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  #21  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 6:05 PM
Docere Docere is online now
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The "Grenville" part of Leeds and Grenville is very connected to Ottawa. 58% in North Grenville, 36% in Merrickville-Wolford and 26% in Edwardsburgh/Cardinal work in Ottawa.
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  #22  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 6:24 PM
megadude megadude is offline
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Originally Posted by manny_santos View Post
There has been a trend in very recent years towards greater centralization of offices in the GTA. Another of the Big 4 accounting firms, Deloitte, centralized all seven of its GTA offices into one new Downtown Toronto office two years ago. This is the opposite of a trend I remember 10 years ago, that was even discussed on SSP, about large companies opening more and more suburban offices, allowing people living in areas like Mississauga to work in Mississauga; part of that trend even included people living in Toronto commuting to the suburbs, which was helping even out traffic flows. That still exists of course, but I foresee it will be reduced as more companies develop Downtown Toronto tunnel-vision and assume all Millennials want to live and work there.

What's lost in these types of moves is that it takes away offices from where people live. Not everyone lives, or wants to live in, or can afford to live in Downtown Toronto, and not everyone wants to spend 2-3 hours a day commuting from Hamilton, Oshawa, or even suburban parts of the City of Toronto. I know another company that undertook a consolidation similar to Deloitte's happened and a significant number of employees quit because they refused to commute to Downtown Toronto from the suburban area of the GTA where they lived and worked. It also puts massive strain on infrastructure such as the TTC and GO Transit that has been unable to keep up with increased demand.

Yup. 10-15 years ago TD and RBC moved their mortgage admin operations to Sauga in new buildings. I worked at TD in that new building off Eglinton. The mortgage office was previously near Bay and College. And in those 10-15 years anyone could have noticed the corporate signage popping up on suburban office buildings.

Now Toronto and especially DT TO vacancy rates are historically low. Vancouver as well.

That Burlington office wasn't the only consolidation. There was an office off Vic Park that merged into the new one.

So far I know of one person that has already quit because of the move out of Burlington. She wasn't about to fight traffic on QEW, 427, 401. Especially since she already lived in Burlington like 7 minutes away. But for the rest, so many of their positions are highly specialized. And they promoted some with fancier titles and slightly more pay.

Hopefully new "downtowns" like Vaughan and Markham will attract corporations back into the burbs. Though Hwy 7 is already effed as it is now! But if I lived one stop closer on the GO line, I would be standing on the train to Downtown TO because of all the people. And trains on the LSW line run like every 10-15 minutes!


And at this point, true bedroom communities like Milton are almost a bad thing. Milton does have some industrial, but pretty much zero office. Maybe a handful of tiny offices on Main St., but I'd like to see a few low rise offices go up there so the people of fast growing Milton don't have to drive far for work. And then some people in NW Sauga can commute the other way during rush hour.


When I was at TD at Dixie and Eglinton in Sauga a decade ago, Mattamy built up all those new houses in Milton and many of my coworkers bought there for their first house purchases. And of the five or so people I directly know in Milton now that I don't work with, four of them work in Sauga and one in Brampton.

Now that I think about this even more, a guy I work with, who is from Sault Ste Marie, got a job in Guelph after school. He bought a house in Milton so he could go to Guelph and his wife could commute to Sauga. And a girl I worked with at my present company, lives in Milton and was commuting to Matheson and Dixie in Sauga. Then got the job here. Then left for a job in Guelph. And her husband worked in Scarboro but also works in Guelph now.

I literally only know one person who works in Milton, my bro in law, and he lives in Burlington. It's an industrial job. I would like to see more industrial and office jobs there! Especially since it's right on the 401.

