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  #41  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 6:59 PM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
That's happening to an extent but not to those 3 cities.
well, the New York times did just declare Detroit the most exciting city in America.

It's not far from you, maybe you should visit and check out the scene.
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  #42  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 7:04 PM
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But they (creatives/artists) managed to live in the city even amidst the prices. Sharing rooms, apartments, etc..

I feel like the tone in a lot of this conversation is that NYC is unreachable to some. That is not true. There is plenty of opportunity. The city is not being yuppified as a whole. Some sections are no doubt, but 300 sq miles is a lot, and there is plenty of opportunity and neighborhoods to blossom with culture.

People will come and go, and its always evolving. It just may not be the same old heads of the past. What can be seen as creative now, probally wasn't 30,40,50 years ago. If you want a city that is really becoming unreachable, that is SF, but NY learns from their mistakes, they build of housing and are relaxing zoning. We have our problems here too, but not on that level. When even tech employees are having a hard time, that tells you something.
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  #43  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 7:08 PM
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Originally Posted by dc_denizen View Post
well, the New York times did just declare Detroit the most exciting city in America.

It's not far from you, maybe you should visit and check out the scene.
Detroit needs to fix the crime issue, and it could in theory blossom after that. Granted there has been a level of resurgence, but the magnitude could be much higher.

Places like Detroit, and especially Baltimore have a ton of untapped potential.
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  #44  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 7:14 PM
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Ironically, Detroit just had a big festival for creatives last night, and there was a street shooting, cancelling the event.

Detroit has made real progress in the core, but the idea that Detroit is uniquely "exciting" or a huge mecca for creatives, is a bit odd. Much of the city looks post zombie-invasion, and even the "revitalized" core is mostly quiet and empty.
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  #45  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 7:37 PM
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to chris's point:

Why NYC is Still The Best City for Creatives

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The jobs are here. It’s so much easier to find a job in a creative field in NYC than it is anywhere else in the country. Where else can you make a living designing space-age shopping piers, or painting art on walls, or writing about your city on the internet for people to leave angry comments on?

The most amazing people are here. Almost every professional opportunity I’ve had in my adult life—from gigs in the apparel industry, to opportunities in the art world, to signing on for this very writing job—has come from the people I’ve met in New York. Most of my friends and peers have had the same experience.

Literal world-class culture is $2.75 away. How wild is that? When you live in NYC, you don’t need to fly across the world to experience something amazing. Infinite inspiration is right here, and only a Metrocard swipe away.

Manufacturing is actually happening here. As someone who runs a made-in-NYC apparel line, I can safely say that manufacturing won’t be coming back to the states in any major way, despite what our new government officials are claiming.

The drive is here. Moving to LA sounds… Nice. The weather is always beautiful, the pace is slower, everyone is fake-nice to each other, and smiling at someone on the street doesn’t necessarily mean you want to bone them.

You’ll never get bored. There’s a reason why creative people do what we do: because we’re not easily satisfied.

Sure, you could live in the woods and make art all day and survive and be happy, but would that be enough? Would it be enough to not experience the richest culture, to not meet the most creative people? To not be in the middle of it all? To not feel like you’re conquering something amazing?

For many creatives, of course it would be enough. That’s why places like Los Angeles, Denver, and Detroit have such vibrant art districts, filled with incredible, talented people who don’t need the constant stimuli that New York provides.

But for a lot of us, this city is the best place to live, to be inspired, to be an artist, a performer, a designer, a writer. NYC is our home, and we wouldn’t—couldn’t—have it any other way.

Besides, I couldn’t exactly get paid to write about New York City if I lived somewhere else, now could I?
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  #46  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 7:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Ironically, Detroit just had a big festival for creatives last night, and there was a street shooting, cancelling the event.

Detroit has made real progress in the core, but the idea that Detroit is uniquely "exciting" or a huge mecca for creatives, is a bit odd. Much of the city looks post zombie-invasion, and even the "revitalized" core is mostly quiet and empty.
that's called authenticity.
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  #47  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 7:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Ironically, Detroit just had a big festival for creatives last night, and there was a street shooting, cancelling the event.
I don't see how this is relevant, just some smearing on your part. It was some idiot teen incident on a backstreet, nobody was killed and the event wasn't canceled it was already in process. Wasn't there a shooting in Manhatten just this Halloween that killed eight people? And can we even count how many shootings happen in San Francisco's core? Seattle had a downtown shooting a month ago that killed two people.

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Detroit has made real progress in the core, but the idea that Detroit is uniquely "exciting" or a huge mecca for creatives, is a bit odd. Much of the city looks post zombie-invasion, and even the "revitalized" core is mostly quiet and empty.
It's exciting because creatives can buy and renovate homes, build businesses and actually ya know create things; while in New York all they'll ever be is small fish paying ludicrous rent in an overrated, over-competitive city run by oligarchs and trust fund babies. Galapagos moved out of Brooklyn because of this. And the core isn't empty, but you're known for alternative facts.
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  #48  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 8:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Then those places would be painfully expensive. It would be the same issue.

