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  #21  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2017, 7:22 PM
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You gat to have superbuildings, supercomputers, supercargarages and super everything bro.

I sound like big gay al
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  #22  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2017, 7:01 PM
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Some of those schemes look shockingly Chinese, from an urban design POV. Is that really where the world is looking for inspiration now...?
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  #23  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2017, 2:44 AM
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The buildings I made might be cool if the long middle building had train stations on the ground floor. Then maybe the second floor was smart cars that were driverless. Then there’s 20 floors that are apartments above those floors.

Also if the blocks are small the buildings are round like in my avatar and not hallow.
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  #24  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2017, 6:39 PM
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Originally Posted by muppet View Post
the easiest way is to actually walk through the traffic tunnel they once thought would only be for cars. The crowd of
people all doing the same thing shows the failure of the scheme.
The problem is that we don't live in the 19th century anymore.

You can call these kinds of multi-level schemes a failure, but we still shop in shopping malls, live in large residential complexes. We drive to these places, and these places receive countless deliveries in large trucks. We're not going back to the city of small independent shopkeepers and little apartment buildings (except in places where this already exists).

So, if you have to design developments on a giant scale, and you have to handle large volumes of cars and trucks, then it makes sense to put the pedestrian realm on a higher level. If you don't, then the pedestrian experience is going to be miserable due to all the vehicles, and then those pedestrians will just start driving too.

Look at the so-called "lifestyle centers" in the US. They attempted to evoke traditional town centers, but since everybody was driving to these new centers, the developers had to give every scrap of open space over to parking. Gone are the plazas, courtyards, gardens, replaced by parking lots. At least with the multi-level developments, the design allows for public space to exist in significant quantity since it sits above all the needed parking and loading docks.

These new developments like the ones in China are a little less hubristic than the Barbican, as they don't require a full-scale demolition and redevelopment of the existing city to function.
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  #25  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 5:25 PM
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to make it more dense the bottom half of the buldings is for offices and the top half is for apartments/ condos. then theres mono rail or elevated rail stops on both sides of the long building. care share is two floors in the long building or it could be more. then pedestrian walkways under the long building, so you dont have to walk all the way around. under the round buildings is parking.

[IMG][/IMG]
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  #26  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 5:31 PM
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le Corbusier was writing extensively on this urban design approach since the late 1920s. I think the OP should read a little history before throwing out these non-novel ideas.
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  #27  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 6:15 PM
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pics?
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  #28  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 2:48 AM
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I think it would be cool having a elevated train stop against a wall and buildings that turn hallow at the top. People probably have thought of it but I don’t see any pics. But I just look on YouTube and Pinterest.
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  #29  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 7:26 PM
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Or the lower half of the building could be for houses. There’s six three story houses for each floor or section. Sorta like a while ago someone made this for me. I can’t embed it because I’m not on my pc and I don’t know my imgur password.

https://imgur.com/gallery/fuf2c
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  #30  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 12:34 AM
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i might be making this 3d

[IMG][/IMG]

Last edited by dubu; Jan 11, 2018 at 3:45 PM.
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  #31  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 7:48 AM
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Has anyone done this type of superblock?
The middle could have a pond or the car share
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  #32  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 2:35 PM
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These things are right out of a mid 20th century dystopia. Or Hong Kong? I don't think you'll get much traction on this forum or in general on this concept.
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  #33  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 3:10 PM
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pics?


Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
These things are right out of a mid 20th century dystopia. Or Hong Kong? I don't think you'll get much traction on this forum or in general on this concept.
Agreed. These are very, very old ideas that have been thoroughly picked apart by urban theorists. Much has been said about the many obvious flaws of this kind of site planning, including what awful places the space between buildings becomes. Jane Jacobs would be a really good place to start. I'm all for hearing out both sides of an argument, but I think many new-urbanist types like you find on this forum have already made up their mind. These kind of distopian spaceship designs make for TERRIBLE places to live (except maybe in space?).
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  #34  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 3:53 PM
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the thing about those buildings is you cant have shops on the ground floor.

with this you have four buildings for buisinesses and four for apartments.
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  #35  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 4:40 PM
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To be honest I kind of like the architecture and I think the walkways and elevated plazas are cool and playful.

I guess the real problem is that these things are so monolithic. Things that are decentralized are usually more resilient.

How many opportunities exist for billion dollar scale developments and how much demand is there at one small slice in time to fill it up? Will the architects vision ever be fully realized or will it be a sad half finished work?

Then when a part of the complex becomes dated or vacant then what? Does it make the rest undesirable? Does the remainder have to shoulder the massive cost? In a normal neighborhood of many individual buildings, you can tear down one and replace it in a continuous process of change, if an entire neighborhood was literally a single interconnected structure that might be hard.

Also what kind of rules are there for residents in an environment like this? Can you cook outside, play music, can you ride a bike, are children allowed to be outside without parent escort? Answer is probably no to all of them to maintain some sort of order. But who really wants to live like that?

And what do politicians or developers see when they see a big superblock complex? Are they tempted to evict everyone and tear it all down because it was a 'failure' or see it as unnatural? But of course property owners in traditional neighborhoods don't have to worry about that.
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  #36  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 6:12 PM
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I was thinking about how this would be nice for something like to demolish a suburb and in its place build this superblock there and have a train. Max 40 stories. Most people would hate it but I think it’s good because you can fit more people and everyone gets a window. Instead of building lots of buildings and not having open space for nature. There’s no point to have it in a downtown. Downtowns don’t care about trees.
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  #37  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 8:23 PM
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I was thinking about how this would be nice for something like to demolish a suburb and in its place build this superblock there and have a train. Max 40 stories. Most people would hate it but I think it’s good because you can fit more people and everyone gets a window. Instead of building lots of buildings and not having open space for nature. There’s no point to have it in a downtown. Downtowns don’t care about trees.
Sha Tin, Hong Kong. Really close to what you are talking about. Worked out ok I think, given the situation.
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  #38  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 8:36 PM
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I’ve seen a bunch of those cities that have a lot of trees. Pretty cool.
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  #39  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2018, 11:01 PM
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they said make portland weird. so i did brah
the four non split in half ones are the shipping container buildings
[IMG][/IMG]
[IMG][/IMG]
this would never go through. out in the suburbs maybe
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  #40  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2018, 3:41 AM
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old hat
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