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  #361  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2019, 3:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
BC doesn't really have anything resembling a regionalized francophone accent. You basically hear the accents of where people came from: Quebec, Acadia, Europe, etc. And with each passing generation it becomes more tinged with English.

The Prairie provinces can be said to have their own accents though. They tend to be quite English-tinged as well (similar to Ontario's) but like Ontario they are variants of the Quebec accent that they are descended from.
No wonder they all have their own accent.

Even in Québec (as a province), I feel that the accent can vary greatly from one place to another, with that in Montreal being the most mixed. Once I get to Centre-du-Québec/Capitale Nationale, I hear “ai” pronounced like “I” in English, which I’ve never heard before.

And, oh yea it’s actuallt quite charming. :o
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  #362  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2019, 4:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
Once I get to Centre-du-Québec/Capitale Nationale, I hear “ai” pronounced like “I” in English, which I’ve never heard before.
I'm curious, what do you mean exactly?

(Also, I'd be very surprised if whatever feature that is wasn't present in Greater Montreal to the exact same degree as the rest of francophone southern Quebec - there are virtually no accent variations anymore in the younger generations.)
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  #363  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2019, 4:17 AM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
I'm curious, what do you mean exactly?

(Also, I'd be very surprised if whatever feature that is wasn't present in Greater Montreal to the exact same degree as the rest of francophone southern Quebec - there are virtually no accent variations anymore in the younger generations.)
(1) Oh right I forgot you’re from Lévis. Have you ever heard “cinq” or “lac saint jean” pronounced as an English I* with a nasal sound? Or tête where ê sounds like an English I*?

*As in, “I am old.”

If that’s still confusing, think the German sound “Ei” as in “Einstein” and in “Reich”.

(2) That’s what I noticed too. In fact most don’t even pronounce -an (i.e. trois an) or -en (i.e. stationnement) the québécois way anymore, despite having the québécois intonation. I’m actually pretty sad.
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  #364  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2019, 4:21 AM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
I'm curious, what do you mean exactly?

(Also, I'd be very surprised if whatever feature that is wasn't present in Greater Montreal to the exact same degree as the rest of francophone southern Quebec - there are virtually no accent variations anymore in the younger generations.)
My kids pass for locals in places like Quebec City and Rivière-du-Loup and no one asks them where they are from based on their accent. And they have never lived anywhere but Gatineau.

You'd have to have a fairly long conversation with them and have it go in the direction of specific terms in order to pick out any Outaouais particularities in their speech. (Which do exist, but they're not generally apparent in casual chatter.)
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  #365  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2019, 4:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
(2) That’s what I noticed too. In fact most don’t even pronounce -an (i.e. trois an) or -en (i.e. stationnement) the québécois way anymore, despite having the québécois intonation. I’m actually pretty sad.
Yes, the -an/-en sound is a good example of a generational change in Quebec French. Away from the old French Canadian way which was almost twangy, to a sound that is virtually identical to the way francophone Europeans say it.

It's very noticeable with my kids and their friends (vs my generation).
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  #366  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2019, 4:30 AM
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Yes, the -an/-en sound is a good example of a generational change in Quebec French. Away from the old French Canadian way which was almost twangy, to a sound that is virtually identical to the way francophone Europeans say it.

It's very noticeable with my kids and their friends (vs my generation).
At this rate, if I try to speak French in Québec, people are gonna think I’m 50 years old or something (despite only being in mid-20’s).

Even in Ontario, people are moving away from that pronunciation too.
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  #367  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2019, 4:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
At this rate, if I try to speak French in Québec, people are gonna think I’m 50 years old or something (despite only being in mid-20’s).

Even in Ontario, people are moving away from that pronunciation too.
Perhaps. I can't say I have noticed even though a good chunk of my extended family are Franco-Ontarians.

Generally speaking a lot of the old French Canadian colloquialism seems to subsist longer in Ontario and the Prairies than it does in Quebec. Québécois often say that these francophones talk "old-fashioned".

