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  #41  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2007, 9:52 AM
Coriander Coriander is offline
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I can't comment on the weather but there will always be people who want to live on the edge of a given city. The fact that it's an island and will have quite a bit of open space will add to the appeal. Plus it seems it will be an attractive development. It will be SF's Roosevelt island.
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  #42  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2007, 6:06 PM
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^^^You movin' there?
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  #43  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2007, 6:48 PM
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I lived on Yerba Buena Island for six months with the Academy of Arts. God there was nothing at all there, but quite honestly it wasnt all that bad. Was a neat feeling being in this tiny forrest between SF and Oakland. For me there is something appealing about island life, especially if a plethora of activity sits a stones throw away by boat. I'd reckon I would be in consideration of purchasing if I could consider purchasing. Where do I sign up.

BTW, If you are driving into san francisco from Oakland you can see my building and the little deck we had. Actually it was more of a roof than a deck.
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  #44  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 7:22 AM
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Originally Posted by BTinSF View Post
^^^You movin' there?
whether you or i or any individual would want to live on TI is sort of irrelevant. they aren't marking to everyone, they're marketing to some particular subset of people looking for a particular thing. i think TI will have no problem selling or renting units for one simple reason - people pay for views. the views of the city are phenomenal.

there are a lot of places i wouldn't chose to live - but they're still successful developments.

most people will drive (just like everywhere, sadly) but the ferries will be viable for the people 'commuting' to the financial district on weekdays. avoiding the toll plazas will make the congestion somewhat more bearable.

as for the casino - i was always a big fan of the idea of turning treasure island into some sort of 21st century adult urban playground. casinos, high end bars, restaurants, retail, etc. it would be awesome. like taking a little slice of macao and transporting it to the middle of the bay
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  #45  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 7:51 AM
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Originally Posted by mthd View Post
as for the casino - i was always a big fan of the idea of turning treasure island into some sort of 21st century adult urban playground. casinos, high end bars, restaurants, retail, etc. it would be awesome. like taking a little slice of macao and transporting it to the middle of the bay
Now you're talkin'. But as for the people wanting to live there for the views, only time will tell, but I predict a lot of 'em will last 6 to 12 months and then decide the views aren't worth the inconvenience and isolation. For 6 years I could look at those views all day 5 days a week, but every one of those days I was never so happy as when I was rolling west onto the 5th and Harrison exit ramp.
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  #46  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 1:43 AM
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Inspired by Marvel 33's post http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...&postcount=803, I checked out SOM's website and found some cool renderings that are worth a glance.

From:http://www.som.com/content.cfm/bending_the_grid



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  #47  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 2:27 AM
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Interesting--->Seems to show both One Rincon towers, 375 Fremont, 301 (or is it 300) Folsom and both 300 Spear towers, but not 45 Lansing.
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  #48  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 4:25 AM
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Actually, I would NOT want to live there. Aside from the isolation and the constant wind, I would be concerned about earthquakes. I worked there at the time of the 1989 quake. There was serious liquifaction with mud "boils" and geysers, the pipes supplying water, gas and power from the "mainland" broke and so on. I know that buildings built now would be built much more solidly than the structures that were there in 1989 (some of which suffered surprising damage), but the land itself is a question mark in a bigger quake like 1906.
1 - About 1/2 of the remainder of the city is built on landfill as well.
2 - I personally think it is safer to live in a newer building in a landfill area (say Mission Bay), where they drive the metal piles down to the bedrock than to live in an older building on the hillside. The ground there may be more stable, but the building certainly isn't.
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  #49  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 5:55 AM
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^^^If you're on TI, just make sure you're on at least the 4th floor (higher is better). And keep an inflatable boat in the closet.
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  #50  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 5:31 PM
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  #51  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 10:39 PM
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Marvel33 originally found this and posted it to the SF Rundown thread. But since TI has its own thread--which he may not have realized--I thought it should go here. The original article also contains (and may have been the source for) the socketsite renderings above but I won't post them again--you can go to the original for them.

Quote:
Reawakening Treasure Island

Monday, June 18, 2007
By kelly Matlock

San Francisco, CA, US (NCS) - How do you go about redeveloping a 393-acre manmade island that was originally constructed for the Golden Gate International Exposition and later served as a United States Naval Air Station until its decommissioning in 1997?

The San Francisco office of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill has fearlessly answered that question with a master plan development proposal for San Francisco’s Treasure Island, located off Yerba Buena Island and connected to the San Francisco Bay Bridge.

Since 2005, SOM has worked to create a new vision for the island after former development proposals were opposed for various reasons after the initial planning began in 2001.

Two associate firms based in San Francisco, SMWM and CMG Landscape Architects, were also working on the project. The development team includes San Francisco’s Kenwood Investments and Wilson Meany Sullivan, along with Lennar Corporation, headquartered in Miami.

