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  #941  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2011, 8:38 PM
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Fair enough--I find it primarily interesting because it's a small business that creates 15 local jobs that working-class folks in Alkali Flat could get.

There are certain advantages to Doughbot being all the way down at the edge of Southside--makes it a longer bike ride to pick up the donuts, thus you get a bit of exercise to work off the calories (and sugar high) from the donuts! Although since there is already a bakery at 12th and F, and another one opening at 9th and K, there's plenty of sugar-bomb options on that end of town.
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  #942  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2011, 9:03 PM
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haha, I think you are right about this one.


So, Willy, do you have any inside scoops on any cool upcoming projects that you think I or any of us would get a kick out of?
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  #943  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2011, 6:30 AM
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Has anybody else seen the new neon they put up on Tower Theater? The marquee is still down, but the new letters on the tower itself are red. Still lights up green at night, thankfully, but the red is just hideous in the daytime. The new owners have ruined the look, the soul of Tower for me.
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  #944  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2011, 7:33 PM
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Looks like more small-business companies are heading to Sacramento--and if you didn't think the cracker company in Alkali Flat was all that exciting, here are three media/creative-class type businesses moving to Old Sacramento!
Quote:
Bob Shallit: Trio of cool companies pick Old Sacramento site for headquarters

By Bob Shallit
bshallit@sacbee.com
Published: Saturday, Dec. 17, 2011 - 12:00 am | Page 1B

Three hip and visionary local companies have selected an unlikely place for their new headquarters operations: Old Sacramento.

Digital ad firm BKWLD, music website developer Ground(ctrl) and recording artist management firm Artery Foundation are taking over two floors of the Ebner Hotel, the recently rebuilt replica of two Gold Rush-era buildings.

The first floor of the K Street structure was occupied more than a year ago by a housewares boutique.

Now, almost all of the remainder of the building is being claimed by three cutting-edge firms – all with growing national profiles.

"They're going to have this fun compound where everybody can synergize and be creative together," says Aaron Marchand, a Turton Commercial broker who handled the lease deal involving about 10,000 square feet of space.

Ryan Vanni, founder of BKWLD and Ground(ctrl), says he and Artery Foundation founder Eric Rushing were each looking to relocate from downtown sites. Then they learned about the Ebner site and figured they ought to be in the same location.

Vanni knows "there's a sense of oddity" about setting up national headquarters in a tourist district.

But, he says, doing the unexpected "fits our culture."

Besides, Vanni says his 50 or so local employees love having restaurants, museums and shops around the offices they'll be occupying in a few months.

"It's like working in Disneyland," he says. "Who wouldn't want to do that?"

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/2011/12/17/412...#ixzz1gp2HpIx3
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  #945  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 3:53 PM
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This is quite the economic recovery with record high vacancy rates....


Sacramento area office vacancies hit a record high

http://www.sacbee.com/2012/04/28/444...vacancies.html

Saturday, Apr. 28, 2012

The Sacramento region office vacancy rate increased in this year's first quarter to an all-time high of 23.74 percent, according to commercial real estate brokerage firm Cornish & Carey Commercial Newmark Knight Frank.

The rate increased 0.36 percent from the previous quarter, reflecting 366,000 square feet of additional vacant space in the region's 22 office submarkets.

In all, vacant office space in the region totals nearly 16 million square feet.

"The market continues in correction mode based on the lack of job growth in the region," said John Frisch, regional managing director for the company. "However, there are signs of life on the horizon with local expansions by Dignity Health and Vision Service Plan.

" … We expect the office market to get better as the year unfolds."
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  #946  
Old Posted May 3, 2012, 5:16 PM
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Meanwhile vr's in San Francisco have dropped dramatically. So recovery is not equally experienced. It never has been. Even during the boom times many rust belt cities continued to decline. Sacramentans have relied way too much on state government and spill-over from Silicon Valley instead of aggressively seeking to diversify their economy. We need a socially progressive business-minded leader (like Bloomberg) not some half-witted local sports hero turned political hack and a bunch of second-rate bureaucrats who are more satisfied with the process than they are with actual progress.
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  #947  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2012, 5:50 AM
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Hi all! Thought some of you would be interested in checking out the student architecture projects that will be on exhibit at Launch this coming week! Personally I'm really looking forward to the fashion show on Friday night. If you haven't seen the list of events for Launch, check it out! www.launchsacramento.com

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  #948  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2013, 6:09 PM
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This thread has been so quiet for so long

Seems like there is still stuff going on--from new housing in midtown to numerous new restuarants/bars that appear to being doing well. I also enjoy the themed weeks (baconfest a few weeks ago to beer week currently).

