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  #28041  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 3:34 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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note to self:
Must Find Photo Of Burl Room.

_____





What a difference a few years can make.


The G.M. Hoff building (1904) back in 2007.


gsv


And in 2015.


gsv


gsv
entrance detail

Does anyone know who G.M. Hoff was?

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 29, 2015 at 8:54 PM.
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  #28042  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 4:34 PM
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Burl's

Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
I found this matchbook on eBay a few nights ago.


eBay

The Burl Room on Hollywood Boulevard and Burls Restaurant No 2 on W Pico Boulevard both appear in the 1956 CD (below). The 1960 CD has The Burl Room and Burls Restaurant on Hollywood Boulevard (I couldn't see the W Pico location, but the later CDs don't seem to list that area). Burls Restaurant continues to appear at 4483 Hollywood Boulevard throughout the 1960s, but is listed as Burls Coffee Shop in 1973. The 1987 CD lists the Chinese Garden Cafe at 4483 Hollywood Boulevard.


LAPL

Despite the Hollywood Boulevard restaurant existing for at least 17 years, I haven't managed to find a picture of it.
While selling newspapers as a 11-12 year old kid one of the places i sold at was in front of Burl's at where Hollywood Bl. and Hillhurst cross. Hollywood Bl. starts here at Sunset Bl. which bend off. At that time as far as I remember it was a coffee shop, there may have been a lounge but not sure. Next door was the Vista Theater and down the street was a movie studio (now KCET). I had regular customers that I would bring papers too inside. Across the street was a drive in and another studio lot on Sunset. There was a lot of traffic and foot traffic there then and I sold lots of papers.
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  #28043  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 4:39 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post


Does anyone know who G.M. Hoff was?

__


No.

G. M. Hoff Building AKA Hoff's Rooming House
116 East 5th Street 90013
Built 1904
Preston and Seehorn, Architects

Another example of Preston and Seehorn's work:
Irvine House (1906)
3115 Brockton Avenue
Riverside, California 92501


gsv

Last edited by tovangar2; Apr 28, 2015 at 5:13 PM.
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  #28044  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 4:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
The G.M. Hoff building (1904).... in 2015.


gsv


gsv
entrance detail

Does anyone know who G.M. Hoff was?

__

Unless the extra fillip was a later embellishment, I'm surprised that C M Hoff didn't object to the stylizing of his first initial...


Times March 1 & 20, 1904:

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  #28045  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 5:11 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Huh. Maybe his son George did that after he inherited. (speculation)
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  #28046  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 6:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollywood Graham View Post
While selling newspapers as a 11-12 year old kid one of the places i sold at was in front of Burl's at where Hollywood Bl. and Hillhurst cross. Hollywood Bl. starts here at Sunset Bl. which bend off. At that time as far as I remember it was a coffee shop, there may have been a lounge but not sure. Next door was the Vista Theater and down the street was a movie studio (now KCET). I had regular customers that I would bring papers too inside. Across the street was a drive in and another studio lot on Sunset. There was a lot of traffic and foot traffic there then and I sold lots of papers.
What years would that have been?
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  #28047  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 6:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

The G.M. Hoff building in 2015.


gsv
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post

Unless the extra fillip was a later embellishment, I'm surprised that C M Hoff didn't object to the stylizing of his first initial...
A little more on the C M Hoff Building from the July 3, 1904 edition of the Los Angeles Herald.


California Digital Newspaper Collection

BTW. It's clearly marked as the C M Hoff Block on the 1910, 1914 and 1921 Baist maps.


www.historicmapworks.com/www.historicmapworks.com/www.historicmapworks.com
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  #28048  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 10:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
No.

G. M. Hoff Building AKA Hoff's Rooming House
116 East 5th Street 90013
Built 1904
Preston and Seehorn, Architects

Another example of Preston and Seehorn's work:
Irvine House (1906)
3115 Brockton Avenue
Riverside, California 92501


gsv
A bit more about Jasper Newton Preston, if I may. Before he came to Los Angeles was the architect of the Driskill in Austin, among others (Preston & Son worked in Texas from 1875-86, and a large collection of their buildings stand, eight of which are landmarked, of which six are National Register).

Of course, few Prestons remain in Los Angeles. Here is one of his early farmhouses, built just after his arrival in LA, and here is Preston's residence for Andrew Glassell, also 1887. Perhaps best known on Noirish would be his 1891 high school on Fort Moore:



And his 1893 (as Preston & Locke) addition to the Normal School (William Curlett, 1881):




Less well-known perhaps is his Burdick Block:



A standing local treasure is the Bolt House. Another of his great extant structures is the Coconino Court House in Flagstaff (1894).

