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  #1941  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2017, 2:25 PM
Neighbor Neighbor is offline
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Originally Posted by One ATLien View Post
I have traveled around the globe too, and Americans are actually more considerate in public, at least than most places I have been to, with the exception of parts of east Asia, and some European countries. Its all relative, compared to Japan, America might look like a mess in some regards, but compared to so many other parts of the world, America is actually a pretty organized place, And Americans are pretty civil for the most part.

Lets be real here, the beltline is still relatively new, probably hundreds of newcomers check it out for the first time everyday, and thousands on the weekends.. You really think they are all going to be aware of beltline etiquette? Like most people are going to research beltline etiquette every time they check it out? Its become somewhat of a tourist attraction, and you see families in droves on the beltline on the weekends, they are not going to strictly adhere to beltline etiquette weather we like it or not, most people, out of towners at least probably wont ever know there is such a thing as beltline etiquette, to them its just a trail you can walk around parts of the city on, they will just follow the general flow of others for the most part.

This is why when I see bikers get angry at pedestrians on the belt line it gets to me.. I've seen cursing and yelling from some bikers now several times.. How arrogant. It's a damn crowded shared space! Obviously for the most part its not going to be a smooth ride for a biker, especially on the weekends. Us locals need to chill out a little bit and be a little more humble. The belt line is new, and being able to walk in the city of Atlanta on this scale is a relatively new phenomena as well, we are not Tokyo or London where you would be able to walk freely all over the city for decades now..

I agree that line markings help greatly, but other than that the best the city can do is perhaps post what beltline etiquette is along the trail, and overtime more and more people will adhere to them, and follow what others are doing.
Well for one, I was not comparing the US to some third or second world nation - I'd assume that you could deduce that from my Japan comparison. Second this isn't rocket science, the expectation set is no different than the same etiquette you'd have if you were driving or using virtually any other mode of transportation for that matter. Slow keep to the right, pass on the left. It's literally that simple.

Perhaps the Beltline is just emblematic of shitty Atlanta drivers who still haven't figured that out. I see slow, inconsiderate drivers in the fast lane of the highway all the time, so I guess we should expect that on the Beltline as well? In any case, the Beltline should be doing more to incentive and promote proper trail etiquette.

I'd also like to point out that the Beltline's sister trail, the Freedom Parkway trail, also has markings separating the sides of the path and I don't hear anyone squealing about that.
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  #1942  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2017, 10:09 PM
One ATLien One ATLien is offline
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Originally Posted by Neighbor View Post
Well for one, I was not comparing the US to some third or second world nation - I'd assume that you could deduce that from my Japan comparison. Second this isn't rocket science, the expectation set is no different than the same etiquette you'd have if you were driving or using virtually any other mode of transportation for that matter. Slow keep to the right, pass on the left. It's literally that simple.

Perhaps the Beltline is just emblematic of shitty Atlanta drivers who still haven't figured that out. I see slow, inconsiderate drivers in the fast lane of the highway all the time, so I guess we should expect that on the Beltline as well? In any case, the Beltline should be doing more to incentive and promote proper trail etiquette.

I'd also like to point out that the Beltline's sister trail, the Freedom Parkway trail, also has markings separating the sides of the path and I don't hear anyone squealing about that.
I agree with you, I am all for path markings.. Whatever can keep trails as efficient and organized as possible.. I'm just saying lets not get ahead of ourselves, urbanity on this scale in Atlanta is still a new thing, people are learning, it will still take some time to be on the level of other world class cities. And driving and walking are 2 very different things, with out getting into details, I wouldn't compare the two.

If there is one thing I learned, there are plenty of bad drivers almost anywhere you go, Miami, LA, San Fran, etc and certainly Atlanta. You should see how chaotic driving is in other countries, not talking about 2nd or 3rd world countries either, look at southern Europe, Italy, Greece for example.

