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  #1221  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2017, 11:30 AM
L'homard L'homard is offline
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I enjoy their buffets. I hear a lot of whining from Facebook warriors about Maple Leaf but whenever I go there I find the service exceptional and the prices reasonable given the huge roster of choices, and when I leave I'm a happy fat boy.
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  #1222  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2017, 4:15 PM
Mapleton_Roadie Mapleton_Roadie is offline
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Hustle is reporting that 3 locations have been chosen for the new CanabisNB Retail stores.

Choice Properties – 165 Main St. (Superstore complex)
Mapleton Holdings Inc. – 40 Wyse St. (near Costco)
Perfection Realty – 780 Dieppe Blvd.
Close to Costco......perfect big ole bags of doritos close by
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  #1223  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 1:19 AM
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The Ego tattoo and hairstyling boutique on Mountain Road has suddenly closed.

This will now leave two vacant CRUs at Hastings Ridge. This is too bad, the shopping plaza had previously been at full occupancy.
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  #1224  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 3:21 AM
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This plan showing a proposed expansion of the Mountain Way Estates subdivision is taken from the January Moncton PAC agenda.



Of note is the fact that it shows the precise location for the new Moncton North anglophone middle school. As I predicted, the school will back directly on the Northwest Trail which will be terrific for kids walking or cycling to the school as they will be completely able to avoid street traffic.

Also of note is the fact that Maplehurst Drive will be extended all the way through to Ryan Street. Maplehurst therefore will be a rare connector directly from Mountain Road to Ryan.

There is also a proposal for a 120 unit multi unit dwelling, possibly a residential care facility.
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  #1225  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 5:34 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
This plan showing a proposed expansion of the Mountain Way Estates subdivision is taken from the January Moncton PAC agenda.



Of note is the fact that it shows the precise location for the new Moncton North anglophone middle school. As I predicted, the school will back directly on the Northwest Trail which will be terrific for kids walking or cycling to the school as they will be completely able to avoid street traffic.

Also of note is the fact that Maplehurst Drive will be extended all the way through to Ryan Street. Maplehurst therefore will be a rare connector directly from Mountain Road to Ryan.

There is also a proposal for a 120 unit multi unit dwelling, possibly a residential care facility.
Yes, and no when it comes to children being able to avoid trafic most runs to the school will be 99.9% trafic free because you have to keep in mind the trail does cross roads, and I say no on other areas because children will have to use some roadways

I also noticed that there is what seems to be a new townhouse complex design North East of Maplehurst, and Future Street B across from the proposed daycare centre that would sit at the corner of Maplehurst, and Future Street B, and back onto the proposed 120 unit care facility.

Note:From the way it has been listed as apartments, and Residential care facility one could assume that they are aiming for something along the lines of 110-114 Murphy Ave. Also known as Manoir Notre Dame.
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  #1226  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2018, 12:16 PM
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Well seems the new school, daycare, and residential project on, and around Maplehurst Dr, and Ryan St is finally one step closer.

Public meetings will be held February 20th at 5PM

The Topics at hand

The rezoning of lot PID 7062974, and a portion of PID 7067344 from R2 (2 Unit dwelling) to a Mix of R3 (Multi unit dwelling) RM (Residential Mix), and P-1 (Comunity use).

And also the property located at 329 Ryan St. the change the zoning from R2 (2 Unit dwelling) to P-1 Comunity use.

329's P-1 zoning change will be for the new daycare, and for the other lots the P-1 zoning change will be for the new school.

I don't think there will be very many people against the zoning change.


Also it seems they might be ussing similar plans to the Northrop Frye School further down Ryan St. for the new one so will see how well this is going to go seeing as the school will potencialy be built with the little street between 316-326 Maplehurst as it's entrance Think it's called Windcrest Street.
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  #1227  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2018, 1:55 PM
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Also it seems they might be ussing similar plans to the Northrop Frye School further down Ryan St. for the new one so will see how well this is going to go seeing as the school will potencialy be built with the little street between 316-326 Maplehurst as it's entrance Think it's called Windcrest Street.
There will be two vehicular access points to the school - Windcrest as you pointed out and also Teaberry. I suspect that they will connect and form a drop-off loop in front of the school.

There will also be two pedestrian access points to the school, one off of the Northwest Trail (probably an extension to the connector trail next to the water tower), and another off of "Future Street (C)"

Aside from this, the new middle school will be completely hidden from view in behind residential housing and the Northwest Trail. It'll be a bit strange in some ways for the school to have no street presence at all, but the majority of the anglophone high schools in the area (BMHS, RHS, MHS) also are hidden off the street grid (albeit in each case within a sylvan glade rather than surrounded by housing).