I think one of the reasons is probably that they're not as exposed to international francophone media (movies, TV, music) as Québécois are. (Since the former tend to consume culture and media mostly in English.) Contrary to the Québécois, they're also somewhat less likely to have francophones from other parts of the world in their midst.
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  #368  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2019, 4:57 AM
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It’ll be funny if places like Prescott-Russell/Cornwall/North Bay/Sudbury/Timmins become some sort of centre for the old québécois French down the road, if you know what I mean.

I’m imagining now:
Question: “Pourquoi parles-tu comme un ancien québécois, comme mon père (si non grand-père)?
Réponse: “Je suis Nord-Ontarien. C’est pourquoi.

Seriously though, next time someone (including my friends) asks me why “my French” sounds weird, I’m gonna say I’m from Northern Ontario. @GlassCity don’t call me out.
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A: Hook up a trailer to the back of the pickup truck and get from one Bay to the other Bay. Then you can understand which is more of a better highway to upgrade.
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  #369  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2019, 5:48 AM
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When an anglophone is trying to speak French :

















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PROVINCE OF QUEBEC ==> 8 400 000
MONTREAL ==> 4 200 000
QUEBEC CITY ==> 820 000
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  #370  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 3:07 PM
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Lol.

I just found this:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xmUVZtjduCI

Acajack is this what you meant by English-tinged?

Ça a l’air très très très différent du vieux accent québécois. (Je suis désolé aux usagers Franco-ontariens ici, mais) ça sonne vraiment anglicisé.
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A: Hook up a trailer to the back of the pickup truck and get from one Bay to the other Bay. Then you can understand which is more of a better highway to upgrade.
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  #371  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 3:09 PM
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Then there’s also this:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2Uj_p2kNzI8

It sounds much less English-tinged.

Pay attention to 1:06. (Sorry vid)

(Quand nous parlions de la baie du tonnerre, nous avons tous ri.)
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  #372  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 3:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
Lol.

I just found this:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xmUVZtjduCI

Acajack is this what you meant by English-tinged?

Ça a l’air très très très différent du vieux accent québécois. (Je suis désolé aux usagers Franco-ontariens ici, mais) ça sonne vraiment anglicisé.
Is there any reason why FrancoOntarian accent(s) shouldn't sound different from those of Quebec? Seems pretty normal to me, since they've been gone from Quebec for three or four generations or more and Quebec accents have also changed during that time.
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  #373  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 3:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
Lol.

I just found this:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xmUVZtjduCI

Acajack is this what you meant by English-tinged?

Ça a l’air très très très différent du vieux accent québécois. (Je suis désolé aux usagers Franco-ontariens ici, mais) ça sonne vraiment anglicisé.
I've always found Amanda Simard's French to be very slightly English-tinged, especially for someone from Prescott-Russell where the Franco-Ontarian accent is closest to that of Quebec.

That said, she does have a few old French Canadian pronunciations, that people of her social standing in Quebec wouldn't use.

I quickly picked up on the way she says "Sénat". She says "say-nuhhh", whereas contemporary Quebecers (especially if they are lawyers or politicians like her, would say "say-nah".

Same goes with "Canada". The way she says the "da" at the end is not really the way people of her social class would say it in Quebec these days. The way she places accents on the syllables is also slightly different.

I also noticed that the interviewer, Nadia Campbell, speaks with an accent that's closer to the Quebec accent. According to her Facebook, she is from the Ottawa suburb of Orleans. In theory as someone from there she'd have a more English-tinged accent than Amanda Simard who is from a much more predominantly francophone town (Embrun).

But Franco-Ontarians who work in the media tend to work in French all day (contrary to their Franco-Ontarian peers who do other jobs) and are more influenced by Québécois (who are often their colleagues in the media) and as such are pretty unique in that their accent is fairly indistinguishable from the Québécois one - most of the time anyway.
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  #374  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 3:43 PM
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Is there any reason why FrancoOntarian accent(s) shouldn't sound different from those of Quebec? Seems pretty normal to me, since they've been gone from Quebec for three or four generations or more and Quebec accents have also changed during that time.
I’d think that for those living along the border (including those in Timiskaming/Témiscamingue and in Cochrane), the accents should be... uh... similar?