And yea slow drivers on the left lane are pretty annoying to me.. It surprises me how some older people haven't figured out that the left lane is basically the get the **** out of the way lane, and some just don't care. But hey it's life you always except that in public, not everyone is aware or intentionally try to displeasure others. Technology and organization are the cure to all our traffic woes.

Last edited by One ATLien; Dec 19, 2017 at 10:28 PM.
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  #1943  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 9:19 PM
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  #1944  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2018, 11:02 PM
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  #1945  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 8:08 PM
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^ That might be a good one on which to watch 120 Piedmont going up.
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  #1946  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 6:51 PM
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The Curbed article on the Clermont radio tower got me thinking:

What are people's thoughts on Atlanta incorporating more technology among its denser locations?

IMO, I'd love for Atlanta to push for not only better land use, but also more tech public services such as accessible free wi-fi. There's already free wi-fi in Piedmont Park and it would be nice to see it in places along the BeltLine, MARTA stations, bus stops (I realize there's a TON of work to improve our bus stations in general), and high pedestrian areas. And while we are at highly frequented bus stops, lets implement actual shelters and incorporate some real time route/transfer info. This would compliment other initiatives like the North Ave Smart Corridor and really separate Atlanta even further from other southern cities.

I'm trying to think of way of life items that would really make Atlanta even more enticing for people to live here and be more a destination location:

-publicly accessible wi-fi
-real time transit info and bus shelters at highly frequented bus stops and pedestrian locations (imagine if PCM had info about bus routes 102 and 2 arrival times to take you from Ponce de Leon to Midtown)
-better land use for developments and reduce parking minimums
-historical restorations where appropriate
-cross-town bicycle infrastructure
-increased bus headways
-begin construction on new transit lines (whether BRT, LRT, streetcars)
-legalize open container laws, supplemented with increased fees for littering. Crazy that Roswell has this but Atlanta does not.
-legalize recreational marijuana. Go all states rights, personal freedoms, and show the revenue studies of the new tax base to the state legislature and even they might get on board.
-more parks in general: pocket parks, basketball courts, soccer fields, etc.
-Not really up to the city, but encourage more in-town entertainment options such as rooftop restaurants/bars, brewpubs, places with bowling, bocce, table shuffleboard, board games, arcade games, etc. Maybe the city could play a role by lowering taxes/burdens of opening new local businesses
-last but probably one of the highest on my list would be to invest heavily in public education and the arts

What other items would you put on the list?
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  #1947  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2018, 3:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Street Advocate View Post
The Curbed article on the Clermont radio tower got me thinking:

What are people's thoughts on Atlanta incorporating more technology among its denser locations?

IMO, I'd love for Atlanta to push for not only better land use, but also more tech public services such as accessible free wi-fi. There's already free wi-fi in Piedmont Park and it would be nice to see it in places along the BeltLine, MARTA stations, bus stops (I realize there's a TON of work to improve our bus stations in general), and high pedestrian areas. And while we are at highly frequented bus stops, lets implement actual shelters and incorporate some real time route/transfer info. This would compliment other initiatives like the North Ave Smart Corridor and really separate Atlanta even further from other southern cities.

I'm trying to think of way of life items that would really make Atlanta even more enticing for people to live here and be more a destination location:

-publicly accessible wi-fi
-real time transit info and bus shelters at highly frequented bus stops and pedestrian locations (imagine if PCM had info about bus routes 102 and 2 arrival times to take you from Ponce de Leon to Midtown)
-better land use for developments and reduce parking minimums
-historical restorations where appropriate
-cross-town bicycle infrastructure
-increased bus headways
-begin construction on new transit lines (whether BRT, LRT, streetcars)
-legalize open container laws, supplemented with increased fees for littering. Crazy that Roswell has this but Atlanta does not.
-legalize recreational marijuana. Go all states rights, personal freedoms, and show the revenue studies of the new tax base to the state legislature and even they might get on board.
-more parks in general: pocket parks, basketball courts, soccer fields, etc.
-Not really up to the city, but encourage more in-town entertainment options such as rooftop restaurants/bars, brewpubs, places with bowling, bocce, table shuffleboard, board games, arcade games, etc. Maybe the city could play a role by lowering taxes/burdens of opening new local businesses
-last but probably one of the highest on my list would be to invest heavily in public education and the arts