According to the architects, the plan has earned broad support from community groups, political leaders and business organizations since its unveiling at a series of meetings and presentations led by SOM.

The Treasure Island Plan involves a unique, 21st century San Francisco community that is socially and economically diverse and supported by close-knit neighborhoods, unprecedented open space, resource-conserving technology and a robust network of transportation choices. Envisioned as both a great place to live and a regional destination, the plan proposes three compact neighborhoods centered around an energizing, mixed-use hub and ferry terminal set within a richly faceted 275-acre Great Park.

The scope, scale and visibility of the project make it one of the largest development plans in San Francisco history and one of the highest profile urban redevelopments in the country.

The environmentally sustainable scheme includes green elements including runoff-filtering wetlands and green skyscrapers as well as an ecological education and art park, a shoreline park at the island’s edge, playgrounds and a 20-acre organic farm. A wind farm as well as diagonal rows of trees will help control the amount of wind hitting the island.

The new development would take up only a quarter of the island’s area and will be built in phases. In the residential phase, there will be approximately 5,900 residential units built, of which 30 percent will be affordable. The residential area will accommodate around 13,500 residents, and will be divided by high-density, low-to-midrise blocks of townhouses, flats clustered around neighborhood open spaces, and residential towers approximately 14 stories high.

A new street grid aligned with rows of wind-shielding trees offers
“a richer pedestrian experience than the typical Cartesian grid,” said SOM partner Craig Hartman.

Four 40-story towers will surround a central, 60-story tower, which will be supported by a structural exoskeleton that frames an optimal amount of glass for the exterior. The tower will incorporate sustainable features, such as the use of geothermal energy, a series of glass light shelves clad in transparent photovoltaic film, and a glass sky garden on the roof. The building will be called the Sun Tower, in reference to the island’s former Tower of the Sun, a 400-foot structure that was the first major landmark of the original exhibition grounds.

All of the towers will be concentrated in the center of the island’s urban core. A new ferry terminal will be installed adjacent to a new retail, commercial and cultural district, and a parking system will encourage car-free living. The neighborhoods, which are pedestrian and bicycle-friendly, will be within a ten minute walk to the ferry terminal.

In December, the $1.2 billion development plan, of which $500 million would be private investment and $700 million would be city bonds, received preliminary approval from the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. This preliminary approval opened doors for the design and development team to make a binding contract. A group of additional architects may be commissioned throughout the design process to flesh out the plan.

“The intent is to make this a new national model for what a wholly sustainable community can be about,” said Hartman.

Overall completion of the development is currently scheduled for 2022, and new residents are expected to move in by 2013.
Source: http://www.newcityskyline.com/Treasu...asterPlan.html
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  #52  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2008, 2:13 AM
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I just spent new years around treasure island and the city, and I really like the feel of how treasure island is now. The residents don't pay utilities except for rent, and rent also seems pretty cheap. I thought this proposal was cool, but after hanging out there I'm not so sure about it.
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  #53  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2008, 7:27 PM
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Originally Posted by TWAK View Post
I just spent new years around treasure island and the city, and I really like the feel of how treasure island is now. The residents don't pay utilities except for rent, and rent also seems pretty cheap. I thought this proposal was cool, but after hanging out there I'm not so sure about it.
Yeah, it is cheap compared to the rest of the city. However, the problem with the current state is that there is NOTHING there other than the apartments. People have to take a bus into the city for any and all convenience items. Also, many of the buildings are old, run down and pose a fire danger. Some of the vacant units are currently used by many homeless squatters and I believe that two major fires occured because of this in 2007 on the island.
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  #54  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2008, 4:46 PM
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From:http://www.popularmechanics.com/scie...h/4239381.html
Via:http://www.socketsite.com/

Quote:
Treasure Island Is the Super-Green City of the Future
A blighted island in San Francisco Bay could become the world’s hottest property, a showcase of sustainable design. With cities now consuming 75 percent of natural resources, it’s just in time.


By Logan Ward
Photographs by Ofer Wolberger
Published in the January 2008 issue.
Every day, a few hundred thousand vehicles cross the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, their drivers barely aware of the small, rectangular land mass lying just to the north. From where I am standing, on rocky Yerba Buena Island, I can both hear the traffic thundering overhead and look across a narrow isthmus to the long-forgotten patch of real estate in the middle of the bay: Treasure Island. Home to an abandoned Navy base and a small population of low- to middle-income residents, the 400-acre property hardly lives up to its prosperous name. Defunct military buildings, rusty oil tanks and electrical transformers litter the landscape. Crumbling asphalt caps chemical dumps.

