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  #11281  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 9:19 PM
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Oh jesus.
Yes, how can I help?

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Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
We have had this discussion before.
Srsly? It must be my aging memory loss. (hehe)
I do enjoy poking you in the ribs on occasion though.
Admittedly, your answers are (almost) always, top notch.
I might disagree some on relevance and context though.
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Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
It's not that it's "bad." It's that in a perfect world you could do a lot better.
Oh... Okay.

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Originally Posted by bunt_q View Post
Frankly, RTD already gets too much money relative to CDOT for what it delivers.
I almost forgot; today is a Big Day in court, eh?
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  #11282  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 10:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeFive
The relevant, poignant question is: "Where do we go from here?"
Agreed. And so the question is not whether FasTracks has delivered as much ridership as I-25. The question is whether the growth pattern of funneling everything around I-25 is what we want going forward. If it's not, then we have to find ways to make our preferred alternatives work. That's what FasTracks is all about, shifting to a different alternative, which even under the best possible circumstances would take decades. And I think we all agree about that. I also think we all agree that the land use component will ultimately determine FasTrack's success or failure. Where I'm not sure we all agree is whether we think the land use component is on track to ultimately succeed, and how much the trade-offs that went into FasTracks' layout will hinder its ultimate success.
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  #11283  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2018, 1:04 AM
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If it's not, then we have to find ways to make our preferred alternatives work. That's what FasTracks is all about, shifting to a different alternative, which even under the best possible circumstances would take decades. And I think we all agree about that. I also think we all agree that the land use component will ultimately determine FasTrack's success or failure. Where I'm not sure we all agree is whether we think the land use component is on track to ultimately succeed, and how much the trade-offs that went into FasTracks' layout will hinder its ultimate success.
Well said but let me add context.

Not something we haven't talked about before but Denver - the city and its inner ring of suburbs... none of it has any particular density. I debated recently with planner-in-progress and he doesn't see Speer Blvd or even So Broadway as having the requisite density for light rail and bemoaned NIMBY resistance. My answer was that you can't just plop down density; it takes decades even in a booming economy. So yes, it all will take time to fulfill it's potential - virtually anywhere in Denver you might prefer.

The 2nd issue is that I've taken a step up on the ladder to look around. You want density sooner or later to be the (only) answer and I contend it's as much of a 'first and last mile' issue.

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It's OK for stations like Nine Mile, that draw from many miles away, to be park-and-ride oriented. This goes to what I've said before: Large park-and-ride stations are fine, it's the small ones that draw from a small area but are still car-oriented that are really lost opportunities.
It was only recently that I learned that Nine Mile has TEN buses feeding into it. Common sense suggests that parking provides roughly a third of the current ridership while the other two-thirds comes via bus. Bingo; first and last mile access solved. I would say that RTD knew well what they were doing.

I think Nine Mile can double their ridership over the next decade which would put it up their where I-25/Broadway station is - today. The redevelopment of the shopping center which will include apartments and additional RTD parking with a bridge to be added over Parker Rd is only part of the reasons.

The SE Corridor stations through the tech center are mostly a destination so while ideal mixed use might be nice, generally the people who would live there wouldn't ride light rail to work because the already (likely) live where they work. I could make other excuses; point being that context is everything.

Ultimately, I'm still interested in and think that the first and last mile access issues can be solved so that having the prototypical station with high density may not be the yuge obstacle the 'planners' insist on making it.

Lastly; I like that gif and bookmarked it - although I had to find it on Google images to do so.
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  #11284  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2018, 7:01 PM
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A Big Fat Curve Ball

The Chess game continues...

Sooo, a couple of days ago the Colorado Senate passed a hard-earned transportation compromise (extracted from the Republicans) by a vote of 35-0. So what did the House do when SB1 arrived? They found a stick of dynamite and blew it to smithereens.

https://www.bizjournals.com/denver/n...-new-road.html
Quote:
House Speaker Crisanta Duran, D-Denver, resisted calls from some in her caucus to move some or all of the transportation-funding money to education, but she insisted it be divided between the state, local governments and a fund for transit to bike lane projects. An amendment added by Duran and Rep. Faith Winter, D-Westminster, divides the allotted $495 million 35 percent to the state, 25 percent to cities, 25 percent to counties and 15 percent to the multi-modal project fund.
A rather cunning move which I didn't see coming.

With an extra $1.3 billion in next year's budget Gov Hickenlooper had recommended a one-time infusion of $500 million for CDOT. Certainly the Senate unanimously thought this was a good idea. But the Dem controlled House had a different idea. They suggest CDOT should receive only 35% of that $500 million... LOL.

