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  #241  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 11:13 PM
Tchoupitoulas Tchoupitoulas is offline
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The vast majority of actual French buildings in the French Quarter were indeed destroyed in the Great Fires of 1788 and 1794. The Old Ursuline Convent, however, survived both fires and is now the oldest building in New Orleans and possibly the entire Lower Mississippi Valley. It was built between 1748-52 by French colonials.



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  #242  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 11:31 PM
montréaliste montréaliste is online now
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This image sourced from the City of Quebec archives displays the colonial similarities between New France and Louisiana architecture. This is the Ursulines convent in Quebec City. Founded in 1639, it is the oldest institution dedicated to women's education in North America.

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  #243  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 12:48 AM
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NYC was founded in the 1600's but you'd be hard pressed to find anything there prior to the 19th century.
I don't agree. Most of the buildings that have ever existed in New York were built in the 19th and 20th century, which is why you will really only see stuff that old in the Financial District. The FiDi roughly corresponds to the boundaries of pre-19th century urban New York, and it's pretty easy to find buildings there that were standing before the 19th century.
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  #244  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 1:39 AM
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Originally Posted by montréaliste View Post
This image sourced from the City of Quebec archives displays the colonial similarities between New France and Louisiana architecture. This is the Ursulines convent in Quebec City. Founded in 1639, it is the oldest institution dedicated to women's education in North America.

There is definitely a "Catholic-New France" architectural vernacular that was initially institutional but crept into other sectors like residential in some parts of this continent.

Here is the Collège de St-Boniface in Winnipeg, Manitoba.



And here is the Collège du Sacré-Coeur in Caraquet, New Brunswick.

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  #245  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 9:45 PM
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Some good neighbourhood analogues that come to mind, more so in feel and use, but not without the odd aesthetic similarity either:


Colonia Roma, Mexico City & The Plateau, Montreal

Laid back, leafy streets of ornate old buildings, super cool, and a ton of fantastic restaurants & bars, lots of terraces; wedged between the city centre and more utilitarian, working class neighbourhoods.









Camden Town, London & Queen West, Toronto

Formerly countercultural hotspots of youth culture in the 80s & 90s, they've become more commercialized but still retain a bit of that punky vibe, while also being some of the busiest, most popular shopping districts in their respective cities - with crowds that belie their modest, low-slung appearance.









Soho, London & Soho, New York

Dense, central, signature neighbourhoods. Gritty in the 70s, then fashionable nightlife hubs into the 90s, now home to some of the most desirable real estate in the city and very much on the tourist circuit.







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  #246  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 10:16 PM
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I don't see how the Sohos are particularly similar, outside the name.

One is the theater/drunken shitshow district, the other is a shopping-gallery district with little nightlife. London Soho's NYC analogue would probably be Times Square crossed with the Lower East Side. NYC Soho's London analogue would maybe be Fitzrovia but with lofts?
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  #247  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 11:18 PM
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I don't see how the Sohos are particularly similar, outside the name.

One is the theater/drunken shitshow district, the other is a shopping-gallery district with little nightlife. London Soho's NYC analogue would probably be Times Square crossed with the Lower East Side. NYC Soho's London analogue would maybe be Fitzrovia but with lofts?
No, Soho and SoHo are not alike.

Soho in London is sort of Meatpacking meets LES, I would say. That's probably why they opened NY's Soho House at 14th & 9th, and just opened a second one on Ludlow.

SoHo in NYC, if I had to come up with something, would be Clerkenwell meets Covent Garden (the whole area including Seven Dials, not just the piazza). And sure, maybe a bit of Fitzrovia for the media thing. But when I think of SoHo, it's mostly about the industrial lofts (Clerkenwell) and the fact that it is now primarily an outdoor shopping mall (Covent Garden).



Come to think of it, Covent Garden has lofts too. And there's a Mercer Street.

Leicester Square would be Times Square, but not as bad, because it's smaller.
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  #248  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 11:55 PM
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Fair but based on everything I've heard about Detroit, I don't see it at all. There are no dead spots in inner city Houston (as in the heart of the city, not some random off the beaten track part that happens to have a Houston address).
There are tons of dead spots in inner city Houston. . . probably a third of the blocks inside the inner loop are surface level parking lots and most of downtown is dead after 5 or on weekends. . . most of the architecture outside of downtown Houston or Detroit is SFH with similiar densities. . . both Houston and Detroit have little mass transit to speak of and are dominated by one major industry which probably had much to do with that fact. . .

. . .
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  #249  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 3:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Tom In Chicago View Post
There are tons of dead spots in inner city Houston. . . probably a third of the blocks inside the inner loop are surface level parking lots and most of downtown is dead after 5 or on weekends. . . most of the architecture outside of downtown Houston or Detroit is SFH with similiar densities. . . both Houston and Detroit have little mass transit to speak of and are dominated by one major industry which probably had much to do with that fact. . .

