, I figured it would be a good idea to visit downtown's largest respository of such: an alley called Carolina Lane with a smaller alley called Chicken Alley branching off it. The only better place to see graffiti in Asheville is the River District with its derelict factories and warehouses.





























In case there was some dispute about the matter:










































































































Tourists in their natural habitat.











Even in the heart of downtown, you're not far from the natural charms of the city.











Goodbye and thank you for visiting. Please exit to your left.

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Old Posted Jul 1, 2012, 2:24 AM
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i'm having a flashback. awesome shots, and thanks for the tour.

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  #73  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2012, 2:49 AM
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i'm having a flashback. awesome shots, and thanks for the tour.

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Couldn't have done it without you. I was pleasantly surprised at how they came out. Thanks for stopping by.
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  #74  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2012, 1:13 AM
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As I have said numerous times, I must get down there. Such a lovely city & setting.
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  #75  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2012, 12:41 PM
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So many great photos. thanks for sharing.

What's under construction?
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  #76  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2012, 2:36 AM
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Thanks, Expat. I'm glad you stopped in to take a look. You know you're welcome down here any time at all.

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So many great photos. thanks for sharing.

What's under construction?
Thanks for the compliment!

In the earlier pictures, it was a "life services" tower at the courthouse. The Buncombe County Courthouse was built in the 1920's and wasn't anywhere near up to current standards when it came to elevators, restrooms, and ease of escape during a fire. It was so bad, in fact, that missing the elevator and having to wait for another was considered a valid excuse for showing up late to court. Also, because the upper floors -- which used to house the county jail -- weren't up to modern standards, they couldn't be used. Then along came the tower with more elevators, bathrooms, and stairwells and that opened up the upper floors once more. They've been converted to county office space.

Meanwhile, now that the tower is complete, construction has begun on a new addition to the courthouse. It will be five stories tall and will contain several more courtrooms to ease overcrowding in the historic courthouse.
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Old Posted Oct 22, 2012, 4:18 AM
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My plan yesterday was to go out and...



...But this turned out to be more difficult than one might imagine because there is just so very much art in downtown Asheville. I didn't realize just how much there was, in fact, until I tried to go around and capture it all. My boyfriend and I spent about three hours walking around trying to get it all and still didn't manage to get everything. I know I missed a few things, and as a result I've even had to recycle a few pictures to show you what I know that I missed. I do hope you'll be forgiving.

By the end of it, I was experiencing art fatigue, and I've only had that happen to me once before. It occurred when I went to Seattle and spent so much time wandering around museums that if I had to go look at one more beautiful object I was going to run screaming into the street -- but that wouldn't have helped yesterday because all of this art was out on the street. There was no escape.

So very, very much art.

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We couldn't park downtown because of a giant craft show going on at the civic center, plus hordes of tourists out enjoying the pleasant fall weather. We had to park in Montford, north of downtown and walk in.

This mural decorates the side of an old Piggly Wiggly grocery store that now houses a convenience store and a couple of restaurants.









Just across I-240 from downtown, this mural adorns the side of a clothing and sporting goods store.



Meanwhile, downtown, the gardens in front of the Basilica of St. Lawrence are lovely in any season. We couldn't go inside the church because a wedding was going on, and that was a shame. The basilica is arguably Asheville's grandest church and is absolutely filled with art -- including German stained glass windows, a 17th Century altarpiece purchased from a Spanish cathedral, paintings from the 1700's, and statues and tilework from the 1300's.







Here are a couple of old photos I've taken in the church to give you an idea of what sorts of lovely things lurk inside.





Out behind the church stands a monument to aborted children.







En route to downtown, this tile is set into the sidewalk in front of the Kress Building. Tiles just like this decorate the building. Asheville's architecture is one of its best features, and in recognition of that fact there are several works of art downtown that either echo or draw attention to various architectural features.



That's Pack Square up there. It's where Asheville was founded at the crossing of two Indian trading paths, and it's where the beating heart of the city has been located ever since. One of Pack Square's most noteworthy features is the Vance Monument obelisk, which honors the Civil War-era governor of North Carolina. Zebulon Baird Vance was born near Asheville and went on to distinguish himself as, strangely, both a virulent racist and a staunch advocate of tolerance for Jews.



This restaurant features some art on its windows in this picture I took back in June.



