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  #101  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2017, 8:03 PM
zzptichka zzptichka is online now
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Nice photo.
Do they close pedestrian bridge and the lookout during the day?
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  #102  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2017, 6:42 PM
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Originally Posted by zzptichka View Post
Nice photo.
Do they close pedestrian bridge and the lookout during the day?
There might be too much sound equipment scattered throughout the site and it's is still a construction zone (seems to be a theme with Ottawa 2017 sites ). I don't think the lookout will be fully and freely open to the public until next summer.

I went back last night since I had a lousy view the first time over a few peoples heads. Still quite a line up but at least they are pacing the crowd so the almost everyone gets a spot by the railing which is critical to enjoying the spectacle. Being right in front gave me a more favourable impression of the show.

When I had heard that they were moving the Kontinuum equipment over, I had been expecting some projected images a bit like Agwata earlier in the summer, but this is basically spotlights timed to clubby music. Nevertheless, it's a great reintroduction of the falls to the public who hasn't seen much of it in a hundred years.

An excerpt from my crappy phone:
Video Link
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  #103  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 12:32 PM
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Awesome to hear you got in, Harley...great pic! I got there at 9. The people at the front of the line said they'd been there since 7:30, so we gave up. Going to try again tomorrow.
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  #104  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 1:24 PM
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Awesome to hear you got in, Harley...great pic! I got there at 9. The people at the front of the line said they'd been there since 7:30, so we gave up. Going to try again tomorrow.
I went on the first night, at 9:00, and we ended up around 10:00pm seeing the show. Everyone working/volunteering there was excited and doing their best to accommodate. They had changed the layout of the viewing area on the fly to best flow everyone through. Its not a huge area to view the falls and so its difficult to get a large volume of people through. The walk to the falls was also interesting, with Algonquin people and information displays at the half-way point.

I noticed the low water too, only two gates are partially open so there's not a lot of water. It looked like you could easily jump off the rocks and swim in the river! This would be an epic show in the spring when the water is high.
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  #105  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 3:08 PM
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How does one get there? Is there parking anywhere nearby?
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  #106  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 6:10 PM
AndyMEng AndyMEng is offline
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How does one get there? Is there parking anywhere nearby?
I parked on Fleet Street (freemium), actually at the bottom parking near the cliff heating plant.

You can pay to park near to the site, but it's $10 (Vertical Reality, and a smaller, closer lot).

The walk from Fleet Street is nice, you get to walk through claridge, then across the holocaust monument, and finally down the highway to quebec to the site.
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  #107  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 6:12 PM
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I parked on Fleet Street (freemium), actually at the bottom parking near the cliff heating plant.

You can pay to park near to the site, but it's $10 (Vertical Reality, and a smaller, closer lot).

The walk from Fleet Street is nice, you get to walk through claridge, then across the holocaust monument, and finally down the highway to quebec to the site.
Thanks
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  #108  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 11:52 AM
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Ottawa 2017's Mìwàte roils Chaudière Falls controversy

Andrew Duffy, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: October 11, 2017 | Last Updated: October 11, 2017 5:46 PM EDT


The city’s popular new sound and light show, Mìwàte, has breathed new life into an old controversy about the fate of Chaudière Falls and two nearby islands slated for development.

Mìwàte — it means “dazzle with light” in Anishinaabe — has drawn overflow crowds during its first week while revealing to a new generation of Canadians the dramatic vista that lies at the heart of their capital.

The area is considered sacred by the Algonquin people, who used the islands for centuries to convene tribal meetings and to perform tobacco ceremonies — a ritual first described in 1613 by French explorer Samuel de Champlain.

Free The Falls, a local group formed to see the Chaudière Falls and the nearby islands restored to their natural state, said Mìwàte has turned a much-needed spotlight on the issue.

Albert Dumont, an Algonquin elder, writer and healer, said he objected to the whole idea of Mìwàte, which he believed offended the spirituality of the site. While still opposed, he recognizes the month-long event as an opportunity to build support for the Free the Falls movement.

The group wants the hydro ring dam that controls water flow over the falls to be removed, and the islands reserved for a central park, an Indigenous healing and peace centre as envisioned by celebrated Algonquin leader William Commanda.

