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  #41  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 9:46 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
No surprise, but not for the reason you think. They're both very close culturally, economically, linguistically to Norway. They even used to be the same country.

I'm sure Savoy and the Bavarian Alps also rank extremely high for the percentage of their residents that has traveled outside the EU; it doesn't mean at all those areas are bad places to live.
No, not at all. And to be fair, these stats are somewhat pre-invasion..

I guess it was the overall EU stat of 44% I found most surprising. If those trips to none-EU European countries were factored out, wonder how much lower it would be?

Probably below the 42% of Americans that at least hold a passport..
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  #42  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by wg_flamip View Post
Sweden and Denmark are both close to Norway, both geographically and culturally. I would imagine that many Swedes and Danes have travelled there. Finland and Austria also border non-EU countries.
.

I never thought of that when I looked at the table, but yeah - Norway and Switzerland are non-EU even if they're not non-European.

After that then it's predictable that the top foreign travellers are the UK and Ireland, especially given that are large number of those people have been to the U.S., and to a lesser degree other places like Australia.
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  #43  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
I would add to the reasons for difference, that because of 1st generation immigrants, and 2nd for that matter, Canadians know far more folks (neighbours/co-workers) who have traveled overseas, making it seem 'normal' and encouraging more of the same.

I also do think 'diversity' matters. Both culturally and linguistically.

New York is very diverse, as is the Bay area.

But after that, many US centres are more limited in their diversity.

This isn't a 'tolerance' thesis, but one about both about fear and novelty.

If you grow up w/folks of every colour and creed you're less likely to worry about the perils of international travel or fear the differences you may encounter.

Also, the variety of peoples raise knowledge/awareness levels of different cultures and travel opportunities.
Don't think this is true though. Name me a major US metro area without its fair share of immigrants. Maybe some smaller Midwestern cities? Besides that, perhaps the cities of the 'Deep South' like Birmingham? Pretty much all big US cities have a sizable Latin American, Middle Eastern and/or Asian community. The smaller cities do not, but that is also the case in Canada.
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  #44  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 10:52 PM
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There's a cool website that allows you to visualize this:

https://www.migrationpolicy.org/prog...ropolitan-area

Some large metros, like Kansas City, Salt Lake City, St Louis, New Orleans, Nashville, Pittsburg, Portland... definitely have far less Immigrants. The only places with large numbers of immigrants and the "famous" large cities, and predominantly the coastal ones.
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  #45  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 3:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I never thought of that when I looked at the table, but yeah - Norway and Switzerland are non-EU even if they're not non-European.
Scandinavians are definitely the "more travelling" of them all, by that metric:

Denmark - 75% have been outside the EU
Sweden - 85%! " " " "
Norway - 100%!!! " " " "
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  #46  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 6:22 PM
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Originally Posted by FFX-ME View Post
There's a cool website that allows you to visualize this:

https://www.migrationpolicy.org/prog...ropolitan-area

Some large metros, like Kansas City, Salt Lake City, St Louis, New Orleans, Nashville, Pittsburg, Portland... definitely have far less Immigrants. The only places with large numbers of immigrants and the "famous" large cities, and predominantly the coastal ones.
Awesome find...but isn't this the same with our own cities in Canada? Our "medium-sized cities" like Quebec City, Winnipeg and Victoria have far fewer immigrants than Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal.
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  #47  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 1:39 AM
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If anything, immigrants are probably more concentrated in Canadian cities than American ones.

Another thing to ask about immigration's relationship to travel, as brought up, is whether the influence of international travel is really only confined to the first generation who has familiarity with travel while the second, third generation and further shows relative indifference to the world overseas.

For example, if one city is say 20% foreign born, then is the difference merely explained by that 20% of the populace that travels around or back and forth to their country of birth/origin, while the rest of the 80% who are native-born don't travel much at all? Or does increasing exposure to the foreign-born population or cosmopolitanism within the city also entice the non-foreign born to want to travel too, or make second, third-and-further generation Canadians/Americans want to connect to their roots as well?
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  #48  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 4:50 AM
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Originally Posted by chris View Post
Don't think this is true though. Name me a major US metro area without its fair share of immigrants. Maybe some smaller Midwestern cities? Besides that, perhaps the cities of the 'Deep South' like Birmingham? Pretty much all big US cities have a sizable Latin American, Middle Eastern and/or Asian community. The smaller cities do not, but that is also the case in Canada.
I've read that Cincinnati, Ohio might be a large city that fits that. Metro population is 2.1 million. Similar size to Metro Vancouver I think?
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