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  #12101  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2019, 6:50 PM
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New York Times article on the French (from France) invasion in Montreal.

I don't think everything is accurate but it's always interesting to read different perspectives.

Culture Shock for French in Quebec: ‘We Smoke Cigarettes, They Smoke Pot’


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/19/w...in-canada.html
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  #12102  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2019, 6:54 PM
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But Ms. Zimmerlin, 23, who started her own unisex fashion brand, “Kafka,”...
Belly laughed. I like her.
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  #12103  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2019, 7:18 PM
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New York Times article on the French (from France) invasion in Montreal.

I don't think everything is accurate but it's always interesting to read different perspectives.

Culture Shock for French in Quebec: ‘We Smoke Cigarettes, They Smoke Pot’


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/19/w...in-canada.html
Quote:
Mr. Myard, 22, said romance in feminist Quebec also posed challenges for young men reared in “machismo” France.

“I have been glared at for opening the door for a Quebecois woman and once called a Quebecois girl I liked, ‘my little baby,’” he recalled. “She got very annoyed and said, ‘I am not your baby!’”
bahaha
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  #12104  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2019, 7:28 PM
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bahaha
That thing about holding the door is one of the things I'd take issue with in the article. I've been doing that almost daily for 20 years here and I've never had anyone glare at me. Not saying it would never happen (anything can in theory) but IMO it's at least as likely in Paris as it is in Montreal.

OTOH he may have a point about "my little baby" - think about the original version though which would be "mon petit bébé" . It's likely totally acceptable for someone you're in a romantic relationship with, but probably not if she's still just a prospect. Then again, those parameters might also be valid in France AFAIK.
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Old Posted Feb 21, 2019, 9:51 PM
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Petition calls for U.S. to sell Montana to Canada

Jackie Dunham, CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Thursday, February 21, 2019 8:36AM EST

It already borders three Canadian provinces and has a diverse terrain of Rocky Mountains and Great Plains that mirror those in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

So, should the U.S. sell Montana to Canada as one online petition is proposing?

After the U.S. national debt soared to more than $22 trillion earlier this month, a man named Ian Hammond launched a petition on Change.org last week to sell Montana to Canada for $1 trillion to reduce the national debt.

“We have too much debt and Montana is useless,” the proposal reads. “Just tell them it has beavers or something.”

Although the petition appeared to be created in jest, it has already earned more than 12,000 signatures as of Thursday morning.

...

https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/petiti...nada-1.4306271
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  #12106  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2019, 10:05 PM
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Maybe Alberta and Montana can form their own country

'We are getting robbed blind': Billboards call for Alberta to separate

Ryan Flanagan, CTVNews.ca with a report from CTV Calgary's Chris Epp
Published Thursday, February 21, 2019


Anti-Ottawa sentiment in Alberta has reached new heights with the installation of two billboard advertisements in high-visibility locations.

The ads have recently been put on display in Calgary and Edmonton. They ask the question “Should Alberta ditch Canada?” and link to Alberta Fights Back, a website promoting a province-wide referendum on separation.

“We are sick and tired,” campaign director Peter Downing told CTV Calgary.

“Just like an abusive relationship, no self-respecting person would stay in this.”

Western frustrations have been voiced with increasing volume since the downturn in the oil and gas sector began. In the eyes of many Albertans, the federal government has not been doing enough to help prop up one of the country’s largest industries.

An Angus Reid poll released earlier this month found that 73 per cent of people living west of Ontario believe Western Canadian anger and resentment toward the federal government is on the rise.

...

https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/we-are...rate-1.4306265
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  #12107  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2019, 2:28 PM
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Prime Minister's media scrum at Memorial University - every local reporter: Muskrat Falls! Atlantic Accord! Replacement of Her Majesty's Penitentiary! Every national reporter: SNC Lavalin! Interesting to see the difference in priorities.
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  #12108  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2019, 2:46 PM
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Prime Minister's media scrum at Memorial University - every local reporter: Muskrat Falls! Atlantic Accord! Replacement of Her Majesty's Penitentiary! Every national reporter: SNC Lavalin! Interesting to see the difference in priorities.
It's always like that. The PM shows up at local announcements all the time trailed by a pack of national media who have no interest in the matter at hand. Nature of the business.