Anyways, creatives have been leaving NYC forever. 100 years ago they were fleeing NYC in search of cheap studio or performance space. Excepting a short period in the 70's, when the city was going to hell, NYC has basically always been painfully expensive and a massive net exporter of talent and wealth.
And a net importer of talented people from the rest of the country in need of training and education in the arts
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  #49  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
That's happening to an extent but not to those 3 cities.
You'd be surprised, there are more New Yorkers then you'd expect that move to Detroit and around the region, it's not that uncommon to run into NY transplants. There are constant inquiries from Brooklynites looking at the city or moving soon and deciding which neighborhood is best to settle in.
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  #50  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 2:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Ironically, Detroit just had a big festival for creatives last night, and there was a street shooting, cancelling the event.

Detroit has made real progress in the core, but the idea that Detroit is uniquely "exciting" or a huge mecca for creatives, is a bit odd. Much of the city looks post zombie-invasion, and even the "revitalized" core is mostly quiet and empty.
But but, compared to other Rust Belt cities though...!!! Why so negative!?
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  #51  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 3:04 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
It would be nice if all those people could make some sort of pact to all move to the same place to infuse it with critical creative mass. Detroit or Philly for example.
Creative types still need jobs that pay well enough to support themselves and transportation (Car notes, maintenance and insurance are extremely expensive, especially in high crime / high tax areas and areas with abysmal road conditions). Detroit's still lacking in both, unless you're an Automotive Engineer or want to work 60 hours per week as a glorified CSR at Quicken for a salary of only $25,000.
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  #52  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 3:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The North One View Post
You'd be surprised, there are more New Yorkers then you'd expect that move to Detroit and around the region, it's not that uncommon to run into NY transplants. There are constant inquiries from Brooklynites looking at the city or moving soon and deciding which neighborhood is best to settle in.
Detriot is ripe for innovation and people are flocking there. Went to grad school with a guy who moved there years ago and got highly involved in real-estate. First ran for some Wayne county office and then founded Loveland. Seems to be done pretty well.
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  #53  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 11:03 PM
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Yeah I wouldn't mind investing if Detroit. When the time is right of course. Buy the right places, right apartments buildings, drop like 500k-1 mil as a start, and there might be some progress. Its incredible how the prices are.

You ever see the movie "The Super" with Joe Pesci, thats how I'd envision this plan of mine.

I'm being serious too! I would invest in the place if the time was right. Right after I get my carry permit.
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  #54  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2017, 2:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
Yeah I wouldn't mind investing if Detroit. When the time is right of course. Buy the right places, right apartments buildings, drop like 500k-1 mil as a start, and there might be some progress. Its incredible how the prices are.

You ever see the movie "The Super" with Joe Pesci, thats how I'd envision this plan of mine.

I'm being serious too! I would invest in the place if the time was right. Right after I get my carry permit.
Get yourself a nice big one with armor piercing ammo. Don't you vugg around and settle for less.
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  #55  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2017, 1:46 PM
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NYC in the near future will still be dominant, probably even more so. The core areas are expanding beyond Manhattan and into the outer boroughs. Brooklyn and Queens can now say they have downtowns that can rival those of the mid-size cities in the country. New York also has the transit infrastructure to expand further and urbanize extra chunks of New Jersey, Long Island, and even Connecticut. Hell, one day the city might become the official core of the northeast megalopolis if it isn't already.

If the city can figure out how to manage growth without reaching the NIMBY problems in other metros and can deal with sea level rise, it will continue to expand and be relevant.

LA might finally become its closest peer in the future in size and influence, but I don't see NYC going anywhere unless any of the doomsday scenarios from Hollywood occurs. New York is pretty much America's most complete version of Rome. Its role may change but its power to influence will possibly continue for years to come.
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  #56  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2017, 1:55 PM
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With all that's rising, major rezoning of areas, and numerous large scale properties bought, the next 10 years will be full of activity. The city won't decline. It might slow down in its rate, but I don't think enough to stabilize it and see a net growth of 0%.

Its proxies, like Jersey City and Newark, are seeing progress in adding new residents. So while the city might slow down (as indicative by permit application (2014,2015,2016,2017) and pop growth, the trend is still upwards.

The city is highly competitive, and major rezoning like the Midtown East promise to add new space, attract tenants, and with it, jobs and new residents.

One thing about this particular city is that it reaps the benefits of global instability. What I mean by that is that when the economic conditions in other countries goes down hill, migration and immigration both of people and capital infuse the city with the needed boost to accelerate growth.

A similar phenomena of the above is seen in Frankfurt Germany and Paris, who are reaping the benefits of Brexit for example. NY shares that similar positive fate, as capital and resources relocate. One of the plus's of globalization. On the contrary, it can also be a boon, especially domestically, where we have capital and people leaving but the net growth is still positive. The economy will dictate growth patterns, especially in an integrated major city like NY.
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