Preston's son and business partner, Samuel, dies in 1889, whereafter Preston works with Seymour Locke (1893-94), Don MacKenzie (1896), Norman F Marsh (1900-01), and Ira H Seehorn (1902-07).

Preston retired in '07, at age 76, who had for many years been president of the AIA Southern Chapter, was made a life member of the AIA. He passes in 1922.
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  #28049  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 10:26 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Beaudry View Post
A bit more about Jasper Newton Preston, if I may.
The LA Conservancy says Preston was also architect of our old Hall of Records. Is that true? Because I've also read it was Frank Hudson and William Munsel. Good info on the guy is elusive (except from you of course). Thx
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  #28050  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2015, 11:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post


The LA Conservancy says Preston was also architect of our old Hall of Records. Is that true? Because I've also read it was Frank Hudson and William Munsel. Good info on the guy is elusive (except from you of course). Thx
Yeah, I raised an eyebrow at that too, but don't have time right now to do a full dig. I can say this: the Hall of Records with which we're all familiar is absolutely Hudson & Munsell. And it's later than Preston anyway, as he retired in 1907, and H&R get the commission in December of that year.

So, Preston arrives in 1887, does he design and there is built a Hall of Records? I don't think so. There was already one, it seems, across from City Hall, according to this. Plus, LA was gearing up for a new Court House: after 1891, and the completion of the County Court House, the Hall of Records was inside, on the first floor, on the New High St side, of the County Courthouse.

JN Preston & Son did "put in a finely executed plan for our new courthouse, which was very much admired" (per the Herald, 5 June 1887). Maybe it is from here the confusion arises? More work on this needs to be done!
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  #28051  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 12:57 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Engine Company No. 23

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
P.S. Interesting post on Crossroads of the World, T2!
Thanks. I updated that post with a couple more photos, including one of the scene of the crime.

I was looking into how racketeer Charlie Crawford ended up in LA to begin with.
He ran a huge club/casino/bordello operation, "The Northern", up in Seattle, with the compliant mayor of the time in his pocket. However, when it was revealed that the land under Charlie's operation was leased from the city, a reform mayor swept into office and Charlie had to get out of town.

Charlie Crawford in circa 1915:

find a grave

In 1911 32-year-old Crawford headed to LA to try his chances. He opened the Maple Bar at 230 E 5th Street, corner of Maple Avenue South (just across from the then-new Firehouse No. 23). But, of course, it wasn't just a bar. There was a casino in back and bordello upstairs. Crawford put his Seattle experience to work, currying favor with LA's political elite and deeply insinuating himself with the LA underworld (acting as a very useful go-between), until the day came, ten years later, when he could take over the town.

The site of the Maple Bar (left) across from Fire Station No. 23 (and a block down from the G.M. Hoff Building):

gsv


historic mapworks

Fire Station No. 23, built in 1910 at 225 E 5th to a Tudor-esque design by Hudson and Munsel, was already mired in controversy when Charlie arrived on the scene. Budgeted at $35K, it ended up costing $53K, an enormous amount. It was said $25K was spent on the 3rd-floor Chief's quarters alone. The Peruvian mahogany, Vermont marble, French beveled-glass mirrors and leather-paneled walls may have had something to do with the cost. FO Engstrom Co were the builders. The Fire Commissioners denied all knowledge of the luxurious appointments until it was revealed they had approved every one. The newspapers called it the "Taj Mahal" of fire houses.

In the September 29, 1910 edition the Los Angeles Times called it "most elaborate and richest engine-house west of New York...the most ornate ... in this or any other world." The public was outraged.

I'm sure Charlie Crawford helped to assuage the LAFD's embarrassment.

The Aug 3, 1909 permit:


ladbs

Fire Station No. 23 was LAFD HQ from 1910 to 1920. Every LAFD Chief lived there from 1910 to 1928.

The station was just 26 feet across but stretched 167 feet from E 5th through to Winston Street. It housed 12 firemen (including their Captain) and 10 horses, plus the Chief. The 21 foot ceilings on the ground floor were of pressed steel, the walls of green, glazed tile. Six fire poles descended from the second to the ground floor. The Chief's pole, in a closet in his living quarters, made a quick run to the second floor. An elevator "moves noiselessly and stealthily to the upper haven" (according to the LA Times). The third-floor hay and supply storage rooms were also accessed by elevator.