I hope you're wrong about the new school being a clone of Northrup Frye. That school is very nice on the inside and has all the latest amenities, but architecturally, it's less inspiring than the new regional correctional facility in Shediac.
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  #1228  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2018, 7:56 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
There will be two vehicular access points to the school - Windcrest as you pointed out and also Teaberry. I suspect that they will connect and form a drop-off loop in front of the school.

There will also be two pedestrian access points to the school, one off of the Northwest Trail (probably an extension to the connector trail next to the water tower), and another off of "Future Street (C)"

Aside from this, the new middle school will be completely hidden from view in behind residential housing and the Northwest Trail. It'll be a bit strange in some ways for the school to have no street presence at all, but the majority of the anglophone high schools in the area (BMHS, RHS, MHS) also are hidden off the street grid (albeit in each case within a sylvan glade rather than surrounded by housing).

I hope you're wrong about the new school being a clone of Northrup Frye. That school is very nice on the inside and has all the latest amenities, but architecturally, it's less inspiring than the new regional correctional facility in Shediac.
Well thanks forthe laugh. At least it will be hidden behind the housing, and awayfrom view. I meant floor plan, and where the field, and parking are located, and not the material, and lack of windows. I never understood whythey could have schools that seem to have so few windows. I doubt they will make it 100% the same as Northrup Frye.
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  #1229  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2018, 9:29 PM
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Well thanks forthe laugh. At least it will be hidden behind the housing, and awayfrom view. I meant floor plan, and where the field, and parking are located, and not the material, and lack of windows. I never understood whythey could have schools that seem to have so few windows. I doubt they will make it 100% the same as Northrup Frye.
My main problem with Northrup Frye is that the ass end of the school (the double gymnasium) faces Ryan Street (hence the absence of windows). The classroom wing is to the back of the property. It is this orientation of the building which makes it look like some form of communist re-education facility.

I suppose there may be a reason why they decided to do this. maybe they thought that if the classroom wing faced Ryan Street that this would be a distraction for the students - I don't know.........
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  #1230  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2018, 2:49 PM
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The thing I like about the Mountain Way Estates plan is that they are moving away from the typical suburban monoculture of detached single family homes on winding streets and cul-de sacs.

Now, there is a single cul-de sac in the development and "future street C" still has a pretty awkward configuration (necessary I imagine because of the footprint required by the school) but the monoculture has been disrupted. Don't get me wrong - I don't have a particular problem with cul-de-sacs (I live on one), and winding streets can have an important traffic calming function, but too many of them can overwhelm a subdivision and make it difficult to get from point "A" to point "B".

The Mountain Way plan includes a school (the heart of any community), as well as townhouses (including rental townhouses) and room for an apartment building (or residential care facility) and a daycare. There is a trail which will interconnect with the Northwest Trail, a playground/park and a natural area for storm water runoff. This subdivision will be more than just another cookie-cutter bedroom community.

The only thing missing is a "corner store". I'm a big proponent of neighbourhood retail, even in far flung suburbs. I like my house on it's cul-de-sac and large double lot, however it's a pain in the ass to have to hop into the car every time I need a loaf of bread or a litre of milk because the nearest "convenience store" is a kilometre away. I would be very happy if there was a corner convenience store within a couple of hundred metres. If there were, I would be walking there several times a week to pick up odd items. Heck, if my children were still of the appropriate age, I'd be sending them on errands to the corner store too (if it were within convenient walking distance). I grew up in downtown Charlottetown and I got sent to the neighbourhood store all the time by my mother and it didn't scar me for life. Why is it that neighbourhood convenience stores are commonplace in denser downtown neighbourhoods but considered a social pariah in the outer suburbs???

People often fret that a neighbourhood convenience store might decrease their property values, but I think that point of view is short sighted and a little selfish. To me, having a neighbourhood shop would actually be a selling feature, especially in today's socially conscious climate and concern over global warming. I would be all for it.

In the above subdivision plan. I think the perfect location for a neighbouring convenience store would be at the intersection of Maplehurst and "future street B". There will already be a day care and a small park at that intersection, why not add in a neighbourhood convenience store on a third corner? You could even have another small business (hairdresser, variety store, take-out) on the fourth corner, This intersection would become the heart of the community.