Treasure Island is an unlikely place to look for the city of the future, but that's what I'm here to find. My guide is Jean Rogers, an environmental engineer with the global design and consulting firm Arup. Surrounded by a panorama of postcard views—San Francisco, Golden Gate, Berkeley Hills—and buffeted by winds that whip in from the Pacific, Rogers seems somewhat unlikely, too: Petite, stylish, with an impressive string of degrees and a down-to-business manner, she speaks with easygoing "likes" and "you knows" sprinkled among phrases such as "tertiary water treatment" and "optimal solar exposure." Rogers jabs at the ground with the heel of her shoe, reminding me what an engineering feat we stand on: Completely man-made, Treasure Island consists of 20 million cubic yards of sea bottom that has been dredged up, dumped into walls made of 287,000 tons of quarried rock and topped with 50,000 cubic yards of loam.

Built for the Golden Gate International Exposition in 1939, Treasure Island was claimed as a Naval base during World War II. When the base was finally decommissioned 11 years ago, San Francisco began studying how to redevelop it. From nearly 300 meetings among city officials, engineers, architects and the public emerged a plan for the most ambitious new community in the United States—a 13,500-person "urban oasis" that will rise from the soil of reclaimed Superfund sites, combining cutting-edge technology with restored natural systems to leave a light footprint on the Earth. After ground is broken in 2009, Treas ure Island will become a testbed for the newest ideas in energy efficiency, water conservation, waste management and low-impact living. Says Rogers, with idealism undaunted by the task ahead: "We want it to be the most ecological city in the world."

At no time in history has a model metropolis been more sorely needed. More than half of the people on Earth now live in cities, where they consume 75 percent of the natural resources and are responsible for the majority of greenhouse gases. But while cities can be a liability to the planet—their aging infrastructure ripping through raw materials and compounding the effects of global warming—they can also represent an important opportunity. Typically, food and water enter a city as raw material and exit it as sewage and garbage in what might be called a linear flow. By producing its own energy and recycling its waste, a city can operate less like a factory and more like an ecosystem—supporting a larger number of people with far fewer resources.

Treasure Island represents a rare chance to wipe the slate clean—to tear down old infrastructure and lay new foundations using only the smartest ideas for the future. As Jared Blumenfeld, the director of San Francisco's Department of the Environment, asked a crowded forum last spring: "If you could start from scratch, absolute scratch, what would you build?"

(Click link to read rest of article and use the interactive maps)
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  #55  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2008, 5:41 AM
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Quote:
Island housing

Calling for more housing affordability in the Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Redevelopment Plan

By Michael Leonard

As the Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Redevelopment Plan heads for a pair of public hearings that will shape the project's environmental impact report, Sup. Chris Daly, whose District 6 includes the island, is calling for more housing affordability.

The Mayor's Office of Base Reuse and Real Estate Development is pushing the project along with private partner Treasure Island Community Development (which includes politically connected entities such as Lennar Corp. and Darius Anderson's Kenwood Investments).

The project now calls for 5,500 to 6,000 housing units, 30 percent of them to be offered below market rates, including 400 available to "formerly homeless San Franciscans."

But Daly introduced a resolution Jan. 15 calling for half the units to be offered below market rates. "What [the resolution] comes out of is a growing sense that we need to do more for affordable housing, especially when there are significant public resources involved," Daly told the Guardian in a phone interview.

Jack Sylvan, project manager for the city, noted that the Board of Supervisors approved the project's term sheet 10-1 in 2006, with Daly among those in favor. "It's changing the rules in the middle of the game," Sylan told us. Plus, he doubts the developer could meet that affordability goal and still have the project pencil out: "It's not a choice between 30 percent and 50 percent. It's a choice between 30 percent and zero."

Daly's resolution heads to the board's Land Use and Economic Development Committee in the next few weeks. The first Planning Department meeting is on Feb. 11, 6 p.m., at the Bayside Conference Room, Port of San Francisco, Pier 1. The second is on Feb. 13, 6 p.m., at the Ship Shape Bldg., bldg. 497, Avenue M and 11th Ave., Treasure Island. These will focus solely on the drafting of the EIR, but the affordable-housing aspect will continue to be part of the larger discussion.
Source: http://www.sfbg.com/printable_entry.php?entry_id=5614
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  #56  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2008, 6:21 AM
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Treasure Island represents a rare chance to wipe the slate clean—to tear down old infrastructure and lay new foundations using only the smartest ideas for the future. As Jared Blumenfeld, the director of San Francisco's Department of the Environment, asked a crowded forum last spring: "If you could start from scratch, absolute scratch, what would you build?"

Brasilia, apparently...
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  #57  
Old Posted Apr 14, 2008, 8:32 PM
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A small, but I think interesting, update from the Examiner:

Quote:
Historical building may anchor ferry terminal
by John Upton
April 12, 2008




SAN FRANCISCO (Map, News) - A cavernous crescent-shaped building on Treasure Island, designed more than 70 years ago to serve as an airport terminal, will soon be the backdrop for another type of landing.