The East 5th Street facade:

ca 1912:

lafire

n.d.

lafire

1940's(?):

LAT/Prelinger archive

1950s:

lafire

ca 1965:

LA Planning department via beyondthemarquee

Dressed for "The Mask" (1994):

newlinecinema

ca 2005:

wiki

2014:

gsv



The Winston St Entrance:

ca. 1911:

lafire

1916:

lafire

1938. The Rescue Company:

lafire

Dressed for "Police Academy 2" (1984)

warnerbros


gsv


The Ground Floor:

1915 (the last horse-drawn engine went out on call 29 August 1921).

lafire

Also 1915. Cranking up Truck No. 5:

lafire

I have to pause for a minute to show you Truck No. 5 at the Winston Street entrance because it's such a beaut. A 1911 Seagrave AC-90 (complete with aerial ladder), it went into service on May Day 1912, one of the first two trucks purchased by the LAFD. Later known as "the ill-fated truck", because on 2/12/1922 it collided with a streetcar at the intersection of 9th and Stanford resulting in one death. n.d.:

lafire

1960 (the year the station was decommissioned):

lafire

Ivan Reitman prepping the real estate agent scene, Ghostbusters (1984)

beyondthemarquee

The real estate agent scene, Ghostbusters (1984)

columbia pictures

Ghostbusters:

columbia pictures

Ghostbusters:

columbia pictures


bf3s forums


theraffon.net


theraffon.net

"Flashpoint" (1998)

adam&eveproductions


theraffon.net


theraffon.net


The Second Floor:


theraffon.net

The dormitory in 1915 (the Captain had private quarters elsewhere on the second floor):

lafire

The dormitory dressed for Ghostbusters (1984)

beyondthemarquee

The dormitory now:

theraffon.net

The Day Room in 1915:

lafire

The Day Room fireplace today:

theraffon.net


theraffon.net

The building is shot through with nice skylights/lightwells:

theraffon.net


The Third Floor:

I could find no "then" photos of the third floor Chief's quarters, understandable I suppose, given the controversy. There's not many "now" pix either. There was/is a huge master suite (with a tub big enough for two chiefs the LA Times claimed), two further bedrooms with bath, reception room, dining room, a kitchen and access to the roof.

The leather inserts in the Peruvian mahogany paneling are gone:

theraffon.net


theraffon.net

The Tudor-style ceiling:

theraffon.net

Ghostbusters II (1989)

columbia pictures

The top of the stairs:

theraffon.net

The Chief's pole in the closet arrangement:

theraffon.net

Engine Company 23's first really big fire was in 1913 at the 1894 Byrne Building, W 3rd and S Broadway, across from City Hall. It took 10 hours to put it out:

uscdl (detail)

A good portrait of the equipment at work at the Bryne fire:

usc libraries

Engine Company No. 23 did a good job at the Byrne, also known as the Irvine Byrne and the Pan-American Building. (The architects were Sumner Hunt with Morgan and Walls). It's fine:

gsv

Station No. 23 also had a later controversy. The station was decommissioned in 1960, but kept for storage until '66, then locked and left. In 1979 (by which time scavengers had looted the building of anything of value, including the fire poles) it was chosen as the site for an LAFD musem. A committee, "Olde 23", was formed by senior LAFD officials to solicit donations for the museum. Trouble is, even after plans for the museum were transferred to Engine Company No. 27 in Hollywood, funds kept rolling in to Olde 23. Plus filming fees were not turned over to the city. The then-Chief had to resign.

Next the LAFD leased the station to artists. They've been trying to evict the one in residence now almost since he moved in.

No. 23 is a very popular filming location for movies, commercials and music videos
(it's also been used on occasion as a venue for live music shows):

Hammet (1982)
Ghostbusters (1984)
Police Academy II (1985)
Big Trouble in Little China (1986)
The A-Team (1986)
Ghostbusters II (1989)
VI Warshawski (1991)
Flatliners(1991)
The Mask (1994)
Lost Highway (1997)
Flashpoint (1998)
National Security (2003)
RE(e)volution (2005)
Body Heat (2010)
etc.

