HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #21  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 11:14 PM
speedog's Avatar
speedog speedog is offline
Moran supreme
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boris2k7 View Post
Calgary's downtown moved about 2 km northwest from Inglewood (then East Calgary), which was our de facto downtown from roughly 1875 to 1886, when a fire ravaged the community. This fire was the same one that made the city introduce ordinances which forced the use of our naturally abundant sandstone in big buildings. Settlement started east of the Elbow River because the land on the opposite site (including, of course, Fort Calgary), was originally reserved for the government. The coming of the railway changed all that.
The 1886 fires actually occurred where the current downtown is - Calgary was never incorporated until 1884 and at that time it's downtown was already where it currently is. Yes, the settlement of Calgary was originally east of the Elbow River in what is now called Inglewood but when Calgary officially became a place it was situated where downtown now is.
__________________
Just a wee bit below average prairie boy in Canada's third largest city and fourth largest CMA
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2017, 12:53 AM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,269
Quote:
Originally Posted by esquire View Post
I always thought of Winnipeg as having two downtowns... there is the old original downtown consisting of Portage and Main at the south end, the CP station at the north and the stretch of north Main (around City Hall) being at the core of it.

Then over the years the old Hudson's Bay Reserve SW of P&M really became the heart of downtown. That was especially the case once Eaton's and then later The Bay and a bunch of other retailers set up shop around there.

Here's a map of downtown... the red circle is a rough estimation of 'old downtown' while the green circle represents the new.

When you go to the 'old downtown' there is very little new commercial development. Anything built in the last 75 years is mostly publicly funded with the exception of the Portage and Main skyscrapers, although there are a lot of commercial functions occupying those older buildings.

no it started by the fort. the cpr station did creat another buisnes distrcit to rise up from the pointdouglas area that was sorta there already and grew towards the fort
the are by the fort was where the more wealthy folks settled had more demolition and replacement wheres the north part was where the imigrints went and settled so theres an older building stock up there mixed in with industrial
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2017, 3:34 AM
esquire's Avatar
esquire esquire is online now
Think about Winnipeg.
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,930
^ Fair enough, I suppose I should have stretched the red oval a bit further down along Main Street toward Broadway.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #24  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 5:28 AM
ue ue is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Notleygrad, Albertastan
Posts: 8,793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldrsx View Post
Edmonton is about the same give or take since 101st/Jasper was more or less always the centre of the modern city.
Wrong. The land that is now downtown Edmonton was originally apart of the Hudson's Bay Company reserve and the original townsite for Edmonton was at Jasper Ave east of 97th. The Quarters was the original heart, and as the reserve land was bought, the downtown shifted west to where it now rests, at 101st and Jasper.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #25  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 3:51 PM
hipster duck's Avatar
hipster duck hipster duck is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Car-oriented Toronto
Posts: 1,770
Quote:
Originally Posted by esquire View Post
OT, but downtown Winnipeg has one of the most interesting street layouts in North America.

Strict grids are considered holy by people who misinterpret Jane Jacobs, but they're kind of boring, since they don't allow for view termini, or interesting wedge-shaped buildings, or triangular public squares.

They're also not that great for walkability. You have to make a bunch of zig zags to get to your destination and have to look for traffic from all 4 sides, as opposed to just 2 or 3.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #26  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 4:12 PM
esquire's Avatar
esquire esquire is online now
Think about Winnipeg.
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,930
^ I like our street layout, but the one big knock on it is that the blocks south of Portage Avenue are way too long. I don't know what they were thinking when they laid them out 125 or so years ago, but it would have been much better had they been 2/3 as long. The older parts north of Portage are at a much more human scale.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #27  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2017, 7:06 PM
manny_santos's Avatar
manny_santos manny_santos is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Willowdale
Posts: 3,196
London's has moved further north over time, IMO. Historically downtown was Dundas Street, with the main intersection being at Richmond, back when that corner had Simpson's, and much other retail. Today it's more Richmond Street, but north of Dundas going to at least the CP tracks. That's where you have Victoria Park and Richmond Row.

A downtown that hasn't really moved at all is Kingston.
__________________
Help control the pet population, have your pets spayed or neutered.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #28  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2017, 8:13 PM
riverviewer's Avatar
riverviewer riverviewer is offline
Random Contributor
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: The "great" part of Greater Moncton
Posts: 255
Moncton's downtown covers almost all of the original town from 1881. It has shifted south to the waterfront and has built over the original dockyards and rail yards.


from Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library. No restrictions.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #29  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2017, 8:50 PM
Pinion Pinion is offline
See ya down under, mates
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,168
Quote:
Originally Posted by esquire View Post
^ I like our street layout, but the one big knock on it is that the blocks south of Portage Avenue are way too long. I don't know what they were thinking when they laid them out 125 or so years ago, but it would have been much better had they been 2/3 as long. The older parts north of Portage are at a much more human scale.
We have the same problem in the City of North Van, which is one of the older parts of Vancouver at also around 125 years old. I bought when I didn't own a car and before Google Maps and thought three blocks to the seabus sounded great, but it's actually a 20 minute walk because the blocks are three times the size of Vancouver blocks.

These days they're doing mega-wide condos that span the entire mega-blocks. This is one connected building made to look like several:

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #30  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 7:54 PM
megadude megadude is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 468
This is not historical, and it's not really shifting as it's being created from scratch, but Downtown Markham will be an official thing now.

Previously, you'd probably consider Old Markham along Markham Rd/Hwy 48 to be Downtown Markham as it most resembles what a small city's downtown would look like. Unionville has similar aspects but is smaller and seems too posh to be a downtown.