What other items would you put on the list?
Here's a start: https://atlanta.curbed.com/2018/1/8/...mobile-payment
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  #1948  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 5:44 PM
ATLSkyPalaceOwner ATLSkyPalaceOwner is offline
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I was walking along 8th from Peachtree to the new NCR building, and it really struck me what a fantastic impact Alta has made to the area. Along with the work-in-progress 880 building, this area has done almost a complete 180 from where it was 3 or 4 years ago.

Unfortunately, the block bound by 7th and 8th, and Cypress and W. Peachtree is still a bit of an eyesore.



Ecco is a gem, of course, and I know Daiquiri Factory is very busy on the weekends. I have no idea how that gold store stays in business, nor the dry cleaning in that ugly small strip mall. The Belmere is on the verge of being condemned (Google "The Belmere Midtown" if you want to read stories about the 3rd world nature of that place - rats, no water for days, no working heat, no electricity for days, etc.). Everything else is replaceable or won't be missed, in my opinion. Plus there's that ugly transmission tower.

My question is - how come we've never heard about this block being redeveloped? I'm sure there is a way to preserve Ecco - but is this just a case of too many different lots to consolidate? Is there ever any hope that this block can be redeveloped?
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  #1949  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 5:59 PM
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Those cleaners get a ton of business, actually. I’m sure the parcels on yh left/west will sell once the price is right. Has to be around there already. IMO, plenty of room for 3 or 4 developments on that block. I’m hoping it is redeveloped incrementally by different developers to get a fair mix of new buildings. I really hate seeing one development take up the entire block- usually they waste a ton of space.
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  #1950  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2018, 12:42 AM
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I have no idea how that gold store stays in business
Most likely a money laundering operation.
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  #1951  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2018, 11:03 PM
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City moves to give landmark status to H.M. Patterson Funeral Home on Spring Street

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The proposal to give the Patterson Funeral Home – Spring Hill landmark status will be heard by the Atlanta Urban Design Commission at its Wednesday meeting on Jan. 24.

Tim Keane, planning commissioner for the City of Atlanta, said the property is now owned by SCI Management Houston-based, which bought the funeral home from the Patterson family. Because of all the development pressures in Midtown, Keane said the city became concerned the majestic property would be sold and redeveloped.
https://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/...source=twitter