An artwork depicts a bit of Asheville history. As the physical heart of town, people have always passed back and forth through Pack Square. In the town's early years, drovers also used to drive enormous herds of animals, including pigs and turkeys, through the square.





An artwork decorates the outside of the Asheville Art Museum.



This staid memorial to author Thomas Wolfe was commissioned in retaliation of the city's first purchase of a piece of public art back in the 80's. The city bought a piece of modern art and a group of citizens found it distasteful. They commissioned this angel, a very bad copy of the marble angel that inspired the title of one of Wolfe's most famous books, as a counterpoint to the modern art.



A better view of the Vance Monument.



In Asheville you may experience art in many different ways. Here at the art museum you may pay to view it.



Away from the square, this bronze top hat, cane, and gloves mark the site where the opera house used to stand. It's a parking lot now.



So many buildings are so richly adorned.



This artwork honors short story writer William Porter (alias O. Henry) who lived and worked in Asheville for a time. Porter is buried here.



Down on Church Street, the churches boast peaceful courtyards, some with fountains.

This is the remembrance garden at Central United Methodist.







First Presbyterian sprouts strange flowers.





And a remembrance garden of its own.



A lovely gate at Grace Episcopal, which also boasts some significant stained glass windows. What makes them significant is that they were created by Mary Tillinghast, a female contemporary of Louis Comfort Tiffany.





A mural decorates the side of the Craggie Brewing Company.











Ornate stonework on the Drhumor Building.



The artist who created these lovely carvings had a sense of humor. That face up there is a depiction of a florist who had a shop across the street, who liked to stand in this doorway and watch the stone carver at work.



The monument to Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman awarded a medical degree in the United States, who began her medical studies while working as a music teacher in Asheville.



This artwork draws attention to a nearby Art Deco masterpiece.



This is the Art Deco masterpiece to which the artwork draws attention.



A market was set up in Pritchard Park. What could you buy there? Art -- what a surprise!



This artwork stands on the other side of the park, and is a modernistic portrayal of some of the Art Deco decorations on nearby buildings. I took this picture in November a couple of years ago.



You may listen to art, if you wish...



This large flatiron draws attention to two things: the Flat Iron Building at whose base it stands, and the old flatirons used in the Asheville Laundry that once stood nearby. The iron is very popular with buskers.



A pottery shop on Wall Street boasts a very artistic awning.



One of the winged rams atop the Public Service Building.



A caravan compels you to buy beads.



More buskers...



A sculpture group makes note of another quirk of Asheville history. Wall Street takes its name from the wall built to hold back Battery Hill, and catwalks once connected the first floors of buildings on side of the hill to the second floors of buildings built at the base of the hill. Eventually, the gap between the two was filled in and Wall Street was born.

Catwalks, hence "Cat Walk."







The cats' attention is rapt on a couple of bronze rats. Why? Because the alley that runs underneath Wall Street is known as Rat Alley.





Other cities have yarn bombers, and while we have them too, we also have the flower bomber who leaves hapless trees and sculptures draped in chains of flowers under cover of darkness. This is what remains of her attack on a Wall Street gingko tree.



A last look up at the Public Service Building.



Up by the Grove Arcade, the city's loveliest shopping mall, this sculpture notes the fact that the Grove Arcade was originally planned to have a tower atop it.



Inside the arcade. All of that stonework is handcarved.



The building is decorated inside and out with dozens of carved faces, no two of which are exactly alike.







A bronze replica of the registration book from the old Battery Park Hotel (as well as its "new" incarnation) records some of the famous signatures collected by those hotels over the years.



The "new" Battery Park Hotel still stands, and is now an apartment building.







More stonework at the Grove Arcade.









A sculpture group outside the civic center (recently renamed the U.S. Cellular Center) honors Asheville's long history as a center for music and dance. Asheville has been a resort city practically since its founding, and dances and concerts were held by the hotels to entertain their guests.









There was also a saxophonist entertaining the crowds coming and going from the big craft show inside.



A blacksmithing demonstration outside the U.S. Cellular Center. You may watch art being made, if you like.



Bronze ivy marks the old Ivey's Department Store building. It's an upscale boutique hotel with shops on the first floor now.



Speaking of department stores, Haywood Street used to be lined with them from end to end. These bronze shoppers note Haywood's history as the city's prime shopping street.