“It definitely presents an opportunity for us to share our message,” Dumont said. “After it (Mìwàte) began at Chaudière Falls, it dawned on me that people will go down there and see the magnificence, the beauty, the spirituality of that place, and then they’ll ask themselves: ‘Why should we turn this place over to a developer?’

“If it’s a park or green space, then all people can benefit from it.”

He asked Canadians to sign an online petition that would force the federal government to respond to the group’s concerns.

Gilbert Whiteduck, the former chief of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation, said turning the falls and islands over to the Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation would be a meaningful act of reconciliation.

“There is much work to be done and it will take the voices of citizens of Ottawa and Gatineau as well as other Canadians for such an act of reconciliation to take place,” he wrote in an email. “I am convinced that it is possible but it will require that people open up their spirits, open up their minds to what should be, what can be.”

Not all members of the Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation, however, oppose plans by the Windmill Development Group and Dream Unlimited to build a $1.2-billion project, known as Zibi, on Chaudière and Albert Islands.

The planned development is to include condominiums, hotels, retail space and parks, all built in consultation with the Algonquins of Pikwàkanagan First Nation in the Ottawa Valley. The islands fall within the community’s land claim — the largest in Ontario — and its leaders consider the Zibi development an appropriate way to reclaim an area lost to industrialization.

Jeff Westeinde, chairman of the Windmill Development Group, said it’s important to note that much of the land being developed did not exist two centuries ago.

“Most of the land we’re developing, they’re infilled, contaminated sites that were created by the industrialists,” he said. “There’s nowhere on our property where you can actually see the falls.”

Hydro Ottawa owns the land nearest the falls that’s hosting Mìwàte.

Westeinde said there’s an ongoing debate among Indigenous groups as to whether all of the islands are sacred or just parts of them.

“We’ve done a tremendous amount of work with the (Indigenous) communities we’re engaged with to understand what they want to see on these properties — and we’ve designed the community accordingly,” he said.

Carleton University associate journalism professor Randy Boswell, who has written extensively about Ottawa’s industrial and archaeological past, said he was surprised by the city’s decision to put Chaudière Falls in the spotlight during Ottawa 2017.

“It’s hard to imagine a place in Ottawa-Gatineau more fraught than the falls,” he said. “It’s an unambiguously sacred space for the region’s Algonquin people, and it straddles the boundary between between Ottawa and Gatineau so it’s jurisdictionally complex.”

Boswell’s own research has established that the area, once the epicentre of the city’s lumber industry, also contributed to the city’s first pollution crisis: thick rafts of sawdust that choked the river.

“At the very least, every future use of the falls and the surrounding area should reflect — in meaningful and lasting ways — the ongoing importance of the site to Indigenous nations,” he said, “and its significance in the industrial and environmental history of Ottawa-Gatineau.”

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...ls-controversy
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  #109  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 5:22 PM
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Skating rink on the Hill to close out Canada 150 party
Free family skating and Sens practice among events coming to Parliament Hill in December

By Joanne Chianello, CBC News Posted: Oct 12, 2017 6:18 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 12, 2017 4:38 PM ET




The NHL's bid to play hockey on Parliament Hill may have fallen through, but come December, you could be performing a triple lutz on the iced-over lawn of Canada's seat of government.

Canadian Heritage is partnering with the Ottawa Senators and the Bell Capital Cup to build the first ever NHL-sized skating rink on the Hill as part of the closing events for Canada's 150 celebrations. All events will be free of charge, although tickets may be issued to manage crowds.

The rink is expected to be open from Dec. 7 to 31, although one of the key events will be Canada 150 Skating Day on Dec. 10, a sesquicentennial celebration that "will also include events in 200 community arenas from coast to coast to coast," according to a new release from the heritage department.

Details on exactly what activities will be offered on the Hill in December are expected to become available over the next few weeks, but the annual Christmas Lights Across Canada — complete with a multimedia show, music and pyrotechnics — ceremony is already scheduled for Dec. 7, the day the rink is to open.

Andrew Campbell, Canadian Heritage's senior executive director of Canada 150, said stands with seating for 1,000 will line the Wellington Street side of the Hill, while an accessible viewing platform will be erected on the east side. There will be benches for people to put on their skates.

