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  #81  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2017, 7:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Laceoflight View Post
|| Running shoes (pronounce : rénille chouzes in the worst case) or just Souliers ||
I'd say "espadrille" for sneakers/running shoes is very common in Quebec too. That's what my kids and all of their friends call them. And when we get notes from school about what's needed for gym class, it's always the word "espadrille" that is used. Signage in shops also reflects this.

As you probably know, in France an "espadrille" isn't that at all. It generally refers to a type of light canvas footwear. Like you might wear on a summer day.

In France, sneakers/running shoes/espadrilles are known as "baskets".

The slow and subtle internationalization of the French spoken in Quebec has led "baskets" to gain some traction here, but it's still not what most people say. Even if most everyone is familiar with the term.
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  #82  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2017, 8:03 PM
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I know espadrile because of Shea Coulee.

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  #83  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2017, 8:44 PM
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So I see we were having none of this toque business.

Last edited by Marty_Mcfly; Aug 25, 2017 at 8:58 PM.
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  #84  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2017, 8:46 PM
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I was telling Ayreonaut it's so foreign to me I don't even read it right. I always initially say "toke" in my head. And then remember what it really is.
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  #85  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2017, 9:51 PM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
I was telling Ayreonaut it's so foreign to me I don't even read it right. I always initially say "toke" in my head. And then remember what it really is.
I don't like that spelling either... I use touque, which although not standard, looks much better to me.
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  #86  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2017, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I'd say "espadrille" for sneakers/running shoes is very common in Quebec too. That's what my kids and all of their friends call them. And when we get notes from school about what's needed for gym class, it's always the word "espadrille" that is used. Signage in shops also reflects this.
As you probably know, in France an "espadrille" isn't that at all. It generally refers to a type of light canvas footwear. Like you might wear on a summer
day.


In France, sneakers/running shoes/espadrilles are known as "baskets".

The slow and subtle internationalization of the French spoken in Quebec has led "baskets" to gain some traction here, but it's still not what most people say. Even if most everyone is familiar with the term.
As in English - a canvas upper with a braided rope sole.
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  #87  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2017, 10:05 PM
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edit.
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  #88  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2017, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Laceoflight View Post
We used to play it every spring and fall, outside, at elementary school (en éducation physique). We always called it kickball.
Yes, I've never ever even suspected there could be people out there who'd have another name for it. Most sports by far only have one: baseball, hockey, basketball, tennis...

Quebec would be deep red in the kickball map, had they done their study correctly. (I don't doubt that Montreal Anglos call that sport whatever Ontarians call it.)
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  #89  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2017, 8:08 PM
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  #90  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2017, 8:39 PM
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Interesting graphic. Ontario has high hydro (or electricity...) costs in a Canadian context but doesn't necessarily seem to be the case worldwide. Although there are a lot of extra factors in the bill other than the rate. I have heard it's a lot more expensive in New York state though.

Australia was a shocking one to me - I knew it was mostly coal but didn't know emissions were that high. Sparse population density probably helps with pollution. Cooling towers from coal plants seemed to be a ubiquitous sight in South Africa - they were all over Gauteng province. They're on a big building kick now after realizing that there was not enough power capacity taking into account both population growth and the electrification of rural areas, townships and informal settlements that were ignored under apartheid. Even wealthy areas had scheduled rolling blackouts (called load shedding) for years.
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  #91  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2017, 10:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Laceoflight View Post
It's always more convenient to ignore that a part of the country is francophone. Our obvious (or not-so obvious) answers would have been different, for the most part. That would have made the maps look more canadiennes:

Liqueur || Dépanneur || Tuque || Broyeur || Crayons de couleur (or à colorier) || Kraft dinner (after 1995) or Macaroni au fromage (generic) || Divan || Cônes orange || Souper || Chalet || Running shoes (pronounce : rénille chouzes in the worst case) or just Souliers || Coton ouaté. Hoodie is becoming something, but that wasn't the case before || Kickball || Quelqu’un qui s’est levé du mauvais pied || Décalques or Papier transfert (we don’t really have a common word for decal) || ca-ra-mel (pronounce : kaʁamɛl) || Papier de construction or Papier bristol (not the same thing) || Notes || Ustensiles or Couverts || T'as-rond-Teau (pronounce : tɔ.ʁɔ̃.to) || Gouttières || Le compte d’hydro or just L’électricité || Élastique.
In some ways it does make sense to exclude Francophones from this type of analysis though. Yes, Francophones make up a significant proportion of Canada, but since French is a completely different language, you won't get the same "value" in the type of survey that was done. It's not an effort to snub, but rather a conscious choice to look at how the English used in different places varies. It can of course be flavoured by other languages, but that's part of the regional "English" comparison; what different dynamics in each region have affected the English that's used? Dépanneur is a great example of that; it's so prevalent that it's used in English discourse.

One would pretty much want to do a completely separate survey that involves Francophones from different parts of the country to get at a similar concept (which I think would be interesting too).

Last edited by Nathan; Aug 26, 2017 at 11:06 PM.
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  #92  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2017, 3:10 AM
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When I was in school, we played "soccer hockey". It was basically hockey, but in the grass and with a ball instead of a puck. You would shoot the ball with a stick just like in hockey, into a literal hockey net. It was much easier than hockey for some fairly obvious reasons.