Thoughts? Anything else going on? Lets bring this back! Haha
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  #949  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2013, 1:37 AM
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Maybe there are just a lot of other forums for this sort of thing...I do see a whole lot of infill housing projects going up, and new restaurants and stores opening up constantly, and the never-ending cavalcade of festival weeks. More live music at more venues, more bikes and pedestrians on the street, more long-vacant or poorly-maintained buildings getting inhabited and fixed up. Lots of things going on all over, but people just post here less about it, maybe migrated to social media or other forums.
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  #950  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2013, 6:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanadvocate View Post
This thread has been so quiet for so long

Seems like there is still stuff going on--from new housing in midtown to numerous new restuarants/bars that appear to being doing well. I also enjoy the themed weeks (baconfest a few weeks ago to beer week currently).

Thoughts? Anything else going on? Lets bring this back! Haha
This is also a website that thrives on actual plans being push through the
commissions which has seen very little activity for several years now. If you
go to the Cities Legislative Body Public Meetings agenda page for upcoming
meetings and check the Planning and Design Commission link, you will see
that very little activity for future developments is actually going on. That in
and of its self is a true indicator as to if the market is improving or if an
projects are in the pipeline. Right now the agendas look pretty empty.
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  #951  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2013, 6:28 AM
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Actually there are a lot of projects that don't get commission review--as part of the switch a few years back from Design Review & Preservation Board to separate Design and Preservation Commissions, more decisions were moved to director or staff level. When Design Review was combined with Planning to create the Planning & Design Commission, more decisions were moved from commission level to staff or director level. And the new zoning code will move even more projects to below the threshold requiring commission review. So only the most major projects will go to commission review--and those have been on an uptick, after a couple of years when half the meetings would be cancelled because there weren't enough commission-level projects.

It seems like there are a lot of things going on right now--just not a lot of the high-rise, high-profile variety that gets the most attention here. Projects that stalled because of the recession have restarted, major policy changes are taking place (like the aforementioned zoning code changes, and parking regulation changes) and there is more pedestrian/bike activity, more often, than I have seen in the central city in the past 20 years. Heck, if we keep this up we'll be well on our way to getting back to the central city population we had in 1950!
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  #952  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2013, 7:01 AM
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What was that population, or the highest population the central city did ever have? What is it estimated at currently?
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  #953  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2013, 8:12 PM
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Originally Posted by ltsmotorsport View Post
What was that population, or the highest population the central city did ever have? What is it estimated at currently?
In 1950, the central city (the "grid" from the river to Alhambra, and the B Street railroad tracks to Broadway) had a population of 58,000. By 1970, it had dropped to 28,000. It bumped back up to 32,000 around 1990 and was around 31,000 as of the 2010 census. Most of that population was lost from what is now Capitol Mall and the central business district.
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  #954  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2013, 5:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
In 1950, the central city (the "grid" from the river to Alhambra, and the B Street railroad tracks to Broadway) had a population of 58,000. By 1970, it had dropped to 28,000. It bumped back up to 32,000 around 1990 and was around 31,000 as of the 2010 census. Most of that population was lost from what is now Capitol Mall and the central business district.
That's interesting. Basically we've lost half the population. I wonder why our so-called leaders never talk about repopulating the core, using real numbers? Why not make it our city's declared goal to double the core's population in say 10-20 years? Other cities have done it.
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  #955  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2013, 8:11 PM
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That's interesting. Basically we've lost half the population. I wonder why our so-called leaders never talk about repopulating the core, using real numbers? Why not make it our city's declared goal to double the core's population in say 10-20 years? Other cities have done it.
It is--the city's 2030 general plan housing element includes adding around 10,000-15,000 units of housing to the central city, primarily in the Railyards, the Docks, River District, R Street Corridor and other opportunity sites. Councilmember Hansen mentioned the halving of the central city's population at the grand opening of the "WAL" (the warehouse lofts on R Street that just broke ground) and I commented afterward that all we need is a couple hundred more projects of equal size and we'd be getting somewhere!
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  #956  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2013, 6:40 PM
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Hello everyone. It's been awhile. Good to see so many of you are... well, still being yourselves. After a brutal couple of years, things seem to be on the rebound. Sorry to see so little activity here tho. Is there another forum or site where you all hang now?

Development in San Diego is building momentum in a way I hope Sacramento will soon. I am working on several projects throughout the area and can tell you the Development Services Department in downtown San Diego is nearly as busy today was it was in 2006. Given the last few years and the continued bleak outlook at the start of 2012, that's amazing.