Visitors will also see another very Canadian sight on the Hill — a Zamboni to maintain the refrigerated ice.

"We're as excited as everybody about what a great moment this can be skating under the stars and looking up at Parliament Hill — or during the day and the Peace Tower right in front of you — will be a cool moment," Campbell said Thursday.

He said officials are still working on the logistics for security and access to the Hill, and are finalizing the cost of mounting the new activities.

There will also be an Ottawa Senators practice and Senators alumni skating events, the NHL team confirmed Thursday.

And it sounds as if at least some youngsters will get a chance to play hockey on the Hill.

"The opportunity to play outdoors on Parliament Hill as part of Canada 150 will provide a pure and unique Canadian family hockey experience for the participating children and teams," according to a statement from Todd White, the honorary chair of the Bell Capital Cup.

And the department plans to close out Canada 150 on Parliament Hill on New Year's Eve.

Until late last year, the NHL was lobbying to host an outdoor game between the Ottawa Senators and the Montreal Canadiens on the Hill, but the logistics — and the protocols that govern the events that can happen there — proved impossible to surmount.

Mounting an NHL game on the Hill would have required at least four months to construct a temporary arena for 30,000 spectators, and there were concerns that the work would impede parliamentary business, public access and security.

In addition, an NHL game would have broken a long list of rules around what can take place on the Hill. Organized sporting events, charging admission, commercial advertising, and selling food and alcohol on the Hill are all prohibited.

Instead, the two teams will face off on Dec. 16 at Lansdowne's TD Place Stadium for Ottawa's first outdoor NHL game.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...hill-1.4351263
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  #110  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2017, 11:43 PM
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Why the government decided against an NHL game on Parliament Hill for Canada 150
In their pitch, the NHL was promising a game that would put Canada at the forefront. After much consideration, the heritage department decided it was not the right fit.

By: Ryan Tumilty, Metro
Published on Wed Nov 22 2017




The government had many key details worked out for the staging of an NHL game on Parliament Hill before putting the idea on ice, Metro can reveal.

The historic outdoor game would have taken place as part of the country's Canada 150 celebrations but last fall the government opted not to pursue the idea.

Documents Metro received after a year-long delay show the government had briefings prepared for the board of internal economy, the committee of MPs which controls events on the hill.

In their pitch to the government, the NHL was promising a game that would put Canada at the forefront.

“We would infuse the game with an assortment of uniquely Canadian elements, such as boards created from B.C. lumber, an Alumni Game featuring Canada’s greatest living hockey legends and a national contest to bring a selection of Canadians from every province,” reads the league’s application under the Canada 150 program.

The league was also offering to put the Canada 150 logo into games and other promotions in both this season and last to help draw attention to the game.

Briefing notes indicated that a prohibition on advertising on the hill could be worked around, because it would be similar to Canada Day on Parliament Hill, where sponsors are thanked for their involvement.

The NHL had offered designs for a stadium of between 23,000 and 27,000 seats on the hill that would have started construction in mid-October this year and been open to the game in mid-December and then deconstructed through January.

On the day of the game, the hill would be fenced off and Wellington Street would have been closed to traffic for several days.

The details are blacked out, but the government was prepared to make some financial contribution to the game. It also envisioned in-kind contributions from other government departments, the city and Ottawa 2017.

The department also appeared to worry about setting a precedent, but in a briefing note they wrote they didn’t think anyone would want to try this again.

“Given the condition that a profit not be made from the event, it is unlikely that other organizations will proactively seek to host an event on Parliament Hill.”

Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly said her department gave the idea due consideration, but ultimately it was not the right fit.

“The idea of Canada 150 has been to empower communities and we have wanted to have a very bottom-up approach,” she said.

Joly said it makes more sense to have ordinary Canadians skating on the hill.

“We will have the chance some great NHL players eventually skating with people here, but Canada is about the strength of its communities and Canada 150 has reflected Canada.”

