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  #81  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2016, 5:07 AM
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Burn baby burn! Framework moves ahead
Cross-Laminated Timber passes burn test, and Portland's wooden skyscraper is set for success.



Portland’s showcase of cross-laminated timber, the 12 story Framework building due to rise in the Pearl District at 430 N.W. 10th Ave. has passed a major milestone.

The wood recently passed tests to prove that it could be in a fire for two hours and not burn so much that it would lose its structural integrity. Two hours is the time a high rise must maintain structural integrity. It is also considered adequate time to evacuate a burning building.

The test was of a mass timber assembly using Cross-laminated Timber (CLT) and Glue-laminated timber (glulam), with steel brackets holding them together. Both floor panels and posts/beams were tested.

Although the architects and engineers at Lever and KPFF knew the wood would survive a fire, it had to be tested to be approved by the State of Oregon’s building code.

Tall wood buildings using CLT and glulam have already been permitted in Europe, Australia, and Canada.
...continues at the Business Tribune.
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  #82  
Old Posted Dec 30, 2016, 4:00 AM
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Framework at 430 NW 10th Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

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New 12-story, mixed-use building; five floors of office and five floors of residential over ground floor retail; see comments re: review by State of Oregon Building Codes Division;
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  #83  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2017, 9:14 PM
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Framework expected to get their permit this month, according to tweet by DJC reporter Garrett Andrews. Given that it'll be the first high rise CLT building in the US (Carbon12 is just short of what the building code considers to be 'high rise') that's a remarkable fast permit turnaround.
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  #84  
Old Posted May 24, 2017, 7:34 AM
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No permit issued yet, but when I walked past the site earlier this evening I noticed Albina Bank have vacated the existing building.
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  #85  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 5:29 PM
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The permit is now "approved to issue".
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  #86  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2017, 7:02 PM
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Timber high-rise planned in Pearl District gets construction permit



An 11-story timber high-rise planned in Portland's Pearl District has been approved for construction, its developers said Tuesday, a milestone for wood technology that could allow for even taller timber buildings.

At 148 feet, the Framework building will be the nation's first high-rise building made of wood. It will house offices for Albina Community Bank and its parent, Beneficial State Bank, as well as subsidized apartments.

The developer, Project^, said construction is expected to begin in the fall at the southeast corner of Northwest 10th Avenue and Glisan Street.

Oregon officials have high hopes for the wood technologies used in the building. They hope it can bring new jobs to the state's flagging timber industry.
...continues at the Oregonian.
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  #87  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2017, 7:38 PM
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My advice: don't read the comments on that Oregonian article (or any Oregonian article, really). The willful ignorance of their comments section is astounding, especially as all of their criticisms are answered by very basic google searches.
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  #88  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2017, 11:21 PM
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City backs timber high-rise with $6M in affordable housing funds
By Jon Bell – Staff Reporter
Portland Business Journal
11/7/17

https://www.bizjournals.com/portland...766&j=79133191
Quote:
The Portland project being billed as the first new high-rise in the country constructed out of wood has landed $6 million from the Portland Housing Bureau for the building's 60 affordable housing units.

In a release, Home Forward, local developer project^ and the team behind the Framework building announced that PHB had awarded the project $6 million from its Fast Starts program. That initiative helps speed up construction of affordable housing units.

"By investing in Framework, our city will now be home to the first skyscraper made from wood in the United States," Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler said in the release. "This project not only reflects Oregon’s leadership in the newly emerging wood products industry of Cross Laminated Timber, it also demonstrates our city’s commitment to finding innovative ways to quickly deliver affordable units during our housing crisis."

PHB selected the project, which landed its building permit back in June, based on its readiness, its alignment with the city's equity goals and its innovation in sustainable materials and earthquake resilience, among other factors. The affordable units in the building will be reserved for households making 60 percent or less of area media income.

...(continues)
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  #89  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2017, 5:12 AM
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Originally Posted by MarkDaMan View Post
City backs timber high-rise with $6M in affordable housing funds
By Jon Bell – Staff Reporter
Portland Business Journal
11/7/17

https://www.bizjournals.com/portland...766&j=79133191
This seriously needs to be what is being built all over the city and surrounding towns. CLT is a great way to lower construction costs and bring affordable housing to the metro.
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  #90  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2017, 7:43 PM
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This seriously needs to be what is being built all over the city and surrounding towns. CLT is a great way to lower construction costs and bring affordable housing to the metro.
If this lowers construction costs, it is not obvious to me ...

https://carbon12pdx.com/plans-pricing/#pricing
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  #91  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2017, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Leo View Post
If this lowers construction costs, it is not obvious to me ...

https://carbon12pdx.com/plans-pricing/#pricing
I quote:
"A correlation between variables does not automatically mean that the change in one variable is the cause of the change in the values of the other variable. Causation indicates that one event is the result of the occurrence of the other event; i.e. there is a causal relationship between the two events."
Real estate valuation is rarely a factor of the construction costs alone. I believe that the reality is that CLT currently has a higher per sf cost than other, more standard, building types. Once the industry catches up to the technology there is the assumption (or hope, depending on ones level of cynicism) that CLT will be a more economical approach to building large structures. Add in the potential for serious carbon taxes (post Trump) and it may become the default position.