But there are some lessons that could apply to Sacramento now, especially with the arena possibilities.

San Diego, with all of it's physical blessings, still had a largely decrepit downtown well into the 1980s. That changed in 1987 with the opening of the waterfront convention center. With thousands of conventioneers pouring into downtown several nights a week, local restaurants, clubs and pubs began opening to serve them. These business's didn't have to rely strictly on the neighborhood population to thrive. Unless you already have existing huge densities, this is critical. And these millions of dollars generated by these visitors provided a revenue stream to the city that simply would not have been there otherwise.

But as more began to open, that magical critical mass was reached and local residents so enjoyed the lifestyle and energy, they grew tired of having to drive to be a part of it and began to seek homes closer to the action.

This trend was recharged once again when Petco Park opened with 30k flooding downtown San Diego streets 81 times a year.

The take-away here is that catalyst development works. San Diego's downtown, with these two energy drivers, is now among the most vibrant and exciting in the nation. Of course other factors are involved, but this is the most obvious (and rightly so) link.

My own firm is working on a possible 24-story apartment project in an area of Downtown San Diego I would have never thought feasible. The spill-over from the convention center and Petco has now made even these areas of downtown desirable (a block away there is a 600 unit apartment highrise and two blocks away a 900+ unit highrise was just approved.).

At this point in the development cycle, it will be difficult for Downtown Sacramento to reignite without some type of catalyst to draw people there first. As we have learned from the San Diego experience, this type of development helps create and sustain an attractive and active lifestyle that some locals will want to be a part of. And that's really how it begins.

An arena, especially in Downtown Plaza, would fill this role perfectly.
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  #957  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2013, 3:55 AM
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I'm sure a lot of the stalled projects right now, K Street ones in particular, are pulling hard for the arena to come through as it will absolutely be a game-changer for the area with the amount of people it will attract to events all year long.
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  #958  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 5:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
It is--the city's 2030 general plan housing element includes adding around 10,000-15,000 units of housing to the central city, primarily in the Railyards, the Docks, River District, R Street Corridor and other opportunity sites. Councilmember Hansen mentioned the halving of the central city's population at the grand opening of the "WAL" (the warehouse lofts on R Street that just broke ground) and I commented afterward that all we need is a couple hundred more projects of equal size and we'd be getting somewhere!
That's all great but general plans are barely worth the paper they're written on and 15K is still too little. As giddy as I'm about those far-into-the-future/pie-in-the-sky projects IMHO we need a new vision for the central city and a plan of action that is actively promoted by the mayor and city manager. There's a ton of spaces ripe for in-fill. We could start by disincentivizing surface parking lots through taxation and abolishing any required parking standards for new construction.
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Last edited by ozone; Mar 9, 2013 at 8:30 PM.
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  #959  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2013, 11:16 PM
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That's all great but general plans are barely worth the paper they're written on and 15K is still too little. As giddy as I'm about those far-into-the-future/pie-in-the-sky projects IMHO we need a new vision for the central city and a plan of action that is actively promoted by the mayor and city manager. There's a ton of spaces ripe for in-fill. We could start by disincentivizing surface parking lots through taxation and abolishing any required parking standards for new construction.
Done and done! The city revised its regulations for parking lots a couple of years ago--it's now very hard to build a new parking lot. And a new parking standards ordinance went into effect the beginning of this year--in the central business district, you don't need to provide any parking at all for most projects, and in the rest of Midtown, parking requirements have been greatly reduced. New zoning codes are about to go into effect that increase densities, simplify processes, and (my favorite part) include density bonuses and code incentives for conversion of historic commercial buildings to residential use or mixed use.

10-15K residential units equals more like 15,000-30,000 people (assuming 1.5-2 people per residential unit) which would make up that 1950 population deficit. The nice thing about the current plan is that there are already plans on the books for the Railyards and Richards, the Docks and R Street--instead of having to invent something new and drive it through the approval process, the framework is there for a lot of central city growth.

But getting there takes more than just codes, and more than just "vision." It also requires reining in suburban sprawl and unlimited horizontal growth. If it's cheaper, easier and more profitable to build suburbs on farmland, that's what they will do, especially if there are still structural incentives like new freeway construction that drive growth outward.
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  #960  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2013, 10:34 PM
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Anybody know whats going on with construction in Township 9? It seems like there's a lot of tractors and graded dirt but I haven't seen any concrete or rebar go up yet.
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