What do you guys think - is it time for the city to start looking at requiring subdivisions of a certain size to include a neighbourhood retail node?
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  #1231  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 12:32 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post


The thing I like about the Mountain Way Estates plan is that they are moving away from the typical suburban monoculture of detached single family homes on winding streets and cul-de sacs.

Now, there is a single cul-de sac in the development and "future street C" still has a pretty awkward configuration (necessary I imagine because of the footprint required by the school) but the monoculture has been disrupted. Don't get me wrong - I don't have a particular problem with cul-de-sacs (I live on one), and winding streets can have an important traffic calming function, but too many of them can overwhelm a subdivision and make it difficult to get from point "A" to point "B".

The Mountain Way plan includes a school (the heart of any community), as well as townhouses (including rental townhouses) and room for an apartment building (or residential care facility) and a daycare. There is a trail which will interconnect with the Northwest Trail, a playground/park and a natural area for storm water runoff. This subdivision will be more than just another cookie-cutter bedroom community.

The only thing missing is a "corner store". I'm a big proponent of neighbourhood retail, even in far flung suburbs. I like my house on it's cul-de-sac and large double lot, however it's a pain in the ass to have to hop into the car every time I need a loaf of bread or a litre of milk because the nearest "convenience store" is a kilometre away. I would be very happy if there was a corner convenience store within a couple of hundred metres. If there were, I would be walking there several times a week to pick up odd items. Heck, if my children were still of the appropriate age, I'd be sending them on errands to the corner store too (if it were within convenient walking distance). I grew up in downtown Charlottetown and I got sent to the neighbourhood store all the time by my mother and it didn't scar me for life. Why is it that neighbourhood convenience stores are commonplace in denser downtown neighbourhoods but considered a social pariah in the outer suburbs???

People often fret that a neighbourhood convenience store might decrease their property values, but I think that point of view is short sighted and a little selfish. To me, having a neighbourhood shop would actually be a selling feature, especially in today's socially conscious climate and concern over global warming. I would be all for it.

In the above subdivision plan. I think the perfect location for a neighbouring convenience store would be at the intersection of Maplehurst and "future street B". There will already be a day care and a small park at that intersection, why not add in a neighbourhood convenience store on a third corner? You could even have another small business (hairdresser, variety store, take-out) on the fourth corner, This intersection would become the heart of the community.

What do you guys think - is it time for the city to start looking at requiring subdivisions of a certain size to include a neighbourhood retail node?
Every neighborhood I've lived in there was a Convenience store Hairdresser, and some mom, and pop Take out restaurant ussually with a few tables, and chairs where some people would either sit with the owners if they where not to busy, or if they had 2 working the kitchen they would sit, and take there break there. But I think what has happen. I can remember all the Stores names but the Cudmore on convenience store, and others had been caught selling native smokes they got cheap at full price, and ended up having to shut down. Some convenience stores manage to stay open when people (Mostly retirees) decided to buy them, and run them giving local teens a place to work a few hours here, and there, and a place that was closer to pick up that loaf of bread, milk, or whatever else you needed. Look at the Area knows as Uper Parkton, Birchmount. there use to be 10 Convenience stores that where of walking distance Ayer, and Dunn's where taken over by family members(there Children) unti'll the kids sold Dunn's, now knows as AK Convenience. But at least it's still run as a convenience store Chubby's is only still open because the family who worked there for the owner took over the ownership, there are , or 3 stores that closed down in the area, and I think 2nd Street convenience is on it's way out the door. Something that I've noticed is when the original owners die now people are quick to sell, and it's rare that the person will purchase it to run it as a convenience store. Most convenience stores that are still being run are done so by newcomers (Majority of Downtown Convenience stores).

I would love to see the city push for the old development style to be the curent culture.
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  #1232  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 1:26 PM
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According to the Holiday Inn website, the new Holiday on Mapleton will be called Holiday Inn & Suites Moncton North and will open on July 25, 2018 (per the website, rooms are available starting on that date). Wonder when we will hear about the attached restaurants planned with this project.
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  #1233  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 3:53 PM
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We drove by Lotus Vienamese last night and my wife said it appeared empty inside, has the place closed? It was never exactly busy but I'm not finding anything to indicate they have closed.