NHL Game on Parliament Hill Memorandum

http://www.metronews.ca/news/ottawa/...anada-150.html
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  #111  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2017, 11:48 PM
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MosaïCanada raked in millions for capital region: report
Popular Canada 150 exhibit attracted 1.3M visitors, generated $28M for Ottawa-Gatineau

CBC News Posted: Nov 23, 2017 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Nov 23, 2017 11:06 AM ET




MosaïCanada 150 was a great, green success in more ways than one: the popular horticultural exhibit raked in $28 million for the Ottawa-Gatineau region and more than $32.5 million in additional spending in the province of Quebec, according to a new report by KPMG.

Part of the Canada 150 lineup of events, the exhibit surpassed its goal of attracting 800,000 visitors nearly two months before the end of its run.

More than 1.3 million people visited the display at Jacques-Cartier Park between June 30 and Sept.15, the report said.

A separate report conducted by the research firm SEGMA found 70 per cent of the exhibit's visitors came to the region specifically to see MosaïCanada​ 150.

Mosaïcultures Internationales de Montréal organized the event, which featured some 40 different plant sculptures and included works from Indigenous artists and from Canada's provinces and territories.

After the popularity of the summer exhibit, Mosaïcultures will be returning to Jacques-Cartier Park this winter with ice and snow sculptures

The exhibit will be renamed Mosaivernales, a play on the French term "hivernales," which refers to winter activities.

Mosaivernales will be open to the public from Jan. 27 to March 4, and will reuse some of the structures left over from the summer display.

"We're going to reuse the sculptures like the boats, so we take the metal structure that has already been installed and we build around that, with snow and ice," said Kim Murray, communication manager at MosaïCanada 150, in a French-language interview with Radio-Canada.

The artists who create the sculptures are coming from Harbin, China, Murray said, and are experts in creating larger-than-life artwork.

Visual effects will be added to the sculptures in the evenings, she added.

"With technology in the nighttime, we're going to have a different feel to the artwork, and it's going to be something very special and unique," she said.

The winter exhibit will run at the same time as Winterlude 2018 programming, and one of the festival's most popular attractions — the Snowflake Kingdom — may have to be altered slightly to accommodate Mosaivernales.

"The setup will be a little redesigned," Murray said. "I don't have those details exactly, but I was told that it would be very easy for both of the activities to coexist."

While entrance to MosaïCanada 150 was free, Gatineau officials said there will be a fee to visit the exhibit over the winter, though the rate hasn't yet been decided on.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...port-1.4414176
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  #112  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2017, 11:48 PM
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Parliament Hill skating rink to stay open until end of February
The rink was originally meant to be open just 3 weeks in December

CBC News Posted: Nov 23, 2017 2:01 PM ET Last Updated: Nov 23, 2017 2:23 PM ET




Within a day of criticisms that the $5.6-million skating rink being installed on the front lawn of Parliament Hill would be open for only a few weeks, Canadian Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly announced Thursday afternoon that the rink will remain through Winterlude 2018.

The NHL-sized rink was originally planned to be open only from Dec. 7 to Dec. 31, but will now be open until the end of February.

Joly said in a tweet that extending the rink's closing date will allow more Canadians to take advantage of a unique chance to skate on Parliament Hill.

However, the minister couldn't say how much more it would cost to keep the rink open an additional two months.

Outside of organized events, no hockey sticks will be allowed on the ice. Cell phones are also banned.

Activities on the rink will include public skating, minor hockey games and ice sport demonstrations, according to the Canada 150 Rink website. Most events on the rink will be free and open to the public.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...tage-1.4416220
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  #113  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2017, 12:46 PM
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How can an outdoor skating rink possibly cost $5.6 million? Here's the breakdown

Joanne Laucius, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: November 28, 2017 | Last Updated: November 28, 2017 5:13 PM EST


Outrage over the $5.6 million cost of an outdoor hockey rink on the east lawn of Parliament Hill has reverberated across Canada.

To sum up the displeasure over the Canada 150 Ice Rink: How can it possibly cost so much to build and operate an outdoor ice rink? After all, countless Canadian families do the same thing in their backyards every winter for almost nothing.

The public wrath only increased last week when a list of rules for public skating was released, including no hockey, no figure skating, no food, no cellphones, no roughhousing or high speed, no tag and no carrying children on the ice. Kids under 12 must be accompanied by a responsible adult over the age of 18. Strollers and wheelchairs are permitted on the ice, but only if the occupants are wearing CSA-approved helmets.