Last edited by megadude; Jan 30, 2018 at 7:35 PM.
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  #23  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 7:04 PM
Docere Docere is online now
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Commute to Toronto

Pickering 52.3%
Ajax 47.9%
Markham 46.4%
Vaughan 40.5%
Richmond Hill 38.8%
Whitchurch-Stouffville 31.8%
Whitby 31.7%
King 27.2%
Aurora 27.1%
Mississauga 26.1%
Oakville 24.4%
Brampton 20%
Oshawa 18.1%
Uxbridge 17.7%
Bradford-West Gwillimbury 17.4%
East Gwillimbury 17.1%
Milton 15.7%
Clarington 14.9%
Georgina 14.7%
Innisfil 13.4%
Mono 11.7%
Burlington 11.5%
New Tecumseth 11.5%
Halton Hills 10.9%
Scugog 10.2%

Last edited by Docere; Feb 2, 2018 at 5:17 AM.
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  #24  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 7:11 PM
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Scugog is not the prettiest name name for a municipality!
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  #25  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 7:26 PM
megadude megadude is offline
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Originally Posted by north 42 View Post
Scugog is not the prettiest name name for a municipality!
Correct. And the lake it's named after isn't pretty either. Fished it once. It's murky water. But it does have musky. And it's fairly shallow.

However, most of the many lakes just beyond it in the Kawartha Lakes region are very pretty and practically gin clear.

Though I should point out, the community of Port Perry in Scugog and on Lake Scugog is a charming little area.
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  #26  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 11:30 PM
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Kawartha Lakes would actually meet US MSA criteria for Toronto for outlying county status, with 28.5% commuting to the GTA. Most of them commute to Durham Region (19%), just 4% to Toronto.

55% work in Kawartha Lakes, and another 9% in Peterborough.
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  #27  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2018, 12:22 AM
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Originally Posted by megadude View Post
Correct. And the lake it's named after isn't pretty either. Fished it once. It's murky water. But it does have musky. And it's fairly shallow.

However, most of the many lakes just beyond it in the Kawartha Lakes region are very pretty and practically gin clear.

Though I should point out, the community of Port Perry in Scugog and on Lake Scugog is a charming little area.
Port Perry is very charming. I'm thinking of moving there one day.

However, you're right: Southern Central Ontario has a belt of shitty, weedy shallow lakes ringed with vinyl-sided bungalows of which Scugog is one. Pigeon Lake, Rice Lake and Cook's Bay are some others.
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  #28  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2018, 1:08 AM
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If Scugog hadn't made the 10% threshold for my list, we wouldn't be discussing it. I agree Port Perry is very charming.
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  #29  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2018, 1:10 AM
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Looking at the Toronto one thing that jumps out is that the western suburbs are much bigger job centers. Also Oshawa looks more like the "white Brampton" rather than a little sister to Hamilton.
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  #30  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 5:05 AM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
It looks like St. Andrews (RM) can be added to the Winnipeg CMA, with 53% of its workforce now commuting to Winnipeg which is another 12,000 residents. Niverville, with almost 5,000 residents is now at 56%.
Other municipalities in the MB Capital Region that are not part of the CMA are at the following,
Selkirk, CY (24%)
Stonewall, T (50%)
Teulon, T (43%)
Rockwood, RM (50%)
Cartier, RM (50%)
So maybe by 2021 the entire capital region will coincide with the CMA boundaries.
Yeah, a lot of places that really merit inclusion in the Winnipeg CMA.

Here's the percentage of surrounding Census Divisions commuting to Winnipeg:

Div. No. 10 69.8%
Div. No. 12 58.4%
Div. No. 13 59.1%
Div. No. 14 51.8%
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  #31  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 5:18 AM
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Added Mono Township to list of municipalities with at least 10% of workforce commuting to Toronto.
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  #32  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 5:46 AM
balletomane balletomane is offline
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
Yeah, a lot of places that really merit inclusion in the Winnipeg CMA.

Here's the percentage of surrounding Census Divisions commuting to Winnipeg:

Div. No. 10 69.8%
Div. No. 12 58.4%
Div. No. 13 59.1%
Div. No. 14 51.8%
Thanks for the other numbers,
So how does statistics canada determine when a municipality should be included into a CMA? From what I understand they have "rules", which are prioritized from most to least important.
Rule 1 is when a census subdivision surrounded by another census subdivision (that is part of the CMA) gets included so there isn't a "hole" in the CMA boundaries. Selkirk, Stonewall and Teulon would fall into this category.
Rule 2 is when 50% or more of the workforce commutes to the core municipality according to place of work status. All Capital Region rural municipalities fall into this category.
So by that math shouldn't Winnipeg's CMA actually have ~825,000 according to the 2016 census.
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  #33  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 6:15 AM
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Another set of table give the mode of transportation and commuting time between CMA/CA.