. . .
Okay, it depends on what you refer to as dead. I wouldn't necessarily call a surface lot dead. As much as Houston floods we NEED as many surface lots as possible. That is a reality of Houston.

Yeah, much of the city is dead after 5 p.m. but it's still alive during the day. There are a few subdivisions with limited activity and a few dead strip malls but it's otherwise active. And even those areas usually at least have some level of car traffic.

Finally, Houston is alive and very well. When our industry tanked, we slumped but recovered in a big way. When Detroit's slumped, along with the racial riots, the city's urban core plunged into a death spiral, probably just now stabilizing.
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  #250  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 7:09 AM
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Going off of the French comparisons from before are two cities that have surface analogues that I thought were interesting since I was a kid.

Washington, DC and Paris are very similar in their cores and general layout. Both were designed by early modern urban architects. DC was largely planned by Pierre Charles L'Enfant, who was inspired by the city of Versailles. I think Haussmann in his renovation of Paris was also inspired by Versailles, but I have no evidence for this.

DC is probably the most European-like large city in the US because of its lowrise density, setting on a river with great views, and prominence of government/cultural icons in its skyline. In addition, it is also the nation's capital. DC shares those characteristics with Paris.

Obviously, the major differences between DC and Paris is the population and importance. Washington is not the largest city in the US and mainly is a center for the national government. France's government is present in Paris, but the city is also the major financial and cultural center in the country and Western continental Europe, similar to New York in America. Thus, Paris shares more characteristics with NYC in terms of their roles of dominant world cities.


Major Central Cultural/Tourist Greenspace


Washington (National Mall):

National Mall from plane - Streets of Washington DC by Lukasz, on Flickr



Paris (Champs de Mars):

Champ-de-Mars by Stjepan Felber, on Flickr




Major Museums


Washington (Smithsonian):

Smithsonian by Rose Corrigan, on Flickr



Paris (Lourve):

Lourve #1 by Richard Morgan, on Flickr




Gothic Cathedrals



Washington (National Catjedral):


Washington DC 121 by sillybeans, on Flickr



Paris (Notre Dame):

Paris by fsong_travel, on Flickr




Presidential Residences


Washington (White House):

White House by Dave Hosford, on Flickr



Paris (Palais de l'Élysée):


Palais de l'Élysée/Élysée palace by The traveller and the fox, on Flickr




Highrise Areas Outside City Centers


Washington (Arlington):

Arlington, Virginia by Chris Price, on Flickr



Paris (La Defense):

La Défense by Julianoz Photographies, on Flickr



Still more to come.
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  #251  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 7:29 AM
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I couldn't find any neighborhood analogues between DC and Paris because both cities have different feels. Washington feels very political and current, something like CSPAN or CNN, at its core. Paris seems to be more cultural with the politics being in small nodes, similar to London and other major US cities.


Even though both cities have good lowrise density, Paris is on another level and has apartment buildings in a greater area. Once you get out of downtown, DC is mainly a rowhome city, which may make it similar to London. But even then, the rowhome neighborhoods are pretty urban.


Wide Scenic Avenues


Washington:

Washington DC. by Louis Viennet, on Flickr


looking north up L Street and Massachusetts Avenue NW - Washington DC by Tim Evanson, on Flickr


Connecticut Avenue at Dupont Circle, Washington DC by brunofish, on Flickr



Paris:


Friedland avenue, Paris by Jeanne Menjoulet, on Flickr


Avenues, Paris by Peter uit Haarlem, on Flickr


Paris avenue by City Clock Magazine, on Flickr



Scenic Old Areas at the Rivers


Washington (Georgetown):

.view by fun in photo's, on Flickr



Paris (Ile De La Cité):

île de la cité by andrea, on Flickr



Core Neighborhood Cityscapes


Washington (Dupont Circle):

Dupont Circle 'hood by urbanfabric, on Flickr



Paris (Centre Georges Pompidou)

DESDE EL POMPIDOU (PARÍS) by Sifro González, on Flickr



Curved Metro Stations


Washington:

Washington DC Metro by Patrick Rasenberg, on Flickr



Paris:

Paris Métro Nation by Pascal POGGI, on Flickr




Cycling Culture (Since both cities are very beautiful to cycle in)


Washington:

At Your Leisure 1 by M.V. Jantzen, on Flickr


Paris:

Cycling in Paris by James Scantlebury, on Flickr




Despite Trump inhabiting the Presidency currently and a divided Congress, we have a nice capital. Have yet to visit Paris yet, but from visiting DC and seeing pictures of it throughout my life, there's a strong aesthetic connection between them.



