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View Poll Results: Would you like to separate this thread for individual station projects?
Yes 19 31.15%
No 42 68.85%
Voters: 61. You may not vote on this poll

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  #2981  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 3:17 AM
officedweller officedweller is offline
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Cool, thanks!
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  #2982  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 5:24 AM
aberdeen5698 aberdeen5698 is offline
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Originally Posted by Waders View Post
I think staircase is still useful in some situation(e.g. power outage which happened to the area a few times already this year).
The escalators can be used just fine by most people during a power outage. The most pressing need for a staircase is to provide access when an escalator is out of service for maintenance.

And it's also nice to have an alternate access route that normally isn't too crowded
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  #2983  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 5:42 PM
Sheba Sheba is offline
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Originally Posted by aberdeen5698 View Post
The escalators can be used just fine by most people during a power outage. The most pressing need for a staircase is to provide access when an escalator is out of service for maintenance.

And it's also nice to have an alternate access route that normally isn't too crowded
Would a power outage in the area necessarily cause a power outage in the station? I remember being at New West Station during a power outage and the station itself was fine (the stores within the station were without power). I'd think the stations would be considered important enough to be on their own grid (apologies if I didn't get the terminology right).
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  #2984  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 7:21 PM
cganuelas1995 cganuelas1995 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aberdeen5698 View Post
The escalators can be used just fine by most people during a power outage. The most pressing need for a staircase is to provide access when an escalator is out of service for maintenance.

And it's also nice to have an alternate access route that normally isn't too crowded
I dunno, I've seen people stand on the escalator when it's clearly in "stairs" mode.
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  #2985  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 7:24 PM
Millennium2002 Millennium2002 is offline
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If I recall correctly from the reporting around the 2008 incident where a transformer blew near Tinseltown, SkyTrain stations and track can be fed power from alternate substations if the primary suffers a blackout. The only weak point is Downtown, where there is only one substation for the four SkyTrain stations due to space constraints.
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  #2986  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 1:58 AM
Meraki Meraki is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheba View Post
Would a power outage in the area necessarily cause a power outage in the station? I remember being at New West Station during a power outage and the station itself was fine (the stores within the station were without power). I'd think the stations would be considered important enough to be on their own grid (apologies if I didn't get the terminology right).
The actual trains are on their own grid, but not sure about stations themselves. When New West has had a few power outages when I was living there, trains were running but lights, platform displays, pretty much everything except Compass readers and ticket machines were without power like the surrounding area.
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  #2987  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 2:08 AM
Waders Waders is offline
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The Globe and Mail has a good article about "stopped" escalator.

That stopped escalator? It's a tougher climb


Quote:
THE QUESTION

"When an escalator is not functioning but people can still walk on it, everyone seems to avoid it and take the adjacent stairs," writes Eric Morris of Montreal. He wonders why. An escalator that has stopped and a set of stairs are basically the same thing, he says.

THE ANSWER

Not quite, says Derek Wilson, a retired engineer of Port Moody, B.C. "A typical stairway will have a tread depth of about 11 inches [28 centimetres] and a riser height of about seven inches [18 cm]" he writes. These dimensions make for a "comfortable" stairway to ascend, he says. The stairway's angle of inclination from the horizontal is about 32 to 35 degrees.

Now, as George Fowler of Halifax points out, an escalator, in contrast, "is designed as a series of platforms upon which people can stand and feel comfortable," so the tread is long relative to the rise. Yes indeed, Mr. Wilson says, that's why an escalator has a tread depth of about 16 inches (40 cm).

For an escalator to parallel an adjacent stairway, which often has intermediate landings, Mr. Wilson explains that the escalator must have an angle of about 27 degrees or more. "The geometry, then, requires that the escalator have a greater riser height of eight inches [20 cm]or more."

So, the greater riser height and tread depth of a stalled escalator make walking up it more difficult.

Mark Cole of London, Ont., adds that it's also partly in our minds. We're used to escalators that move, he says, and "have learned to adjust our pace as we plant our leading foot on what is, in essence, a belt moving away from us."

Mr. Cole says it is difficult to suppress this learned response when we step onto a stationary escalator, giving us an uneasy feeling.

For the final thought on this, though, back to Mr. Fowler, whose wife never uses a stopped escalator because, she says: "You never know when the darned thing is going to start up."
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  #2988  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 2:25 AM
dpogue dpogue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meraki View Post
The actual trains are on their own grid, but not sure about stations themselves. When New West has had a few power outages when I was living there, trains were running but lights, platform displays, pretty much everything except Compass readers and ticket machines were without power like the surrounding area.
That's my understanding. The train propulsion power substations are pretty reliable, and it's a continuous feed so that a single substation losing power theoretically wouldn't necessarily cause problems (in practice, there are some constraints).

The stations themselves have a backup battery system for emergency lighting and critical equipment, and power technicians will be dispatched to bring and connect a generator as soon as the control centre hears that power is out. A power outage (or surge) will cause all escalators to stop, and all elevators to go into fire mode (doors open at ground level). It used to take out the old ticket vending machines, but I'm not sure what happens with the Compass machines and gates.
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  #2989  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 4:15 AM
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MIPS MIPS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meraki View Post
The actual trains are on their own grid, but not sure about stations themselves. When New West has had a few power outages when I was living there, trains were running but lights, platform displays, pretty much everything except Compass readers and ticket machines were without power like the surrounding area.
A few years ago BC Hydro was doing work around Nanaimo station and had to switch the power off. Train service still ran through the station fine but there was a diesel generator hooked into the backup connection at the front of the building to provide minimal lighting and TVM functionality.
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  #2990  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 9:54 PM
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VancouverOfTheFuture VancouverOfTheFuture is online now
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i noticed the other day that the formerly green, now white tubular frames are starting to get some dark/dirt looking accumulation at the bottoms where they curve to connect to the guide-way. i noticed it at Commercial-Broadway Station.
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  #2991  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 12:23 AM
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That just means the honeymoon is over.

Now you get to see first hand WHY in the lower mainland you don't use white unless you are promising to commit time to the maintenance and cleaning of an object for the remainder of its life.
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  #2992  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2017, 6:58 AM
officedweller officedweller is offline
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Metrotown Station
by Yellow Fever @SSC

October 4th:

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October 31st:

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IMG_7425 by Hung Lam, on Flickr

IMG_7430 by Hung Lam, on Flickr

IMG_7431 by Hung Lam, on Flickr

IMG_7435 by Hung Lam, on Flickr
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