In late 2006, the Board of Supervisors adopted a multibillion-dollar Treasure Island development plan that included a ferry terminal and transit hub, hotels, 300 acres of parks and 6,000 new housing units, including a residential tower that could reach 60 stories.

In updated plans, the ferry terminal has been moved to the front of the U-shaped Building 1 — a four-story building at the entry to the island which has wide staircases, a marble-clad hallway, high ceilings topped by a dome and 150,000 square feet of space.

Ferries that arrive at the terminal would carry tourists and locals alike, according to Jack Sylvan, who oversees public-private partnership projects for The City.

“Ideally, it will attract everybody in the way that the Ferry Building does,” he said.

The U-shaped building was built for the two-year international exposition that began in 1939 and designed to be used eventually as an international airport terminal. It never served that purpose because the Navy took over the island in the lead-up to World War II, according to a 1995 historical study. More recently, it was featured in the movie “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.”

Under “current thinking,” the building would be filled with shops and restaurants, according to Sylvan.

Treasure Island Development Authority directors in a recent public meeting told Sylvan it will be important to plan stores that are affordable to low-income island residents. Nearly one-third of the new units planned on the island will be sold at below-market rate, plans show.

The updated plans will be presented to the Board of Supervisors when an environmental impact report for the project is finished, according to Sylvan. That’s expected early next year, he said.

The artificially made, 450-acre island is currently home to nearly 3,000 people — “everything from no-income to high-income” residents, according to development authority spokeswoman Marianne Thompson.
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  #58  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2008, 5:52 PM
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From: http://www.socketsite.com/

Quote:

Supervisor Daly Drops Treasure Island Below Market Rate Bill

In other real estate related Supervisor news:

Supervisor Chris Daly tabled legislation Tuesday that he had proposed to increase to 50 percent the amount of below-market-rate housing offered in the planned major redevelopment of Treasure Island.
His decision to drop the item comes a week after another housing measure he backed at the polls suffered a decisive defeat. That measure, Proposition F, would have required the redevelopment of Bayview-Hunters Point to offer 50 percent of the housing at below the market rate, not the 30 percent as proposed.
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  #59  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2008, 5:58 PM
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Quote:
Barack Obama May Be Treasure Island's Only Hope



Not even a week into President-elect Barack Obama's, uh, president-electness, and his halo's already glowing over Treasure Island. While developer Wilson Meany Sullivan twiddles its thumbs waiting to build San Francisco's island eco-wonderland, the city's been hard at work negotiating with the federal government for a price to let the former Navy base go quietly. At the city's offer of about $40 million, plus 50 percent of future land profits, the feds aren't budging— thus dooming us to a neverending limbo of dragon boat races and the occasional concert. Enter the messiah president-elect, who will likely pounce on the opportunity to get the feds a few extra benjamins while putting the land into productive use to stimulate the economy. Said the city's economic development director: "It hasn’t been necessarily clear that the current administration’s priorities around closed military bases have been local economic development." Not necessarily, but... Yes! We! Can!
Source: http://sf.curbed.com/
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  #60  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2008, 11:06 PM
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^ Here's the article from the Examiner that goes along with that:

Quote:
City hoping for easier Treasure Island buy
By Katie Worth
Examiner Staff Writer 11/10/08


SAN FRANCISCO – The City may get a better deal on Treasure Island under President-elect Barack Obama’s administration, the project’s leaders say.

For the last two years, The City has been embroiled in negotiations with the Navy on the purchase price of Treasure Island, a former military base that ceased operations in 1997. The City hopes to build 6,000 new homes, three hotels, a 400-slip marina, and a bevy of retail, restaurants and entertainment venues on the island, along with 300 acres of parks and open space. But the Navy and city negotiators have not been able to come to an agreement.

In summer, city negotiators offered to buy the island from the federal government for the price of cleaning it up — the equivalent of $40 million, upfront — plus 50 percent of future profits from the land. However, the Navy has not accepted that deal.

Developer Tom Sullivan of San Francisco firm Wilson Meany Sullivan said he’s hopeful the new administration may bring a change in some of the negotiators, and may bring the deal to a close sooner — and with better terms for The City.

San Francisco Economic Development Director Michael Cohen said he’s not sure the negotiating team will change, but perhaps their objectives may.

“I think there’s a reason to be optimistic that the Obama administration will understand, from an economic stimulus standpoint, how important it is to take these dormant military bases — of which there’s 35,000 acres in California — and put them back into economic productive use,” he said. “It hasn’t been necessarily clear that the current administration’s priorities around closed military bases have been local economic development.”

The City is finalizing the development plan for the island, and will be ready to move forward in about 12 months, Cohen said.

“We need to have a Navy deal done before then,” he said.
Perhaps a bit of wishful thinking on the city's part, but hopefully they're right. It would be nice to have this in position to start once the economics of development turn around.
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