Kickball was our name for Soccer, and Soccer was a mysterious thing that kids in wealthier homes did at the park which we didn't really understand, but they sold us chocolate bars to help pay for it.

I use soda instead of pop online because there is less need to explain what you mean. I found that when I say pop online, people question it.

I call traffic cones "pine cones" because I confuse the terms "pylon" and "traffic cone". And speaking of pylons, the large lattice structures that hold of high voltage lines are "hydro towers".
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  #93  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2017, 3:29 AM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Yes, I've never ever even suspected there could be people out there who'd have another name for it. Most sports by far only have one: baseball, hockey, basketball, tennis...

Quebec would be deep red in the kickball map, had they done their study correctly. (I don't doubt that Montreal Anglos call that sport whatever Ontarians call it.)
My kids and their friends confirm it's kickball for them.
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  #94  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2017, 3:31 AM
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Originally Posted by vid View Post
When I was in school, we played "soccer hockey". It was basically hockey, but in the grass and with a ball instead of a puck. You would shoot the ball with a stick just like in hockey, into a literal hockey net. It was much easier than hockey for some fairly obvious reasons.
That's called "boots hockey" here.

(Alternatively, we also say "hockey cosom" and/or "hockey balle".)

The dynamics are actually closer to soccer than ice hockey, IMO. I've played all three for years. Sure, you use a stick rather than your feet, but the fact there's no momentum management make the game functionally much more like soccer. You can stop, turn, accelerate, position yourself, etc. exactly like in soccer.

All things considered, I prefer both soccer and this "soccer hockey" to ice hockey, I'd say. I suppose I'll have to turn in my Canadian card
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  #95  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2017, 3:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Nathan View Post
In some ways it does make sense to exclude Francophones from this type of analysis though.
Absolutely, but then I'd have presented the graphics differently, leaving most of Quebec blank or blacked out, with a round patch of color in southern Quebec intended to represent our Anglos.

Had they done it that way they'd always have been correct, rather than occasionally totally wrong as they've been - for example, on the kickball one.
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  #96  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2017, 3:41 AM
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Never heard of boots hockey. I guess it is someone's translation of hockey bottines.

Also never ever heard of soccer hockey. When I read it I thought of a big soccer ball.

But with a tennis ball (or that size) I think it is called ball hockey in English.


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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
That's called "boots hockey" here.

(Alternatively, we also say "hockey cosom" and/or "hockey balle".)

The dynamics are actually closer to soccer than ice hockey, IMO. I've played all three for years. Sure, you use a stick rather than your feet, but the fact there's no momentum management make the game functionally much more like soccer. You can stop, turn, accelerate, position yourself, etc. exactly like in soccer.

All things considered, I prefer both soccer and this "soccer hockey" to ice hockey, I'd say. I suppose I'll have to turn in my Canadian card
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  #97  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2017, 3:47 AM
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Never heard of boots hockey. I guess it is someone's translation of hockey bottines.

Also never ever heard of soccer hockey. When I read it I thought of a big soccer ball.

But with a tennis ball (or that size) I think it is called ball hockey in English.
I've never heard the words "boots hockey", it was my own translation of hockey bottines for vid's benefit.

Also, I'm nearly certain no one plays it with anything other than those orange balls (tennisball-sized) designed for that sport. I really doubt people would play it with hockey sticks and a soccer ball! Doable, but not very nice - you'd have to always have your stick's flat curved surface (how do you say "palette" in English?) a couple inches above the ground, and I don't think you could slapshot well. In fact if I were forced to play that sport I'd carry the hockey stick if I had to but I'd use my feet
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  #98  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2017, 6:26 AM
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^ Yup, hockey without a pick, but a ball instead (pretty much always the bright orange ball meant for the sport as was mentioned above), was ball hockey, though if done on the street - having to move the nets when cars were coming - would be street hockey rather than ball hockey... And sometimes called shinny if you're being a little more "official", which is kind of funny since this is all about regional colloquialisms.
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  #99  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2017, 6:32 AM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Absolutely, but then I'd have presented the graphics differently, leaving most of Quebec blank or blacked out, with a round patch of color in southern Quebec intended to represent our Anglos.

Had they done it that way they'd always have been correct, rather than occasionally totally wrong as they've been - for example, on the kickball one.
There are likely enough English speakers outside of the specific concentration zones to fill out the map of the province though... By the same definition as you have, you'd probably want to black out much of Northern Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec, as well as the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut for both English and French comparisons as the sparse populations would more likely use native languages like Cree, Ojibway, Dene, or Inuktitut...
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  #100  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2017, 11:43 AM
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There are likely enough English speakers outside of the specific concentration zones to fill out the map of the province though... By the samYe definition as you have, you'd probably want to black out much of Northern Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec, as well as the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut for both English and French comparisons as the sparse populations would more likely use native languages like Cree, Ojibway, Dene, or Inuktitut...
So, this was yet another case where the Anglo-Canada moniker would have been useful! But people are wont to use it and prefer to use Canadians a whole instead!

So when you think about it an unknowing foreigner who sees that might think that in Quebec most people would say "j'ai besoin de coloured pencils pour l'école"!
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