It does get a little awkward though when the PM is meeting a foreign head of government and all the press questions are about the local Ottawa hot button issue du jour.
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  #12109  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2019, 2:53 PM
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Yeah, it's interesting for sure. News broke today that Ottawa has agreed to allow Japanese fish harvesters to catch 150 tonnes of turbot off our coast, including within a 200-mile limit. To compare, Newfoundlanders are only permitted to harvest 10 tonnes.

I've never seen this level of anger with a Liberal government before. Trudeau has been for rural and fishery-dependent parts of NL what Harper was for the rest of us. I'm curious to see if it impacts election results.
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  #12110  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2019, 8:43 PM
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Anti-hate group considers action against Selvers

Brian Kelly
Published on: February 21, 2019



Dave Selvers particpates in a yellow vest protest on Bay Street in early January. Brian Kelly/Sault Star

Canadian Anti-Hate Network is considering filing a criminal complaint against a Sault Ste. Marie businessman who operates what the group calls a “virulently racist blog.”

Dave Selvers operates Millennium Crane Rentals. He’s also active on Facebook and Son’s of Slavs.

“Racist propaganda, misinformation, and creating the false impression of an imminent threat that must be addressed make tragedies like the Quebec mosque shooting possible,” said Canadian Anti-Hate Network executive director Evan Balgord in an email to The Sault Star. “The best way to prevent so-called lonewolf attacks is to address hate propaganda at its source, reducing the opportunities for radicalization leading to violence.”

His group was alerted to Selvers’s online posts by a supporter. An article about Selvers appeared online at antihate.ca last Sunday.

Selvers is also active organizing yellow-vest demonstrations in the city. The group meets Saturday mornings.

“It’s unsurprising that he was attracted to the Yellow Vests Canada movement as it has drawn together almost every hate group, far-right content creator and neo-Nazi that we monitor,” said Balgord. “We verified the information, saved the entirety of two blogs he operated, and published the story both to inform the public about Dave Selvers and more generally the kinds of people organizing around the Yellow Vests Canada movement.”

...

https://www.saultstar.com/news/local...zI6WJKZ4vDpE44
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  #12111  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2019, 9:47 PM
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I think CBC is trying to blame Trudeau for killing an awful local restaurant...

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  #12112  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2019, 3:29 AM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Yeah, it's interesting for sure. News broke today that Ottawa has agreed to allow Japanese fish harvesters to catch 150 tonnes of turbot off our coast, including within a 200-mile limit. To compare, Newfoundlanders are only permitted to harvest 10 tonnes.

I've never seen this level of anger with a Liberal government before. Trudeau has been for rural and fishery-dependent parts of NL what Harper was for the rest of us. I'm curious to see if it impacts election results.
Broke today? I heard this discussion on CBC radio on Tuesday. There's some anger from the fishers union, though everyone else is trying to swing it as a win-win. I have no idea if it really is or not.

I have seen a lot of anger directed at the Liberal government lately, especially from young to middle-aged rural and urban Newfoundlanders who make up the core of the Liberal support in this province. I can't really pinpoint what would make them so upset though, other than Facebook memes from groups such as "Justin Trudeau is an idiot" or "Yellow Vests Newfoundland". I think we've finally hit that stage where social media is about to influence politics here. You could press these people, and ask them why they feel so negatively about Prime Minister Trudeau, and they'd never be able to give you a coherent answer (sound familiar?), but the hate has been ingrained in their mind already. I predicted this last year, and I'll double down on it: now that Stephen Harper is out of the Conservative party picture, the CPC are about to make considerable gains in NL. It may only amount itself to 1 or 2 seats in the next election, but the tides have been turning, for better or for worse. We're yet another election removed from the "Joey party" and even more of that Joey Liberal mindset have passed away. We're reaching that point in time now where the sway of confederation has considerably less influence on politics as it used to.

I guess to put it in perspective, if an election were to be held today both my parents would be voting Conservative for the first time in their lives. A large number of my friends would be too, though I (or they) can't explain why for any of those situations with a reasonable answer. Have we really been swayed that much by meaningless social media?
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  #12113  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2019, 3:32 AM
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they can keep it

Petition calls for U.S. to sell Montana to Canada

Jackie Dunham, CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Thursday, February 21, 2019 8:36AM EST

It already borders three Canadian provinces and has a diverse terrain of Rocky Mountains and Great Plains that mirror those in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

So, should the U.S. sell Montana to Canada as one online petition is proposing?