Stroke of genius? What I see is a clear message to the Republicans that if you want CDOT to receive the money they need then you need to join with Dems and support a voter initiative for increased taxes and revenue for CDOT. Works for me.

Go Rockies!!!!!!
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  #11285  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2018, 1:35 PM
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It looks like flaggers along the A-Line are ready to be dismissed, and the G-line gets conditional approval: http://www.9news.com/article/news/lo...s/73-532876436
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  #11286  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2018, 7:28 PM
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It looks like flaggers along the A-Line are ready to be dismissed, and the G-line gets conditional approval: http://www.9news.com/article/news/lo...s/73-532876436
Slowly I turned. step by step, inch by inch...
Looks like finally, finally the light at the end of what has been a deep, dark tunnel is in sight.


It's now official
DIA moves back into the top 5 busiest U.S. airports

According FlyDenver:
Quote:
DENVER – March 27, 2018 – After serving nearly 61.4 million passengers in 2017, Denver International Airport
(DEN) has reclaimed the spot for the fifth busiest airport in the United States. This distinction comes on the heels of being voted the “Best Regional Airport: North America” by travelers, according to the prestigious 2018 Skytrax World Airport Awards. Through Skytrax, DEN received several other honors, including:
  • Top-ranked airport in the U.S.
  • No. 5 World’s Best Regional Airport
  • No. 2 Best Airport Staff in North America
Video Link
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  #11287  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2018, 10:05 PM
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Source

Falling transit ridership poses an ‘emergency’ for cities, experts fear
March 24, 2018 By Faiz Siddiqui/WaPo
Quote:
Transit ridership fell in 31 of 35 major metropolitan areas in the United States last year, including the seven cities that serve the majority of riders, with losses largely stemming from buses but punctuated by reliability issues on systems such as Metro, according to an annual overview of public transit usage.
The rationalizations are a bit 'old hat' at this point but not the data.
Quote:
The data also showed 2017 was the lowest year of overall transit ridership since 2005, and bus ridership alone fell 5 percent.
I can appreciate Jarrett Walker.
Quote:
“I think it needs to be considered an emergency,” said Jarrett Walker, a transit planner... “When we don’t share space efficiently, we get in each other’s way. And that is a problem for the livelihood, the viability, the livability and the economy of a city . . . . It means more traffic, more congestion.”
Bus ridership in Denver fell (again) 4.4% last year so it is experiencing the same misery as most places. RTD is likely in better shape than most places, especially when you consider funding meaning at least it's still growing. Still, the challenges/solutions are confounding but neither inexpensive or easy.

I'm looking forward, actually counting on Denveright to provide not only a vision but a basis for determining priorities.
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  #11288  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2018, 4:59 AM
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As one might expect, Canadian cities are doing better than US cities.
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  #11289  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2018, 9:20 PM
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Federal judge declines to halt $2.35 billion I-70 project

https://www.bizjournals.com/denver/n...5-billion.html
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  #11290  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2018, 10:41 PM
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“It’s not over.”


Yeah.... it's over...... lol
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  #11291  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2018, 1:05 AM
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Courtesy Tenor

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Originally Posted by bunt_q View Post
Federal judge declines to halt $2.35 billion I-70 project

https://www.bizjournals.com/denver/n...5-billion.html
As I understand the process and bar that needs to be met this would seem to be the relevant part.
Quote:
But U.S. District Judge William Martinez on Tuesday issued a 20-page decision denying the injunction request, saying “plaintiffs have not shown that they are likely to succeed” on the environmental claims or the claims against the Federal Highway Administration.
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“It’s not over.”


Yeah.... it's over...... lol
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  #11292  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2018, 8:11 PM
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Let's Back up the Bus

It occured to me that some may have missed the recent, key post by PLANSIT whether from all the commotion or doing a Moonwalk in Munich.

If you like BRT and especially if you'd like BRT on Colfax, his pdf link to the recent Community Task Force presentation is really easy peasy to scroll through with good visuals and overview of the process and where things stand.