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  #1952  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 1:45 PM
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According to the Wall Street Journal, multi-unit intown residential developments in cities such as Denver are substantially overbuilt but instead of letting the rents crash naturally (Econ 101) they are talking about subsidizing the rents and property taxes which of course will come out of pockets of middle class schmuck taxpayers. We don't have the same problem as Denver (yet), but what do you think?
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  #1953  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 3:58 PM
MARTAisSmarta MARTAisSmarta is offline
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Originally Posted by Libertarian View Post
According to the Wall Street Journal, multi-unit intown residential developments in cities such as Denver are substantially overbuilt but instead of letting the rents crash naturally (Econ 101) they are talking about subsidizing the rents and property taxes which of course will come out of pockets of middle class schmuck taxpayers. We don't have the same problem as Denver (yet), but what do you think?
Can you provide a link to wsj? I can't find it.
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  #1954  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 4:04 PM
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  #1955  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 4:09 PM
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When luxury developers get a subsidy, it creates an incentive for them to build more of what's not needed.
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  #1956  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 6:32 PM
MARTAisSmarta MARTAisSmarta is offline
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Wow. I can't believe that these people have actually made it into power and are considering something this stupid.
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Under a program to be unveiled later this month, the city, along with employers and charitable foundations, will pay the difference between what a lower-income resident can afford and the market rent of an apartment.
So instead of letting rents fall, we will provide subsidies to prop up rent.
Quote:
Residents in this city of roughly 693,000 will receive subsidies to live in the units for two years, during which time a portion of their rent will be put into a savings account that can be used for a down payment.
So the private company has to then accumulate capital for them so they can put a down payment later? So rents will be pushed even higher to account for this, and we are incentivizing owning a home? Two really stupid policies combined, yay!
Quote:
The program has enough money to subsidize 400 units initially, and officials say they have about 100 units signed up so far. The city has requested units in new or recently renovated buildings. The city will do an analysis to ensure landlords charge market rates. City officials expect to spend about $500 a month subsidizing a single person and roughly $900 for a family.
Again we pick winners and losers
Quote:
Denver, for example, has added 12,000 apartments since 2015 and another 22,000 more are under construction, according to CoStar Group Inc. More than 90% of those units are considered luxury, meaning they incorporate higher-end finishes and amenities. There are currently 16,000 vacant units in metropolitan Denver, up 5,500 from three years ago, according to MPF Research.
Quote:
The market for more affordable apartments remains tight. Just 3.4% of units below the median rent in Denver were vacant in 2016, according to a Harvard University analysis of U.S. Census data.
So there are 16,000 vacant units and 22,000 more are under construction. From the numbers it would seem most are above median rent, so as more units come online, the absorption should continue to disappoint.

So basically, they built their way out of a housing crunch, and now they're going to use the government to create a new one. Fun stuff.
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  #1957  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 7:19 PM
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Originally Posted by MARTAisSmarta View Post
Wow. I can't believe that these people have actually made it into power and are considering something this stupid.

So instead of letting rents fall, we will provide subsidies to prop up rent.

So the private company has to then accumulate capital for them so they can put a down payment later? So rents will be pushed even higher to account for this, and we are incentivizing owning a home? Two really stupid policies combined, yay!

Again we pick winners and losers


So there are 16,000 vacant units and 22,000 more are under construction. From the numbers it would seem most are above median rent, so as more units come online, the absorption should continue to disappoint.

So basically, they built their way out of a housing crunch, and now they're going to use the government to create a new one. Fun stuff.
I think I would be OK with this if it was targeted/limited to teachers, police officers and/or military-veterans. But to anyone - Hell no.
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  #1958  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 9:06 PM
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Hanover Buckhead Village have these retail tenants leased: Iberian Pig, Cafe Posh, and Tiff's Treats http://properties.theshoppingcenterg...id:3186/#plans
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  #1959  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 9:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Libertarian View Post
According to the Wall Street Journal, multi-unit intown residential developments in cities such as Denver are substantially overbuilt but instead of letting the rents crash naturally (Econ 101) they are talking about subsidizing the rents and property taxes which of course will come out of pockets of middle class schmuck taxpayers. We don't have the same problem as Denver (yet), but what do you think?
Not surprised at all....I was surprised when I saw a list that shown Denver completing 15k apartments in 2017. I was thinking to myself they don't even have close to the job growth rate to support that many apartments. Generally with luxury multi-family apartments, using the 5 to 1 rule works. For every 5 new jobs, a city/metro can generally add 1 luxury apartment unit and not overbuild. That means to support 15k new apartments, Denver needed to add 75k new jobs to not overbuild. They're not even remotely close to that number. In 2017, they only grew 29k new jobs. Source

This is going to be the reality for many cities in the coming year or two. Too many luxury apartments, not enough mid-rate ones.
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  #1960  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 11:26 PM
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When luxury developers get a subsidy, it creates an incentive for them to build more of what's not needed.

This is about providing affordable housing, NOT propping up rent prices. In a market with 16,000 vacant units, subsidizing 400 of them will have minimal impact on occupancy and rental rates.
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