After the U.S. national debt soared to more than $22 trillion earlier this month, a man named Ian Hammond launched a petition on Change.org last week to sell Montana to Canada for $1 trillion to reduce the national debt.

“We have too much debt and Montana is useless,” the proposal reads. “Just tell them it has beavers or something.”

Although the petition appeared to be created in jest, it has already earned more than 12,000 signatures as of Thursday morning.

...

https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/petiti...nada-1.4306271

Where would A&W, Montana's (the steakhouse) and others get their beef from then? They'd have to pay "duty" on everything the other states imported from there.


Nonsensical move.
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  #12114  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2019, 8:34 AM
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Broke today? I heard this discussion on CBC radio on Tuesday. There's some anger from the fishers union, though everyone else is trying to swing it as a win-win. I have no idea if it really is or not.

I have seen a lot of anger directed at the Liberal government lately, especially from young to middle-aged rural and urban Newfoundlanders who make up the core of the Liberal support in this province. I can't really pinpoint what would make them so upset though, other than Facebook memes from groups such as "Justin Trudeau is an idiot" or "Yellow Vests Newfoundland". I think we've finally hit that stage where social media is about to influence politics here. You could press these people, and ask them why they feel so negatively about Prime Minister Trudeau, and they'd never be able to give you a coherent answer (sound familiar?), but the hate has been ingrained in their mind already. I predicted this last year, and I'll double down on it: now that Stephen Harper is out of the Conservative party picture, the CPC are about to make considerable gains in NL. It may only amount itself to 1 or 2 seats in the next election, but the tides have been turning, for better or for worse. We're yet another election removed from the "Joey party" and even more of that Joey Liberal mindset have passed away. We're reaching that point in time now where the sway of confederation has considerably less influence on politics as it used to.

I guess to put it in perspective, if an election were to be held today both my parents would be voting Conservative for the first time in their lives. A large number of my friends would be too, though I (or they) can't explain why for any of those situations with a reasonable answer. Have we really been swayed that much by meaningless social media?
Oh sorry I saw the dueling news releases from FFAW and Fish-NL and assumed they were from yesterday.

Yeah, I'm worried. The only comfort is Scheer is a cold fish and the Liberal lead outside St. John's is well-padded. It'll be hard even for a hated Liberal government to lose where they regularly win with up to 80% of the vote.

I'm curious what happens in St. John's. It's a blue city traditionally. Harper single-handedly got them down to single digits. The city, I believe, only went NDP because of Harper hate combined with Confederation-related disdain for the Liberals. The red wave last election was an act of desperation - they even unseated Jack Harris, who carried his riding in St. John's for the NDP with something like 75% the election previous (and barely missed winning again - NDP still got nearly half the vote and Cons we shut out). But that said, Trudeau has strong connections to Newfoundland and the value of that is he gets us. Notice how many times yesterday he stressed his government isn't about mandating solutions from Ottawa, but assisting the provincial government in addressing is priorities and looking to it for solutions with Ottawa's role simply being funding. But he makes mistakes too given national priorities. Everyone noticed his dinner with donors was at a Quebec-owned chain, and a few expressed feeling used or slighted as a result.

NDP provincially and nationally is a mess right now. People don't like Scheer, but he's not Harper, and they seem to hate Trudeau (though lots are fine with status quo, just quietly).

I wouldn't be surprised to see the Liberals lose any or all of: Labrador, Avalon, and the two St. John's ridings
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  #12115  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2019, 9:49 AM
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Lovely retrospective from CBC. Maybe someday it'll be a movie like Spotlight - I believe we were first to face it head on?

The pedestals were washed away: The sex abuse scandals that rocked the church in N.L.

Quote:
...

The front edge of the hurricane struck in January 1988 with the arrest of a Catholic priest, Father Jim Hickey. He was charged with 20 counts of sexually assaulting young boys. Then came the arrests and charges against Father Corrigan, Father Foley, and more.

A writer for the Chicago Tribune called it a "crack in a horrible dike." In St. John's, where the Catholic Church dominated not only the sacred but the secular life of the city, the shock was palpable.

Hickey, the pedophile priest who sent acquaintances and even some victims a Christmas card featuring a photo of him schmoozing with Prince Charles and Princess Diana, was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison.

Others followed, but the Catholic Church seemed to have weathered the storm. A few bad apples and all of that.

...

Then, 30 years ago, in February, 1989 the back of the hurricane struck.