I base the above entirely on anecdotal information solely residing in my brain - not from a place of serious research. Curious if others have an opinion.
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  #92  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2017, 1:30 AM
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Originally Posted by eric cantona View Post
I quote:
"A correlation between variables does not automatically mean that the change in one variable is the cause of the change in the values of the other variable. Causation indicates that one event is the result of the occurrence of the other event; i.e. there is a causal relationship between the two events."
Real estate valuation is rarely a factor of the construction costs alone. I believe that the reality is that CLT currently has a higher per sf cost than other, more standard, building types. Once the industry catches up to the technology there is the assumption (or hope, depending on ones level of cynicism) that CLT will be a more economical approach to building large structures. Add in the potential for serious carbon taxes (post Trump) and it may become the default position.

I base the above entirely on anecdotal information solely residing in my brain - not from a place of serious research. Curious if others have an opinion.
We just had an office presentation by Structurlam, a BC CLT manufacturer - they have a rep in Portland. They said that CLT is little bit cheaper than concrete construction (I think they said 4%?) and has a far lower carbon footprint. They also said if you can build with wood stick frame construction you are better off doing that as it will be cheaper and easier.
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  #93  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2017, 7:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Walch View Post
We just had an office presentation by Structurlam, a BC CLT manufacturer - they have a rep in Portland. They said that CLT is little bit cheaper than concrete construction (I think they said 4%?) and has a far lower carbon footprint. They also said if you can build with wood stick frame construction you are better off doing that as it will be cheaper and easier.
That is where the 4 over 1 construction would still win out, CLT would probably be better for taller structures that are 6 floors or higher.
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  #94  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2017, 4:15 PM
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Originally Posted by eric cantona View Post
I quote:
"A correlation between variables does not automatically mean that the change in one variable is the cause of the change in the values of the other variable. Causation indicates that one event is the result of the occurrence of the other event; i.e. there is a causal relationship between the two events."
Real estate valuation is rarely a factor of the construction costs alone. I believe that the reality is that CLT currently has a higher per sf cost than other, more standard, building types. Once the industry catches up to the technology there is the assumption (or hope, depending on ones level of cynicism) that CLT will be a more economical approach to building large structures. Add in the potential for serious carbon taxes (post Trump) and it may become the default position.

I base the above entirely on anecdotal information solely residing in my brain - not from a place of serious research. Curious if others have an opinion.
Oh,I could easily *imagine* that CLT might lower costs in the future. But i can imagine a lot of things. Most discussions of CLT seem to take it for granted that it definitely will lower costs. And that is not obvious to me ...
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  #95  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2017, 1:27 AM
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interesting article built around this project and a few others:

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine...r-land/544146/

and don't forget to enjoy the comments! quite a surly bunch they've attracted at the Atlantic.
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  #96  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2017, 7:49 AM
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Originally Posted by eric cantona View Post

and don't forget to enjoy the comments! quite a surly bunch they've attracted at the Atlantic.
lol A few are fighting the good fight, dispelling myths and conjecture left and right!
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  #97  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 8:36 PM
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Portland's mayor has decided to use public housing money to build Framework (Wweek article).
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  #98  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 9:44 PM
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Portland's mayor has decided to use public housing money to build Framework (Wweek article).
These two paragraphs is why this building is important to get built.

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"In addition to the many known benefits of pioneering cross-laminated timber locally," says Housing Bureau spokeswoman Martha Calhoon, "this new technology has the potential to innovate faster, more efficient affordable housing development in the future."

The timber industry believes cross-laminated timber will revive logging in Oregon, directly creating as many as 6,000 jobs in the state. Its backers also argue it's a more efficient building material, greener than concrete and faster to build with. And cross-laminated timber buildings could be safer in earthquakes than those constructed of other materials.
The first one is always going to be the expensive one, but this form of construction should be a common form in Portland and Oregon. If we could be building housing that uses more local materials and creates jobs in Oregon, then it is exactly what we need to invest in.
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  #99  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 4:16 PM
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Originally Posted by urbanlife View Post
These two paragraphs is why this building is important to get built.



The first one is always going to be the expensive one, but this form of construction should be a common form in Portland and Oregon. If we could be building housing that uses more local materials and creates jobs in Oregon, then it is exactly what we need to invest in.
I love this building. And I hope it gets built. And if the Mayor wants to use affordable housing funds to build it, fine. Just don't come back next year and say we don't have any more money for affordable housing.
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  #100  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 8:42 AM
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I love this building. And I hope it gets built. And if the Mayor wants to use affordable housing funds to build it, fine. Just don't come back next year and say we don't have any more money for affordable housing.
Only a small amount is being used to help this project, plus there is a number of other big affordable housing projects coming up that the city is investing in.
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