Further west like Sudbury, Hearst and Longlac the accent’s probably different as you suggested.

@Acajack so that’s why the 2nd video sounds more québécois.
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  #375  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 3:47 PM
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Is there any reason why FrancoOntarian accent(s) shouldn't sound different from those of Quebec? Seems pretty normal to me, since they've been gone from Quebec for three or four generations or more and Quebec accents have also changed during that time.
My guess is that at this point a significant chunk of the Franco-Ontarian population is still not at 3-4+ generations in the province and that far removed from Quebec.

Most of the Franco-Ontarians I know (in the east and northeast) tend to have grandparents born in Quebec. Yes, there are some who are multi-generationally settled in Ontario but that does not appear to be the majority. At least not among people who are actually still francophones.

My wife is Franco-Ontarian from the northeast and all four of her grandparents were born in Quebec and one of her parents was also born in Quebec but arrived in Ontario as a baby. This appears to be quite typical among her francophone friends from her hometown.

The francophone migration from Quebec to Ontario has slowed down quite a bit, and I guess this will lead to a greater share of francophones (those with Canadian origins at least) having deeper roots in Ontario.

Of course, you're right on your broader point that is no "correct" accent to speak French with.
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  #376  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 3:55 PM
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My guess is that at this point a significant chunk of the Franco-Ontarian population is still not at 3-4+ generations in the province and that far removed from Quebec.

Most of the Franco-Ontarians I know (in the east and northeast) tend to have grandparents born in Quebec. Yes, there are some who are multi-generationally settled in Ontario but that does not appear to be the majority. At least not among people who are actually still francophones.

My wife is Franco-Ontarian from the northeast and all four of her grandparents were born in Quebec and one of her parents was also born in Quebec but arrived in Ontario as a baby. This appears to be quite typical among her francophone friends from her hometown.

The francophone migration from Quebec to Ontario has slowed down quite a bit, and I guess this will lead to a greater share of francophones (those with Canadian origins at least) having deeper roots in Ontario.

Of course, you're right on your broader point that is no "correct" accent to speak French with.
Although, in a Canadian context, there is the "Radio Canada newscaster" accent .... I always think of it as French Canada's version of Received Pronunciation.
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  #377  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 3:58 PM
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Then there’s also this:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2Uj_p2kNzI8

It sounds much less English-tinged.

Pay attention to 1:06. (Sorry vid)

(Quand nous parlions de la baie du tonnerre, nous avons tous ri.)
These guys do have a point. There is no single Franco-Ontarian accent that outsiders will recognize as there is too much regional variation in the interplay between the Quebec and Anglo influences - which if we're honest are the two main drivers of how Franco-Ontarians speak.

Funnily enough, last night around the dinner table with a bunch of teens (my kids and some of their friends), for comic effect I took on a robotic professorial tone, and the teens reacted by saying... "uhh... why are you speaking with a Franco-Ontarian accent all of a sudden?"

Like many Québécois, when my teens have a Franco-Ontarian accent in mind, this is what they think of (see video). Paidge Beaulieu is actually a caricatural personnage created by Katherine Levac, who is a Franco-Ontarian herself from St-Bernardin, which is in far eastern Ontario, about half an hour from the Quebec border. Levac went to the École nationale de l'humour in Montreal, and is now one of Quebec's up and coming young comics. She does not speak with a Paidge Beaulieu accent in real life.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4X9Gc4F27LA
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  #378  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 10:06 PM
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I had not heard of Katherine Levac before. She seems quite charming. I'll have to watch for her performing in Ottawa.
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  #379  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 10:11 PM
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I had not heard of Katherine Levac before. She seems quite charming. I'll have to watch for her performing in Ottawa.
If she plays Ottawa it'll be at Shenkman in Orleans.

Obviously she'd do shows on the Gatineau side too.
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  #380  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 10:14 PM
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If she plays Ottawa it'll be at Shenkman in Orleans.

Obviously she'd do shows on the Gatineau side too.
I was out to the Shenkman complex this past summer - amazing to see such an extensive cultural facility out in the middle of suburban nothingness.
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