Over on Lexington Avenue the art is a little earthier. Here's a depiction of Chik-Fil-A Chief Operating Officer Dan Cathy as the famous drag queen Divine. The artist didn't care for Cathy's stance on same-sex relationships.



Yet another Lexington mural, photographed back in June.





Turns out that behind this door is the Static Age music store. The door was up, so here's a picture from June showing the door in all its glory.



You've seen these murals under the I-240 overpass before because they're perhaps my favorite works of art downtown. I can't help myself.





















On the other side of the overpass lies the Moog synthesizer factory.





And back under the overpass we go.















Chicken Alley, naturally.

























An artist at work up past the point where Chicken Alley hooks around to connect with Carolina Lane.

















A bronze basket of apples and bonnet on a bench near the corner of Walnut and Lexington. It honors the farmers who once brought their goods to town to sell them.





A bronze boy on stilts on Broadway. Somehow, this is supposed to honor the architect who designed the biggest house in America, which stands a few miles south of downtown Asheville.



The yarn bombers have been here, I see.





Mural on Broadway.



A ceramic depiction of the Woodfin House that once stood on Woodfin Street.



Thomas Wolfe grew up in this neighborhood and the forced perspective of this artwork shows what the area would have looked like when Wolfe was growing up.











Up at the Thomas Wolfe House there's a pair of -- very large -- bronze shoes in Wolfe's size.



Sculptures on the side of the Asheville Community Theatre. You may watch art being performed if you like, and I did just that when I attended a performance of Hairspray here a few weeks ago. Theatre thrives here.







An artwork depicts the various ways that travelers have come to Asheville over the years, from canoe to bicycle, horse, train, and plane.







An impromptu concert featuring piano, tuba, and trumpet near the corner of Broadway and Walnut.







Remember that angel? This is the artwork, called "Continuum" that pissed people off enough to buy it. It stands on a little scrap of lawn in front of a county office building.



Here's a lovely garden with a depressing purpose...







Why is it depressing? This is being built for the Department of Social Services and will serve as a peaceful, pretty place for children to meet with their caseworkers and talk about daddy touching them.





The Confederate memorial, tucked away under a tree beside the courthouse.



Art decorates the city's central park, including this performance stage that stretches before the courthouse and city hall.



The veterans' memorial.







This shows how the city hall and county courthouse were originally supposed to look. When the county got a look at city hall's design, they found it far too daring and hired another firm to design a reserved neoclassical tower instead.









This marks the spot where Thomas Wolfe's father once ran a gravestone shop.







Even more art for sale in Pack Square.









This sculpture honors a downtown neighborhood called The Block, which was once the commercial heart of Asheville's black community. Today, decades after urban renewal devastated the area, The Block is the last part of downtown that still awaits revitalization.



Change is afoot in The Block. This building, for instance, is one of a group that will be refurbished as part of a project that will include new commercial and office space, as well as almost 70 desperately-needed units of affordable housing.







Elsewhere, in a little scrap of green space called Triangle Park, this amazing mural depicts the long and storied history of Asheville African-American community.





The neighborhood that once supplied The Block with customers was called the East End. Here's how it looked in 1891. It was largely destroyed thanks to urban "renewal" in the 1960's.









The mural is still a work in progress.

















You can sit in the dark and watch art here, if you want to.



A bronze eagle marks the site of the Eagle Hotel, from which nearby Eagle Street (main street of The Block) takes its name.



More buskers!



And now a bit of performance art. That is, in fact, a man dressed as a nun riding a tall bike.



Here he comes...



...And there he goes.



Edit: I told you I knew I'd forgotten some art. Here's one of the works I missed. This iron tree, pictured a few years ago, stands outside the Federal Building.

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"Asheville air affects me like champagne; it goes to my head. I'm apt to do things for which I will be sorry in the grim dawn of New York." -- William G. Raoul, 1898

Last edited by hauntedheadnc; Oct 22, 2012 at 12:46 PM.
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The Flagstaff of North Carolina

Love this town, seriously. Need to get out there sometime
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Old Posted Oct 22, 2012, 5:53 AM
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The Flagstaff of North Carolina

Love this town, seriously. Need to get out there sometime
By all means... Come on out. Give me advance notice and I'd be happy togive you the grand tour.
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