More info and pix:
wikipedia
Big Orange Landmarks
LAFD Historical Archive page 1 (lafire)
LAFD Historical Archive page 2
LAFD Historical Archive page 3
Spook Central (theraffon.net)
LA Downtown News
Beyond the Marquee
I AM NOT A STALKER
Ghostbusters (1984)
BF2S Forum
Seagrave AC-90

There's also 5 rather poorly-produced 2010 tour videos of the fire station. The first one is here if you're interested.
In one or another of them there's glimpses of the kitchen and dining room, plus they spend a lot of time on the roof.

For more info on Charlie Crawford and the Maple Bar see A Bright and Guilty Place (preview) (2009) Richard Rayner



LAFD is looking to sell (with restrictions) if anyone's interested:

gsv

Last edited by tovangar2; Nov 17, 2015 at 6:29 PM. Reason: fix link & add images
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  #28052  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 4:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I really like that image of Marilyn at Castle Rock t2. I wonder what's happening in that Google aerial?



"Downtown Los Angeles, 1970s."


For some reason I've always liked the look of those old fashioned buses with the "clerestory" windows above the regular ones. Nonetheless, the idea of taking an SCRTD bus from DTLA all the way to Fullerton Station makes me sad. I do recall that the only public transit alternative, in the late 1970s, was three Amtrak trains a day; were there ever fewer than that?
__________________
The new Wandering In L.A. post is published!

A Couple Of Before-And-Afters That Won't Make You Sad
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  #28053  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 5:13 AM
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Hollywood Graham Hollywood Graham is offline
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Burl's

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
What years would that have been?
About 1954-55. Very lax child labor laws then compared to today.
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  #28054  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 9:12 AM
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Looking west over ELA Park, February 3, 1910

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
NYPL http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1640789&t=w

Google Street View

The New York Public Library maintains a few vintage images of Los Angeles--the most interesting one I've seen so far is this undated one of a small Eastside park I'd never heard of: ELA Park. (It took me a minute to catch it... E.L.A. Park....) I'm getting more and more interested in Los Angeles east of Main Street--if you don't live there (in NY, for instance), it seems a parallel universe to the L.A. west of Main usually envisioned. The gang troubles there I also read about notwithstanding, it's been interesting to discover whole tidy neighborhoods to the east like this one around ELA Park.
Here, from Thomas Street above the park (where the tall palm trees are), is a rough approximation of the 1910 photo. In the lower left corner a red
arrow points to the roof of a house, which today is 2544 Eastlake Avenue:

GSV Sept 2014

1910; in the lower left corner is the house (2544 Eastlake) noted by the red arrow in the previous photo. Across the street from 2544, separated by
a vacant lot, are 2521 and 2533 Eastlake Avenue:

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/re...coll65/id/3129

Here are 2521 and 2533 closer:


And here they are at left and right in April 2014:

GSV

If you look above 2521 and 2533 Eastlake a few blocks on the 1910 photo, you'll see an industrial building with two large smokestacks. That's a Los
Angeles Railway Co. building at the SW corner of North Broadway and Workman Street. The church-like building to the west, according to the 1906
Sanborn map, is the 2nd Presbyterian Church on the SW corner of North Broadway and Daly Street:


Here's the Los Angeles Railway building on the 1906 Sanborn (Downey Avenue will be renamed North Broadway):

LAPL

Finally, a Googlemap of the wider area: https://www.google.com/maps/place/25...de38114a?hl=en

Last edited by Flyingwedge; Apr 29, 2015 at 10:23 AM. Reason: better googlemap
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  #28055  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 10:06 AM
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The Beverly Comstock Hotel and Apartments at 10300 Wilshire Boulevard.



eBay

From the USCDL:

Photograph of an artist's conception of Beverly-Comstock Hotel and Apartments. Palm trees are planted on the perimeter of the corner lot. Four automobiles of 1950s vintage are driving on the adjacent street or front curved drive.; "Beverly-Comstock Hotel and Apartments, 10300 Wilshire boulevard, just opened at a cost of $2,500,000. Owned by Irving Berman, the structure contains 62 units, underground parking, swimming pool, patio, coffee shop and other facilities. Designer is Kenneth Lind, AIA. A brilliant premiere was held Wednesday night, attended by notables, hosted by Berman, and Mrs. Edward G. Robinson Sr., displayed and elaborate collection of paintings and objects of art in her apartment in the new building" -- Examiner clipping attached to verso, dated, "December 16, 1956". Verso dated, "December 30, 1956".; Streetscape.


