HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Atlantic Provinces > Halifax > Transportation & Infrastructure

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1061  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2015, 2:37 AM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 17,965
Here's a proposal for a ~$1B LRT system for London, Ontario: https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.ne...PDF?1446664366

The municipality is already in talks with the province and the federal government seems likely to kick in money too. The municipal contribution is only in the $100-200M range.

London and Halifax are about the same size but Halifax traffic seems worse, probably because it's an older city with more challenging geography.

Kitchener-Waterloo already has an LRT system under construction. I think Hamilton might be getting LRT too.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1062  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2015, 2:41 AM
Hali87's Avatar
Hali87 Hali87 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 2,781
Hamilton is as well. So are Mississauga-Brampton (actually Brampton turned down a bunch of provincial funding because the city wanted to re-align part of the route, but I think part of it is still being built as proposed). I think York Region also implemented a large-scale BRT system recently.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1063  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2015, 3:44 PM
MalcolmTucker's Avatar
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 9,707
The only problem you can see with the proposal is cost versus benefit, though that didn't stop Waterloo from going forward with even worse results. Looking at the numbers, I think they end up with BRT.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1064  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2015, 6:11 PM
Drybrain Drybrain is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,993
Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
Here's a proposal for a ~$1B LRT system for London, Ontario: https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.ne...PDF?1446664366

The municipality is already in talks with the province and the federal government seems likely to kick in money too. The municipal contribution is only in the $100-200M range.

London and Halifax are about the same size but Halifax traffic seems worse, probably because it's an older city with more challenging geography.

Kitchener-Waterloo already has an LRT system under construction. I think Hamilton might be getting LRT too.
Seriously, if London gets an LRT system and we don't, I think that speaks volumes about our civic culture.

Every little secondary/tertiary Ontario city is at least looking at higher-order transit, but Haligonians keep keep hearing that we're not big enough (or rich enough) to get anything better than a scanty bus system. If anything this should be reversed. Halifax has a greater need for rapid urban transit than London, IMO.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1065  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2015, 6:52 PM
Nouvellecosse's Avatar
Nouvellecosse Nouvellecosse is offline
As seen on SSC ;)
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 5,105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drybrain View Post
Seriously, if London gets an LRT system and we don't, I think that speaks volumes about our civic culture.

Every little secondary/tertiary Ontario city is at least looking at higher-order transit, but Haligonians keep keep hearing that we're not big enough (or rich enough) to get anything better than a scanty bus system. If anything this should be reversed. Halifax has a greater need for rapid urban transit than London, IMO.
Personally I think in our case, having ROWs is just as important as what's travelling on them. Having dedicated transit/HOV lanes allowing buses to glide past choke points such as the Mac Donald bridge and its approaches and the Bayers rd and Herring Cove rd corridors would go a long way toward improving things. Certainly farther than having a rail vehicle if it gets stuck in the same choke points as buses. If transit actually acted as a shortcut to get people places quicker, hen it would become a lot more popular, and frequency could be improved due to increased demand, and as a result, traffic on the regular lanes would also be lessened.
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1066  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2015, 7:18 PM
Drybrain Drybrain is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,993
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
Personally I think in our case, having ROWs is just as important as what's travelling on them. Having dedicated transit/HOV lanes allowing buses to glide past choke points such as the Mac Donald bridge and its approaches and the Bayers rd and Herring Cove rd corridors would go a long way toward improving things. Certainly farther than having a rail vehicle if it gets stuck in the same choke points as buses. If transit actually acted as a shortcut to get people places quicker, hen it would become a lot more popular, and frequency could be improved due to increased demand, and as a result, traffic on the regular lanes would also be lessened.
I agree, but I also think that no matter how much sense it makes, and no matter how much public education there is, some people will just not make buses part of their daily lives, but will use rail. The only cities I've lived in where transit doesn't have a bit of a "loser cruiser" reputation are those with some form of rail transport.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1067  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2015, 9:22 PM
Nouvellecosse's Avatar
Nouvellecosse Nouvellecosse is offline
As seen on SSC ;)
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 5,105
^ Obviously that is true. The only question is, if transit were a significant time savings instead of just being cheaper, would the group of hold outs be large enough to justify the extra tends of millions of $$ that LRT would cost.

Although if I had it my way we'd electrify the key bus corridors either way, so the cost difference wouldn't be quite as huge as between LRT and regular buses. So something to think about.
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1068  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2015, 11:13 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 17,965
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drybrain View Post
I agree, but I also think that no matter how much sense it makes, and no matter how much public education there is, some people will just not make buses part of their daily lives, but will use rail. The only cities I've lived in where transit doesn't have a bit of a "loser cruiser" reputation are those with some form of rail transport.
I think part of the disconnect here is that most studies focus on easily-measured benefits and tend to leave out the other stuff. Actually they even leave out some easily-measured stuff like variance in travel times and adherence to schedules.

There are a bunch of real things that transit riders care about that studies don't tend to pay much attention to:
- Are the vehicles clean, safe, and comfortable?
- How much work do I need to do to plan my trip? How reliable will my plans be?
- Is the transit service good enough for me to give up my car? If it's only good to use during commuting hours I'll still need to have a car for all the other stuff, so why bother paying for a transit pass as well? Also, what happens if I get rid of my vehicle and then service levels change?

I think the "loser cruiser" reputation is the effect, not the cause, of a lack of desirability, and the lack of desirability exists for real, practical reasons. It's not just some cultural quirk.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1069  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2015, 12:49 AM
Nouvellecosse's Avatar
Nouvellecosse Nouvellecosse is offline
As seen on SSC ;)
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 5,105
I think having transit focused on commuting as a start isn't such a bad thing. It can help the downtown develop without the need for too much parking and really take the steam out of traffic during peak periods which in a place like Hfx tends to be the biggest concern anyway. People living out in lower density places like Cole Harbour, Spryfield, Sackville etc. aren't going to give up their cars as long as they're living there, period. Their grocery stores, malls, schools, parks, community centres, really everything is fronted by large parking areas and things are dispersed in a manner that makes frequent transit service infeasible. But if transit gets you into town much faster and more predictably than driving, and is much cheaper, then it's still good.

I have a former colleague that lives way out in Tantallon and works downtown who takes the 330 Metro X because the cost of downtown parking alone, not counting gas or car maintenance, is cheaper than his transit fare.
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1070  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2017, 5:03 AM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 2,373
Quote:
Commuter rail 'very feasible' possibility in Halifax, Via Rail president says
Quote:
He told reporters Via and the municipality need to finalize an operating plan that looks at capacity, traffic schedules and pricing, then bring it to CN, the railway owner, for approval. Desjardins-Siciliano said the work is headed in the right direction and he expected the owner would be open to the idea as long as there are no conflicts.
Source

Sounds promising. Let's hope everybody can get on the same page and make it work.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1071  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2017, 11:25 AM
q12's Avatar
q12 q12 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Halifax
Posts: 1,884
Quote:
New HRM transit plan shows commuter trains on both sides of harbour

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-s...ifax-1.4078475
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Atlantic Provinces > Halifax > Transportation & Infrastructure
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 3:47 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.