The cover-up of sexual abuse at Mount Cashel orphanage came to an end. It started back in 1975 when the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary investigated complaints about physical and sexual abuse of boys by members of the Irish Christian Brothers who ran the orphanage. A deal was made. Charges were not laid. The brothers quietly left town. Instead the Catholic community celebrated a century of service by the Catholic lay order in a book ironically titled The Brothers Are Coming.

The reason the storm raged on was because a cop said he didn't want to be part of a different cover-up. Sgt. Art Pike disclosed the cover-up during a 1979 judicial inquiry into the leaking of a police report in a matter involving a fire in a provincial cabinet minister's apartment, and allegations of a bribe involving a construction contract.

Pike testified that he leaked the police report because he feared it would be buried like the 1975 sexual abuse investigation at the Mount Cashel orphanage. Ten years later, a CBC reporter stood in front of Mount Cashel orphanage and reminded viewers of Pike's decade-old testimony.

The next day, the CBC report was the subject of a discussion on a VOCM open line radio program.

Carmel Mahoney, the wife of Newfoundland and Labrador Supreme Court justice John Mahoney, heard the discussion. She called her husband in his chambers and asked about the cover-up.

Then the judge called Robert Hyslop, the associate deputy attorney general, and asked what he knew about a cover-up. That call led Hyslop to engage in what a judicial inquiry later described as "a flurry of activity with momentous consequences."

...

Three brothers, Bobby, Greg and Darren Connors, were victims. Greg was 11 years old in 1975. He told the police that one Christian Brother "would sit down on the bed and feel my bird inside my pyjama pants."

Greg and his brother Darren both committed suicide.

Hopefully what will never be forgotten are the words of Supreme Court Justice Leo Barry at the sentencing of Brother Doug Kenny, the superintendent at Mount Cashel orphanage from 1971 to 1976.

Kenny was convicted of assaulting seven boys at the orphanage, prompting Barry to observe, "He preyed in a calculated manner, with utter disregard for their psychological well-being, upon the bodies of young, often-orphan boys who were completely within his control when he was supposed to be looking after their welfare. If anything is the epitome of evil, it is this."

After the storm passed the orphanage was gone, but the Basilica remained.

It was different though.

The pedestals the priests used to stand on had been washed away.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfo...cane-1.5024458

It really amazes me still how quickly everything changed. We were a place where even if you didn't believe in God, you went through the motions because religion was sort of like an ethnicity. You paid attention to what neighbourhoods you were in, married usually among your own kind, etc. And with the sex abuse scandal, all that just faded away. And local pop culture was quick to respond. Like this parody of Eversweet Margarine's commercials:

Video Link
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  #12116  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2019, 2:26 PM
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Oh sorry I saw the dueling news releases from FFAW and Fish-NL and assumed they were from yesterday.

Yeah, I'm worried. The only comfort is Scheer is a cold fish and the Liberal lead outside St. John's is well-padded. It'll be hard even for a hated Liberal government to lose where they regularly win with up to 80% of the vote.

I'm curious what happens in St. John's. It's a blue city traditionally. Harper single-handedly got them down to single digits. The city, I believe, only went NDP because of Harper hate combined with Confederation-related disdain for the Liberals. The red wave last election was an act of desperation - they even unseated Jack Harris, who carried his riding in St. John's for the NDP with something like 75% the election previous (and barely missed winning again - NDP still got nearly half the vote and Cons we shut out). But that said, Trudeau has strong connections to Newfoundland and the value of that is he gets us. Notice how many times yesterday he stressed his government isn't about mandating solutions from Ottawa, but assisting the provincial government in addressing is priorities and looking to it for solutions with Ottawa's role simply being funding. But he makes mistakes too given national priorities. Everyone noticed his dinner with donors was at a Quebec-owned chain, and a few expressed feeling used or slighted as a result.

NDP provincially and nationally is a mess right now. People don't like Scheer, but he's not Harper, and they seem to hate Trudeau (though lots are fine with status quo, just quietly).

I wouldn't be surprised to see the Liberals lose any or all of: Labrador, Avalon, and the two St. John's ridings
The thing is: before the ABC campaign the federal Liberals weren't winning rural ridings by 80%, or anywhere near it. In the last non-ABC Harper election, the largest Liberal victory was 53% of the vote (vs. 31% for the CPC). The closest being 45% (vs 40% for CPC).The difference in that being about 1000 votes.