Capital Sports Management has posted job openings for Zamboni drivers for the Canada 150 Ice Rink. Candidates must have experience operating ice resurfacing equipment.

The cost of the rink includes a contest to bring 32 peewee house-league hockey teams from across the country to Ottawa. And unlike the average backyard rink, this rink includes a cooling system and grandstand.

In response to a request from this newspaper for an itemized list of the $5.6 million in costs, the federal heritage ministry released a breakdown of expenses:

$2,374,920: Cost of event and venue design, including design and construction of the rink and moving and installing it in its permanent location
$958,400: Cost of staffing, general labour and project co-ordination
$849,310: Cost of site support, technical services, logistical services, purchases and other support services
$117,020: Other project expenses including rink operational costs
$1,300,350: Other programming and administrative expenses

Canadian Heritage further broke down the $1.3 million-plus in “other programming and administrative expenses”:

$842,600: Travel and accommodation for the house-league hockey teams, including airfare, busing, mileage and accommodations
$286,400: Promotion and communications, including marketing, signage, websites and social media
$98,600: Tournament direct expenses
$72,750: General administration

The rink will also end up costing more than $5.6 million. Last Thursday, Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly confirmed that the rink, which was to close Jan. 31, will now be open to the public until the end of February. The 2018 costs are currently not available, said Canadian Heritage.

— With files from Tyler Dawson

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...-the-breakdown
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  #114  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 9:15 PM
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Originally Posted by rocketphish View Post
Why the government decided against an NHL game on Parliament Hill for Canada 150
In their pitch, the NHL was promising a game that would put Canada at the forefront. After much consideration, the heritage department decided it was not the right fit.

By: Ryan Tumilty, Metro
Published on Wed Nov 22 2017




NHL Game on Parliament Hill Memorandum

http://www.metronews.ca/news/ottawa/...anada-150.html
That article is a great example of why we needed Metronews. Nowhere else did I see anything relating to the Feds logic behind refusing the NHL Classic on the Hill.

Nearly everytime I picked one up, they had content that I could not find anywhere else.

Metro Ottawa, you will be missed.
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  #115  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 1:55 AM
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Stephen Wilkes' Day to Night photograph documents historic Canada Day 2017 celebration

Lynn Saxberg, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: November 30, 2017 | Last Updated: November 30, 2017 7:50 PM EST




American photographer Stephen Wilkes, an artist who describes himself as a “relentless collector of magical moments,” returns to Ottawa today to unveil the latest image in his Day To Night series.

The dramatic, large-scale photograph offers a stunning view of Parliament Hill on Canada Day, complete with all the activity of this year’s sesquicentennial July 1 celebrations, from the tipi protest and security lineups to the fireworks and mainstage entertainers.

Like the others in Wilkes’ Day To Night series, it involved shooting hundreds of images from a fixed position over many hours, then compiling the photos seamlessly into one action-packed landscape that takes the eye through a day in the life of a place. Other subjects tackled by Wilkes over the past few years include The Vatican during Easter Mass, Paris during the Tour de France and Times Square on New Year’s Eve.

Funded by the Embassy of the United States in Ottawa as a symbol of American-Canadian friendship on the occasion of Canada’s 150th, the project posed a unique challenge, Wilkes says. After weeks of research by a location scout and several more months to get the proper clearance, the photographer and his team were set to shoot from the roof of a government building across the street from Parliament Hill. A platform was constructed in advance to accommodate their gear.

“For me, it’s always about finding the view,” says Wilkes, who first visited Ottawa in 2015 as a speaker in the Contemporary Conversations series at the National Gallery of Canada. “I wanted to be high enough to see off into the vast distance, but I also look for what I call foreground narrative in all my pictures. There’s a sweet spot where you can almost recognize faces in the crowd, and that’s the edge I live on.

“When I do these pictures, I’m outdoors for a minimum of 15 to 18 hours straight,” the photographer adds, explaining his process. “I’m running electrical, charging batteries and firing the images into a computer so I can see what I’m getting in real time. And one of the things that was going to be really challenging about this one was the weather. There were some very, very extreme thunderstorms coming in, and the amount of rain was going to make it very difficult, based on the radar and all the weather updates we were getting. It was going to be very difficult to be on a rooftop with lenses and cameras and electrical equipment for any extended period.”