http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-re...NAMEE=&VNAMEF=

Since people can declared their residence different then they were temporary residing on census day. This can produce some interesting results:

Set
Geography: to Vancouver
Geography Type: Place of Work
Commuting Distance: Less then 15 minutes
Sex: Total

eg.
There were 90 respondents who travel between Toronto and Vancouver under 15 minutes.
(10 by public transit and 40 by active transport) Are there any portals that be should know about.

As a footnote, Stats Canada does state.

"The census assumes that the commute to work originates from the usual place of residence, but this may not always be the case. Sometimes, respondents may be on a business trip and may have reported their place of work or main mode of commuting based on where they were working during the trip. Some persons maintain a residence close to work and commute to their home on weekends. Students often work after school at a location near their school. As a result, the data may show unusual commutes or unusual main modes of commuting."
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  #34  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2018, 6:25 AM
balletomane balletomane is offline
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Looking at the commuting percentages a bit more, it looks like the RM of Portage la Prairie should be included into the Portage la Prairie CA. 61% of its workforce commutes into the city, and it was similar in the 2011 census, so why has it not been included in the CA?
Looking at these numbers for Manitoba metro areas makes me wonder if there are other other cases in other provinces (CMAs and CAs that seem like they should be larger due to commuting numbers).
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  #35  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2018, 10:25 PM
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In Québec, there are also a number of communities that reach the first criterium of inclusion into the CMA (50% commuting) without being included, many of them since more than 1 census. They account for ~38k people.

More than 50% commuting (2016) :
South Shore, population 19023
  • Saint-Apollinaire _ 62,8
  • Saint-Agapit _ 52,2
  • Saint-Gilles _ 55,9
  • Saint-Charles-de-Bellechasse _ 55,5
  • La Durantaye _ 55,1
  • Saint-Michel-de-Bellechasse _ 50,4
  • Saint-Vallier _ 61,3

North Shore, population 19053
  • Pont-Rouge _ 51,2
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré and Beaupré _ 52,1
  • Saint-Férréol-les-Neiges _ 60,4



A small number of municipalities also have a commuting flow of between 40 and 50% :

South Shore
  • Dosquet _ 40,8
  • Issoudun _ 41,2

North Shore
  • Donnacona and Cap-Santé _ 45,3
  • Saint-Joachim _ 44,6
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  #36  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2018, 1:00 AM
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As for Montreal...

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  #37  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2018, 1:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laceoflight View Post
As for Montreal...

Saint-Calixte : 6,500
St-R-D-L : 5,500
St-A-S-R : 1,700
Calixa-Lavallée : 500
St-M-S-R : 2,200
Marieville : 11,000
St-J-L-M : 1,750
Rigaud : 7,700
Saint-Clet : 1,700
Ste-J-D-N : 1,000
Très-St-Rédempteur : 1,000

about 40.5K , rural sprawl . lol where is Saint-Hyacinthe lol
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Last edited by GreaterMontréal; Feb 6, 2018 at 1:36 AM.
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  #38  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2018, 1:37 AM
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Another interesting example would be Joliette. The size of the town tends to be underestimated (for example by not including NDL or St-Ambroise in the counts, both of which contribute to the continuous urban area).

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  #39  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2018, 1:39 AM
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Joliette n'est pas plutôt une AR ? je serais bien curieux de voir la pattern de navettage pour Drummondville et Victoriaville.
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  #40  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2018, 1:41 AM
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Originally Posted by GreaterMontréal View Post
about 40.5K , rural sprawl . lol where is Saint-Hyacinthe lol
Only 9,3% of St-Hyacinthe workforce commutes to the Montreal population centre. The situation is about the same in Sorel-Tracy (9,8%), Joliette (10,7%).

Lachute is at 19,3%, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu 33,9%, Valleyfield 38,3% and Saint-Jérôme 43,6%...
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