Then of course Harper and ABC happened. I'm very curious to see what happens in the first election after Harper, if we go back to baseline or not. Baseline is close enough to swinging either way (if the desire for change is there) that even a hand full of people being swayed could change the political landscape immensely. But political mindsets can be hard to change, some old people still vote for Joey's party for christ sake, so the effects of the original ABC campaign could also still be felt.

The NDP are in an interesting situation. They were an absolute dead-in-the-water 3rd place party everywhere up until the 2008 election (aka the ABC election). Jack Harris was already well known and respected, so he was an easy vote (I've voted for him twice). The second election where Cleary also won for the NDP was essentially off the orange wave. Once again, now that there isn't an orange wave, and there isn't strategic voting to take down Harper, I'm curious to see their base support in the province. The NDP are the popular, go-to party of the young activist college student, and there are plenty of them in St. John's to form a decent base support. Very curious where the average person votes though.

I guess since our well has been poisoned for so long it's hard to have a finger on the true pulse of federal politics in the province If I were to take a guess on the next election, I would predict: 1 of the 2 St. John's districts flips (could flip NDP with a strong candidate, but CPC otherwise. I'll predict St. John's East as the one to flip), and one rural riding (Bonavista - Burin - Trinity is a good candidate). The least likely would be whatever riding the west coast/northern peninsula is called now, they eat, sleep, and breathe red.

I know this all belongs in the politics thread
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  #12117  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2019, 12:15 AM
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^^CODCO is still funny. Very, very funny.
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  #12118  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2019, 12:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
New York Times article on the French (from France) invasion in Montreal.

I don't think everything is accurate but it's always interesting to read different perspectives.

Culture Shock for French in Quebec: ‘We Smoke Cigarettes, They Smoke Pot’


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/19/w...in-canada.html
The stuff about culture shock from poutine or saying "tu" sounds very silly and trivial to me.

The most interesting thing was the Legault quote in the linked article where he explicitly says it would be good to have more European immigration and less immigration from other countries. That is not something that would be considered acceptable for a Canadian politician outside of Quebec, and even if you tried to suggest it in an oblique way (completely focused on language, qualifications, etc.) you'd be called a Nazi.

It's important to be careful about generalizing by country of origin or citizenship since individuals vary so much. But I also think it's wrong to completely ignore cultural affinities, or think of immigration as a purely a social justice issue.
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  #12119  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2019, 1:53 AM
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The stuff about culture shock from poutine or saying "tu" sounds very silly and trivial to me.
That's what Europeans are like though. There's their way and everyone else is doing it wrong.

Many of these people are attempting to escape the rigidity of Europe yet seem equally put out when things aren't done the way they're used to. A century ago the English saw anglo America as an extension of themselves. When they realized it wasn't they ridiculed it. Today the French still see French America as an extension of France. They react with similar indignation when they discover that it's not. That Quebec is wealthier and has lower unemployment doesn't go over very well in France either.

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The most interesting thing was the Legault quote in the linked article where he explicitly says it would be good to have more European immigration and less immigration from other countries. That is not something that would be considered acceptable for a Canadian politician outside of Quebec, and even if you tried to suggest it in an oblique way (completely focused on language, qualifications, etc.) you'd be called a Nazi.
Quebec is often viewed as being more liberal than the rest of Canada but this is one area where they're anything but. Protecting language is one thing but the culture should be allowed to change over time just like it does in anglo Canada. Over time the culture would get stronger, more vibrant, and increasingly relevant globally. Attempting to freeze the culture in time would do the opposite. It would turn it into a cultural fossil.
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  #12120  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2019, 3:06 AM
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Quebec is often viewed as being more liberal than the rest of Canada but this is one area where they're anything but. Protecting language is one thing but the culture should be allowed to change over time just like it does in anglo Canada. Over time the culture would get stronger, more vibrant, and increasingly relevant globally. Attempting to freeze the culture in time would do the opposite. It would turn it into a cultural fossil.
Yeah, but even in the unlikely event that we were to do something like only admit immigrants from France, that most definitely wouldn't allow Quebec culture to remain static anyway. People from France in the 21st century aren't the same as the descendants of people who came from France in the 17th century.

The French immigrants that are here or coming here are already altering the culture in Montreal in particular. (In addition to all the other immigrants from other origins too.)

And of course the (also unlikely) "lesser evil" () of only admitting Francophonie immigrants would change the culture too, as the Francophonie is extremely diverse.
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