Maple Leaf Seafood is close to opening, signage is up, hiring staff and they have a Facebook page now with sample food pictures added last week. It looks tasty, bit of an Asian look that would make it different from Skipper Jack's normal (sweet sweet delicious brown food) fare.
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  #1234  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 5:35 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Why is it that neighbourhood convenience stores are commonplace in denser downtown neighbourhoods but considered a social pariah in the outer suburbs???
I think you've answered your own question. I don't think they're considered a social pariah as much as they just aren't sustainable in those types of neighbourhoods. Despite the presence of some multiunit buildings that neighbourhood is not very dense at all. In theory a small mixed-use node at the intersection of Maplehurst and Future Street B would be awesome. However, the location and the design of the surrounding neighbourhoods means that its appeal would be limited to a relatively small segment of the area's population.
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  #1235  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2018, 12:59 AM
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I think you've answered your own question. I don't think they're considered a social pariah as much as they just aren't sustainable in those types of neighbourhoods. Despite the presence of some multiunit buildings that neighbourhood is not very dense at all. In theory a small mixed-use node at the intersection of Maplehurst and Future Street B would be awesome. However, the location and the design of the surrounding neighbourhoods means that its appeal would be limited to a relatively small segment of the area's population.
The problem is property tax, no business can survive these days without significant sales volume and even then it is not easy. Property tax is now approaching the same amount per sqft as the tenants net rent. This is another reason why buildings are constructed cheaply. The nicer the building you construct, the higher the tax appraisal and the more difficult it is to offer affordable tenant rent rates. It is not exactly what one would call a motivating system, unless of course you are a major national or inter-national company who receive tax incentives.
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  #1236  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2018, 8:12 PM
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Here are a couple more documents pertaining to the proposed changes to the Mountain Way Estates subdivision:


Access and Landscaping Plan:

This shows the complete extent of the trail system in the subdivision, and illustrates that virtually every lot will have a treed buffer along its rear property line, separating it from its neighbour



This shows the type of residential units proposed for the subdivision (compact single detached, semi-detached and town home).

I don't think every single family dwelling lot in the subdivision expansion will be "compact", but looking at the plan, some detached lots are a lot narrower than others......
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  #1237  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2018, 11:26 AM
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Those compact homes are ridiculous, I remember seeing some built in Dartmouth a number of years ago (turning right at the intersection where left takes you to MicMac mall) and asking myself who'd buy an eyesore like that.

Has the price of land in Moncton gone up so much that people can only afford to buy either a semi or a 50 feet wide plot of land to build a comical looking house that needs an elevator in it once you turn 60?
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  #1238  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2018, 1:19 PM
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Those compact homes are ridiculous, I remember seeing some built in Dartmouth a number of years ago (turning right at the intersection where left takes you to MicMac mall) and asking myself who'd buy an eyesore like that.

Has the price of land in Moncton gone up so much that people can only afford to buy either a semi or a 50 feet wide plot of land to build a comical looking house that needs an elevator in it once you turn 60?
Well, you can certainly have your opinion on the aesthetics of these smaller homes. I for one have no problem with them. If it gives home owners more options, I see no problem with them. Sales will tell the tale I guess.
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  #1239  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2018, 1:28 PM
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Has the price of land in Moncton gone up so much that people can only afford to buy either a semi or a 50 feet wide plot of land to build a comical looking house that needs an elevator in it once you turn 60?
I do wonder a bit if developers might be missing the market a bit with these houses. On the one hand, this neighbourhood seems to be intended for younger people, with families.

On the other hand, my now-retired parents are looking to downsize to a smaller house, and one of their biggest Wants is a lack of stairs. Their current house (the one I grew up in) is 3 stories; bedrooms at top, kitchen dining/living in the middle, family/laundry at the bottom + a basement. After 30-some years, they're tired of climbing stairs.

The problem they're having is everywhere they are looking, there isn't much of a supply for (smaller) single level homes. Everything on the market (not necessarily the Moncton Market) is multiple stories. With the aging Maritime population, maybe the developers aren't quite making the right homes?
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  #1240  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2018, 1:33 PM
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I think you've answered your own question. I don't think they're considered a social pariah as much as they just aren't sustainable in those types of neighbourhoods. Despite the presence of some multiunit buildings that neighbourhood is not very dense at all. In theory a small mixed-use node at the intersection of Maplehurst and Future Street B would be awesome. However, the location and the design of the surrounding neighbourhoods means that its appeal would be limited to a relatively small segment of the area's population.
With cigarettes being priced through the roof, stores being open on Sundays, no alcohol being allowed to be sold in corner stores, gambling machines taken out and if you don't have gas pumps, how can a corner store make money? The Bob's Variety corner store has been on the decline for many years around here. If you don't have another draw like a bakery or butcher or whatever, it's really hard to make a living owning a convenience store.
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