Sean Marhsall on Flikr.


http://blog.lokafy.com/visit-historical-unionville/



This is what Downtown Markham will be like. Right now maybe 1/3 of it at most is built.


http://www.downtownmarkham.ca/about
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #31  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 8:03 PM
megadude megadude is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 468
Just like Markham, nearby Vaughan was also an amalgamation of small towns and there never ended up being a Downtown Vaughan. By default you could say it was Old Woodbridge.


https://www.pinterest.ca/pin/562598178428959777/


This will be the new Downtown Vaughan aka Vaughan Metropolitan Centre (rendering obviously). New Subway extension just opened there.


City of Vaughan
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #32  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 8:07 PM
CanSpice's Avatar
CanSpice CanSpice is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 1,264
Quote:
Originally Posted by megadude View Post
This will be the new Downtown Vaughan aka Vaughan Metropolitan Centre (rendering obviously). New Subway extension just opened there.
That's a shame about the giant highway running right through the middle of it. I looked at that rendering and shuddered. Ugh, those are killers for downtowns.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #33  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 8:12 PM
megadude megadude is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanSpice View Post
That's a shame about the giant highway running right through the middle of it. I looked at that rendering and shuddered. Ugh, those are killers for downtowns.
I'm also not a fan of that.

Modelled after Buenos Aires? Though these are shorter historic buildings.


Getty Images
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #34  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 11:46 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 14,026
Av 9 de julio. Paseo de la Reforma. Av des Champs Elysees. Broad streets that turned the cores of BA, Mexico City, and Paris into desolate wastelands .....
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 8:36 AM
kool maudit's Avatar
kool maudit kool maudit is offline
what it is
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Helsingør
Posts: 10,503
In Copenhagen, the old town (within the former walls and gates at Vesterport, Nørreport, and Østerport) remains the centre but it is a bit touristy. In terms of major commercial activity, it is the 19th-century area immediately surrounding the gates, and particularly around the old Vesterport, that is the focus of most peoples' commutes, for example.

A lot of office activity is now focused on rebuilt areas outside of the immediate centre like Nordhavn, Tuborg Havn, Kalvebod Brygge etc.
__________________
disce pati
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #36  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 2:03 PM
Acajack's Avatar
Acajack Acajack is offline
Monsieur Sainte-Nitouche
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vieux Canada
Posts: 32,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Av 9 de julio. Paseo de la Reforma. Av des Champs Elysees. Broad streets that turned the cores of BA, Mexico City, and Paris into desolate wastelands .....
You're quite right, but it's a very delicate balance to achieve.

Do you really trust a North American suburban municipality like Vaughan to make that happen?
__________________
A pox on both your houses.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #37  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 2:55 PM
niwell's Avatar
niwell niwell is offline
sick transit, gloria
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brockton Village, Toronto
Posts: 7,879
Those wide historic urban boulevards are quite spectacular, but they can still be fairly hostile to the pedestrian in some ways. While fine to walk down, activities will be more limited to one side of the street simply by the fact you can't cross over midblock like you can in a more narrow setting. The areas remain lively due to critical mass, and almost in spite of the street width.

I wouldn't trust any contemporary "grand boulevard", and that includes anything done in Europe.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #38  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 3:01 PM
megadude megadude is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 468
Reading up a little on Mississauga, and when they amalgamated in the mid '70s, they chose a building at Hurontario and Dundas for city hall. And as this was when Square One was just a mall, and Hurontario and Dundas had a bunch of stores on all corners, I guess we could say that was Downtown.

Later on, they moved city hall to SQ1 area and of course built a new one that actually looks like a city hall in 90s. And SQ1 area is surrounded by condos and small office buildings so that's Downtown now as the city itself has stated. Basically shifted up one major road north to Burnhanthorpe. However, no one in Sauga actually says "I'm going to Downtown Mississauga". They might say "I'm going to Square One" even if they don't intend to go to the mall.

It's like that in Vaughan, Caledon, Halton Hills, Pickering and Ajax. There's no downtown. Though in these places the city hasn't specifically said there actually is a downtown like they have in Sauga.


insauga.com


adiseshan shankar / Alamy Stock Photo


http://www.squareonecondos.ca/


This is what Hurontario and Dundas looks like now. Sketchy is a good word to sum it up. Used to play pool around here a lot and you will still see plenty of sketchy people hanging around. And up until a few years ago, there was also a trailer park just to the west of there, hidden behind some businesses. Lease was up and they had to get the hell out of town. Thankfully plans are in the works for re-development of the neighbourhood. Condos will slowly be going up. It makes so much sense with Cooksville GO station being right there.


Rob Beintema/Metroland


Tony Bock Getty Images



This so called downtown may have the city hall and tall buildings, but lacks the charming main street lined with quaint stores on a water setting like neighbouring Oakville and Burlington, also on Lake Ontario.

Mississauga does have that neighbourhood in Port Credit at Hurontario and Lakeshore, where the Credit River meets Lake O. And Streetsville has the same thing but upstream on the Credit River.

But, with a population nearing 800k, downtown might as well be where the tall buildings are. It's just unconventional for a big city's downtown to not be on the water.



James Hackland / Alamy Stock Photo


https://urbantoronto.ca/forum/thread...7x7-3x8.13599/

Last edited by megadude; Jan 5, 2018 at 3:27 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #39  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 3:06 PM
megadude megadude is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 468
Personally I don't like wide boulevards, but when surrounded by charming, historic buildings, the area can still look nice. But I'd still rather see a narrower street. The wide thoroughfare still sticks out like a sore thumb to me.

A wide boulevard lined by modern towers won't look nice IMO.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #40  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 3:12 PM
Beedok Beedok is offline
Exiled Hamiltonian
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 6,398
I don't think Hamilton's really ever moved much.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 8:44 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.