Two days before the big day, Wilkes was checking on the arrangements, and happened to notice a vacant office on the fourth floor of the building. The door was unlocked so he ventured in.

“Lo and behold, we walk into this one area and I saw, literally, the exact same view with a sliding window so I can actually get my camera out,” he said. “We were completely protected from all the rain, the wind, the humidity. It was absolutely perfect, the greatest gift of all. That’s where we shot the photograph from.”

He estimates he shot up to 1,800 images that day, then spent the next several months editing them down to the 50 or so images that make up the final print. There’s nothing automated about the shooting, and it’s not a time lapse. Wilkes watches the scene closely and presses the shutter each time.

“It’s sort of the complete opposite of the idea of instant,” he says. “I have an iPhone and I take iPhone pictures all the time, but what I do in this work is almost a meditative study of a place. My eyes never really leave the scene for 18 hours. I’m deeply looking at things, and when you do that, you begin to see things and narratives emerge that you never notice just by taking a picture and walking away.”

Wilkes, who’s known around the world for his fine art, documentary and commercial photography, began the Day To Night series in 2009, when he was hired to shoot the completion of the High Line walking trail in New York City. It led to the creation of other images of iconic New York sights before Wilkes turned his lens to locations in the rest of the U.S. and then some of the world’s most famous spots. As the project evolved, so did his vision.

“I realized I had somehow stepped into this really unique way of looking at time in a photograph,” he says. “One of the things you’ll see in my work is I’ve always been a student of history. To be able to slowly inject history into this series has been truly exciting, and I think Canada 150 was really something that was a perfect intersection between my ability to do this work over the last nine years, my craft and technique, and also embracing the element of history in so many of my latest works. I say I’m a relentless collector of magical moments, and it was a real thrill to be able to capture this important moment in Canada’s history.”

As for his experience in Ottawa, he loved it and was impressed by the resilience of celebrants, who were prepared for the day’s wild weather.

“New Yorkers are pretty diehard, but most of them would not have stayed outside as long as everybody did that day. I tell you, it was pretty impressive,” Wilkes says. “What I loved about the day was the energy you could feel in the crowd. No matter how wet it was, how inclement, the people were enthusiastic and happy, never down. I remember walking the streets afterwards, and at midnight, it was like the party was just beginning.”

The work was accepted by the National Gallery on behalf of the people of Canada, and it will be included in Wilkes’ forthcoming Day To Night book, to be published next year. Wilkes is also the first speaker in this season’s Contemporary Conversations series, which begins today.

Stephen Wilkes
Contemporary Conversations
When: Thursday, Nov. 30, 6 p.m.
Where: auditorium, National Gallery of Canada
Free admission

http://ottawacitizen.com/entertainme...17-celebration
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  #116  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2017, 2:07 AM
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Parliament Hill skating rink opens today
Skaters need to book in advance to take a spin on Canada 150 Rink

CBC News Posted: Dec 07, 2017 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Dec 07, 2017 5:28 PM ET




The Canada 150 Rink on Parliament Hill opens to the public today, but don't expect to just show up and start skating. You'll need to book in advance to be able to take a spin on the NHL-size ice surface in the shadow of the Peace Tower.

Passes for the 40-minute skating sessions on Parliament Hill are free and available online two days in advance.

Daily reservations begin at noon, and you can book up to six passes at a time. But don't dawdle — many of the first available slots are already full.

Groups of up to 50 can also book weekend slots by emailing skate@canada150rink.com.

Activities on the rink will include public skating, minor hockey games, ice sport demonstrations and an Ottawa Senators alumni game, according to the Canada 150 Rink website. Most events on the rink will be free and open to the public.

The Canada 150 Rink, which was originally scheduled to open for just three weeks in December, will now remain open until Feb. 25, 2018.
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  #117  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2017, 2:20 AM
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They're over complicating this thing and deterring people from actually using the rink. It's so Ottawa to turn skating on a rink into an unnecessary process. What problem are they trying to avoid?
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  #118  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2017, 4:59 PM
zzptichka zzptichka is online now
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Wonder if there is a separate line for walk-in crowd like they had for Kontinuum. Would be pretty stupid and frustrating if there wasn't and the rink sits half-empty.