As mentioned before, I might do New York and Paris or start looking at Latin America.
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  #252  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 11:16 AM
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I think though there is a glaring difference even in the built environment between those two -much of Paris is as packed (if not more) than Manhattan, despite being 'lowrise'. It crams it in (I'd regard it more as a midrise centre). In terms of density Paris 55,673 per sq mile (66,000 if you cut out the two massive woodlands on its periphery), DC 9,800 per sq mile. 4 of its suburbs (delineated as separate towns) count in the top 12 densest 'cities' in the world, and the only ones from the West.

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  #253  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by jd3189 View Post
Washington, DC and Paris are very similar in their cores and general layout.
DC and Paris have very different cores and layouts. DC is very spacious and kinda sterile. Paris is cramped, dense and chaotic. DC's layout is entirely planned; the vast majority of Paris has no planning and is just layers of urbanity.

Paris probably has more highrises than any North American city excepting NYC, BTW. And Paris Metro is gritty as hell. There is no exact U.S. analogue to Paris but NYC would likely be the best option.

And, again, the "picture game" is useless. One can use pictures or streetviews to compare any random cities.
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  #254  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 12:26 PM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
DC and Paris have very different cores and layouts. DC is very spacious and kinda sterile. Paris is cramped, dense and chaotic. DC's layout is entirely planned; the vast majority of Paris has no planning and is just layers of urbanity.

Paris probably has more highrises than any North American city excepting NYC, BTW. And Paris Metro is gritty as hell. There is no exact U.S. analogue to Paris but NYC would likely be the best option.

And, again, the "picture game" is useless. One can use pictures or streetviews to compare any random cities.
NYC? What? In that case there is none. I'd go with Boston, Washington or Philly myself. I don't know enough about a small place like an Annapolis or Savannah but they might work as well.

Last edited by ThePhun1; Jan 4, 2018 at 12:37 PM.
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  #255  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 12:32 PM
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NYC? What? In that case there is none.
No offense, but it's quite clear you haven't been to Paris. Paris is super-gritty/messy and packed with third-world immigrants, tourists and global jet setter types. How is it remotely like Annapolis, of all places?

Paris and NYC are definitely most similar, esp. from street level, with similar densities, always two steps from chaos feel, and the constant glamour/grit dichotomy.

Also NYC is the only apartment city in the U.S., really, and Paris is a true apartment city. Both cities dominated by midrise vintage apartment blocks.
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  #256  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 12:48 PM
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The most similar feel to DC downtown I've seen in Europe was in Berlin Mitte around Friedrichstraße and Unter den Linden. (The rest of Berlin is very different, nothing like Washington DC).
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  #257  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 1:44 PM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
NYC? What? In that case there is none. I'd go with Boston, Washington or Philly myself. I don't know enough about a small place like an Annapolis or Savannah but they might work as well.
No, it's definitely New York, or it's nowhere.


I could make arguments for London having as I ts US analogues a mix of Boston, DC and NYC, across different parts of London. Which ones should be fairly obvious. Other parts of London are, of course, like none of the above.
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  #258  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 1:47 PM
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The most similar feel to DC downtown I've seen in Europe was in Berlin Mitte around Friedrichstraße and Unter den Linden. (The rest of Berlin is very different, nothing like Washington DC).
Funny you say that because I've always felt the same way. Both have a uniformly mid-rise vernacular and an architectural mix of old and new; both feel cold, sterile, and at times fascist.
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  #259  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 1:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato Ku View Post
The most similar feel to DC downtown I've seen in Europe was in Berlin Mitte around Friedrichstraße and Unter den Linden. (The rest of Berlin is very different, nothing like Washington DC).
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Funny you say that because I've always felt the same way. Both have a uniformly mid-rise vernacular and an architectural mix of old and new; both feel cold, sterile, and at times fascist.
Agreed.

And unsurprising, really. These are both fairly new cities (because of Berlin's rebuilding and Washington's relatively recent grown), but with old layouts, planned to be grand and monumental. But neither has anywhere near the buzz or activity of Paris, let alone the architectural vernacular.
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  #260  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 1:51 PM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
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No offense, but it's quite clear you haven't been to Paris. Paris is super-gritty/messy and packed with third-world immigrants, tourists and global jet setter types. How is it remotely like Annapolis, of all places?

Paris and NYC are definitely most similar, esp. from street level, with similar densities, always two steps from chaos feel, and the constant glamour/grit dichotomy.

Also NYC is the only apartment city in the U.S., really, and Paris is a true apartment city. Both cities dominated by midrise vintage apartment blocks.
I clearly qualified it by saying I didn't know enough about Annapolis. But for a tiny city, Annapolis has a quaint, European-like charm. It crams 38k into 8 square miles, which doesn't approach Paris but is really dense for a typical American city.
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