USC Digital Library

According to franksreelreviews.com, it was in room 216 of the Beverly Comstock Hotel that 22-year-old comedian and actor Freddie Prinze shot himself in front of his business manager in 1977.

The Beverly Comstock Hotel is now known as the Beverly Hills Plaza Hotel and Spa.


GSV
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  #28056  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 2:06 PM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollywood Graham View Post
About 1954-55. Very lax child labor laws then compared to today.
That makes us essentially the same age. We lived in Hollywood until '53 when we moved to the Valley. By virtue of my father's membership in the Retail Clerks Union we had Kaiser health insurance and used the Kaiser Permanente hospital at the corner of Sunset and Edgemont which is very close to your old stomping grounds. We probably crossed paths.
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  #28057  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 4:32 PM
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CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
Here, from Thomas Street above the park (where the tall palm trees are), is a rough approximation of the 1910 photo. In the lower left corner a red
arrow points to the roof of a house, which today is 2544 Eastlake Avenue:

GSV Sept 2014
FlyingW

Very interesting to see the old and new of that little oval park.Fun seeing the old houses still in place and how they have changed over the many years. One had a metal roof and now it has shingles.
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  #28058  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 4:56 PM
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Kaiser

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
That makes us essentially the same age. We lived in Hollywood until '53 when we moved to the Valley. By virtue of my father's membership in the Retail Clerks Union we had Kaiser health insurance and used the Kaiser Permanente hospital at the corner of Sunset and Edgemont which is very close to your old stomping grounds. We probably crossed paths.
Just might have crossed paths you never know. I had a concession for parking cars at Smugglers Inn in the building that housed Retail Clerks Union (my wife was a member) that was in '69. Smugglers was part of Associated Host who owned Coffee Dan's and Diamond Jims. My Father had Ross Loos (the first health care insurance) with the City of L.A. then Kaiser. My wife had Kaiser so I was with them a long time.
I rode my bike or took the street cars into Hollywood a lot spending the money at movie theaters I made selling papers. You might have been in the same theater.
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  #28059  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 5:41 PM
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Thanks for the follow-ups on Burls Room/Restaurant. I still haven't found a picture, but this 1951 shot of the Vista Theater must come close. If Burls was open in 1951, it would have been just beyond the "BEER" sign on the left. The description and summary for this picture are:

The theater, originally known as Bard's Hollywood Theatre, was designed by Lewis A. Smith and opened in 1923.

Front exterior view of the Egyptian revival style Vista Theater, located at 4473 Sunset Drive in the Los Feliz district of Los Angeles. Various businesses are seen next door, as well as down Hollywood Boulevard on the left. The following movies are listed on the marquee: "Young and the Damned," "Gypsy's Flamenco" and "Satin Slippers."



LAPL

From cinematreasures.org, here it is as Bard's Hollywood Theatre.


cinematreasures.org

And here's a night view of the Vista Theater, posted a couple of weeks ago by tovangar2 in a collection of Herman J. Schultheis neon photos.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
The Vista Theater today.


GSV
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  #28060  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 7:34 PM
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Hello, all! It came to my attention that all of the photos in my past posts were no longer working. I switched them over to Flickr to solve that problem.
I am repsoting my post from September because I don't think anyone ever got to see it due to my photos not working properly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pwrof3 View Post
I was down at the Long Beach Historical Society last Friday for their new exhibit. They have an amazing collection of postcards, photos, etc.
Anyway, I wander around a darkened, forgotten corner only to come face to face with this:

ALL PHOTOS BY ME
20140906_041215976_iOS by ryanrpalmer, on Flickr
What exactly is this? A piece of the entryway to the Pacific Coast Club in Long Beach. Very noirish quality.

20140906_041223767_iOS by ryanrpalmer, on Flickr

20140906_041231956_iOS by ryanrpalmer, on Flickr
Here is a picture of said entryway.

20140906_041241433_iOS by ryanrpalmer, on Flickr

20140906_041253750_iOS by ryanrpalmer, on Flickr


And then I walked further down this hallway and came across this beauty:
20140906_041444777_iOS by ryanrpalmer, on Flickr
A complete model of the exterior of the Pacific Coast Club!
What a beauty of a building. Such a shame it couldn't be saved.

20140906_041457198_iOS by ryanrpalmer, on Flickr

20140906_041514829_iOS by ryanrpalmer, on Flickr

I would love to see interiors. What an amazing building. And those turrets and entryway - very noir!
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