Last edited by zzptichka; Dec 8, 2017 at 5:11 PM.
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  #119  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2017, 2:10 PM
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rocketphish rocketphish is online now
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Parliament Hill would have never worked

Bruce Garrioch, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: December 16, 2017 | Last Updated: December 16, 2017 11:12 PM EST




The pictures from the outdoor rink on Parliament Hill have looked pretty majestic as part of the preparation’s for Saturday’s NHL 100 Classic at Lansdowne Park.

And, while the Hill was the first choice for the Ottawa Senators to host the Montreal Canadiens for the first outdoor game in club history, deputy commissioner Bill Daly told Postmedia in a one-on-one interview Saturday afternoon it was never close to becoming reality.

That’s because it just wasn’t going to work.

“I’ve seen some pictures and it looks spectacular as everybody expected it would,” said Daly. “But for anybody who thinks it was possible for us to play a National Hockey League game there, I think it’s evidence that it was never going to happen and it was never going to be successful if we tried to make it happen.

“It’s not what it would have been but it has been a good substitute. The pictures are spectacular. A rink on Parliament Hill is a great idea. Playing a game there and trying to accommodate 30,000-plus fans is unrealistic.”

Daly said the logistics wouldn’t work because a pop-up stadium of 30,000 people wasn’t going to work on the Hill plus the government didn’t back the project because of the costs and time involved in building the rink along with the massive security concerns.

“I think it was logistically difficult if not impossible,” Daly said. “It’s possible that it wouldn’t have ever been able to happen. If it was ever able to happen it would have cost a lot of money and more than it would be justified by.

“I understand there’s some criticisms now with the costs associated with the (rink) there now but I understand it’s going to be there until February and I think that’s great and the way to do it but the costs associated are significant.”

The Hill just wouldn’t have been able to handle the temporary stands and everything that went with it.

“There was a discomfort as well with having a stadium complex that close to the head seat of government in Canada. That creates a lot of logistical issues: Bathrooms, concessions and all that stuff was difficult to work through. At the end of the day, the right decisions were made,” said Daly.

The fact the Senators were able to hold the game at Lansdowne after the Grey Cup was here three weeks ago has worked out well.

“All the signs here are really, really positive,” said Daly.

bgarrioch@postmedia.com
twitter.com/sungarrioch

http://ottawacitizen.com/sports/hock...3-554f6f27c21c
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  #120  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2017, 2:27 AM
Catenary Catenary is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketphish View Post

Bruce Garrioch, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: December 16, 2017 | Last Updated: December 16, 2017 11:12 PM EST

Daly said the logistics wouldn’t work because a pop-up stadium of 30,000 people wasn’t going to work on the Hill plus the government didn’t back the project because of the costs and time involved in building the rink along with the massive security concerns.

“I think it was logistically difficult if not impossible,” Daly said. “It’s possible that it wouldn’t have ever been able to happen. If it was ever able to happen it would have cost a lot of money and more than it would be justified by.

“I understand there’s some criticisms now with the costs associated with the (rink) there now but I understand it’s going to be there until February and I think that’s great and the way to do it but the costs associated are significant.”

The Hill just wouldn’t have been able to handle the temporary stands and everything that went with it.

“There was a discomfort as well with having a stadium complex that close to the head seat of government in Canada. That creates a lot of logistical issues: Bathrooms, concessions and all that stuff was difficult to work through. At the end of the day, the right decisions were made,” said Daly.

The fact the Senators were able to hold the game at Lansdowne after the Grey Cup was here three weeks ago has worked out well.

“All the signs here are really, really positive,” said Daly.

http://ottawacitizen.com/sports/hock...3-554f6f27c21c
Having seen Lansdowne over the past few weeks, I can't imagine how things would have worked at the hill. Logistically, Lansdowne was stretched pretty much to the max for Grey Cup and then NHL, and that was with only a 12k increase in attendance over what they usually accommodate. Kitchens, cleaning, loading dock/receiving space, staffing, outdoor and indoor spaced (Arena and Aberdeen), everything has been pushed to the max and utilized as much as possible at TD Place.
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