I still believe that getting this right can set up a better future of better bus service in Denver.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PLANSIT View Post
Two separate but linked efforts:
  1. Alternatives Analysis - Figure out what the transit/multimodal vision for Colfax is. The City is just about done with this as it recommended Center-Running as its Preliminary LPA. Public feedback was positive based on survey results shown last week to the Task Force. Next step is 30% Design, NEPA, and FTA Project Development.
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Last edited by TakeFive; Apr 4, 2018 at 8:23 PM.
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  #11293  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2018, 10:14 PM
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Great news.
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  #11294  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2018, 8:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
OK method two.
  • W - 13,930
I just found a DP article from April 27, 2014 after the W Line had been open about a year.
https://www.denverpost.com/2014/04/2...o-has-critics/
Quote:
“I think we are still in the process of discovery about the line,” said Lakewood Mayor Bob Murphy. “More and more people are riding it every day because they are finding it convenient. There is so much ease and comfort to it.”
I remembered Bob Murphy discussing light rail (but covered by the Sentinel) over the supposed disappointing early ridership but consider this:
Quote:
Since it opened for service, it has averaged 14,000 riders daily, with passenger numbers steadily increasing, according to RTD. By 2030, it is projected the W Line will carry 30,000 passengers daily.
Thought I recalled a much lower number but nvm.

In this case the disappointment is that ridership has apparently not grown from 2014 to now.
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  #11295  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 3:34 PM
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Came across this today and is related to a topic I've been wondering about on almost every trip out to lunch during the week:

https://denver.streetsblog.org/2018/...e-pedestrians/

Can someone to explain to me why we still have pedestrian scrambles in the CBD? I know it's a leftover from the Barnes Dance crossings, but it makes it take more time for everyone to get around to have three cycles at every light, especially when walking diagonally through the city (where in a normal two cycle intersection you can at least cross one way at all times). I don't recall ever having to deal with them in New York, London, or Chicago which have orders of magnitude more pedestrian traffic than Denver. Is it just due to the huge length of crossings and limited experience drivers have dealing with peds downtown compared to other cities?

I find it especially puzzling considering they're looking to limit turns in the future which further reduces the conflicts for peds and turning vehicles.
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  #11296  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 7:49 PM
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In my relatively limited and non-expert experience, pedestrian all-way crossings are often done to benefit drivers more than pedestrians. You put them at intersections where the pedestrian volume is so high that using a normal signal right-turning drivers can only squeeze through one or two per cycle. Making an all-way pedestrian crossing adds wait time for pedestrians in order to give right-turning drivers a cycle to get through in larger numbers.

That's how they've been used in DC. I really don't know about Denver.
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  #11297  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 8:06 PM
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Federal judge declines to halt $2.35 billion I-70 project

https://www.bizjournals.com/denver/n...5-billion.html
I took the time to read through the decision by Judge William Martinez. I don't normally bother since so much is outside of any area of expertise. Interestingly, I was able to follow the gist of the decision quite well. Seemed to me, he totally spanked them and left no opening that could be even worth pursuing. Would they throw good money after bad? Who knows.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ddvmke View Post
Came across this today and is related to a topic I've been wondering about on almost every trip out to lunch during the week:

https://denver.streetsblog.org/2018/...e-pedestrians/

I find it especially puzzling considering they're looking to limit turns in the future which further reduces the conflicts for peds and turning vehicles.
Sorry, I can't answer your question but I found Sach's piece interesting. It's certainly an urban/Streetsblog approach but if there's one area where it makes the most sense it would be downtown. Hard to know in advance how much of a difference this will make. If the changes are easily noticeable it should be interesting to see how everybody accepts them.

I think they also intend to incorporate designated lanes for buses. My guess is that limiting turns would be primarily to keep cars out of the bus lanes.
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  #11298  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2018, 9:54 PM
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So is Cirrus the inspiration behind this vision?


Courtesy Virginia DOT vis WTOP

Notice the bike lanes plus sidewalk as well as future BRT lanes.
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  #11299  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2018, 7:51 PM
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I have only the most tertiary relationship with that project. It's outside my jurisdiction, but is part of some of the region-wide plans that I work on.

US-1 in Northern Virginia is comparable to... oh I dunno... South Federal maybe. It's been strip mall territory for 60 years, but is old and poor and ready for a new look. Probably more importantly, it's one of an ever-dwindling number of places in the DC area with a lot of infill capability and not insurmountable political obstacles. So there you go. So it'll get BRT, which lets the county upzone for TOD, which lets an already sprawled-out county keep growing now that leapfrog isn't possible for them anymore.
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  #11300  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2018, 11:31 PM
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^^ Pretty interesting actually. tertiary - I've always been fond of that word.

Can't wait to see bunt do this:
https://www.denverite.com/i-70-const...-denver-50392/
Quote:
“The viaduct stays up for the first two years of construction,” White said. “I think that’s the most difficult part for people to wrap their heads around.”
Then bunt will go for a dark-of-night jog along the 1.8 mile section of viaducts and push em all down.

Interstate 70 starts construction soon. Here’s what it means for your neighborhood.
Posted on April 9, 2018 by Andrew Kenney/Denveright
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It’s going to be tricky.
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