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  #201  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2012, 1:58 AM
nygirl1 nygirl1 is offline
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The best of Long Island: Part 13: Lynbrook

Lynbrook is a village in south western Nassau County. It was originally called Pearsall’s Corner after a General Store which had become a famous stage coach stop for many in the region. It then became known as the five corners but in 1894 the name was officially changed to Lynbrook. The name is derived from Brooklyn and it’s two syllables. This naming was a tribute to the borough and the many residents at the turn of the century in Lynbrook who once called Brooklyn home. By the middle of the 20th century it became home to many second generation, working class Italians and Jews. The area continued to develop and boom in population throughout the 70’s and 1980’s taking on a much more diverse range of peoples coming in from areas in and around New York City. Today it is a typical commuter suburb.
















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  #202  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2012, 2:02 AM
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The best of Long Island: Part 14: The Five Towns

The five towns area of Long Island is composed of Hewlett, Cedarhurst, Woodmere, Lawrence and Inwood. These communities sit along the south shore of Nassau County and in close proximity to Far Rockaway and communities in Queens. The area was settled in the early 17th century and is considered one the oldest settled regions of Long Island. The Five Towns during this time was mostly desolate cow pastures, small farms, grazing land and road side inns.



The first of the major land owners in the region was the Hewlett family who had settled in the area of the Five Towns where the community named after them today sits. Over the years farmers and those who worked on the land built small communities within Hewlett from the Bay on up into the coastal plains. Hewlett became home to prestigious schools and a real estate company began marketing “Sunbury homes”, hotels followed and Hewlett became a resort destination which drew in crowds from Brooklyn and New York City who could afford to travel there. Throughout the 19th century, yacht clubs were organized and casinos were built. Year long residents began building large estates near the harbor and as rail was built through Hewlett it brought in a middle class that built more modest homes north of the harbor area. In the 20th century notorious mobster, Arnold Rothstein mixed business with organized crime as he ran a few of the areas casinos finding that the wealthier classes were better at losing their money than the hardened gamblers in New York where the mobster was based out of. The casinos, like Rothstein were faded out after the depression and the area rolled back to its earlier, quiet, small town ambiance. The population grew during the mid 20th century and began taking on large populations of Jewish people from every sect, today they are the largest group in Hewlett and dominate everything within the community.




















During the early 1800’s the community of Woodsburgh was established by Samuel Wood who purchased land in the hopes to turn it into a stylish resort community. Hotels and vacation cottages were built up before the land was sold to Manhattan entrepreneur, Robert Burton later on in the 19th century. Burton did not share the same aspirations as Wood had and was quite taken by the distant community of Garden City to the north, near Hempstead. He envisioned a suburb based on picturesque Garden City complete with large single family homes, clubs, post offices and elegant shops. Burton’s suburb was a success and attracted the savvy business classes of New York City who packed the neighborhood, then, served by rail during the late 19th century. The name was changed in 1890 to Woodmere to counter the confusion with another Long Island town called Woodbury. The community grew very popular as the five towns progressed during the early 20th century. Jewish families from New York City flocked to Woodmere long before white flight and began making a name for themselves in the five towns creating establishments along Broadway and West Broadway. Large apartment buildings were built up during the depression near the rail station to accommodate the continuous growth of the neighborhood. Throughout the rest of the 20th century Woodmere grew popular with New York City’s Jews and Jews who had fled Europe during the war. Today it is home to an extremely large modern orthodox Jewish community.



















During the late 17th century the Lawrence brothers established their community which bares the same name as the family along the shores of the Five Towns. Hundreds of mansions spanned the landscape and Lawrence was home to an Upper Class farming community. It remained this way for hundreds of years before transforming into a beach resort community. The town built up north of the beaches, golf course and large scale estates and drew in upper middle classes from the city looking for peace and quiet. Major racial restrictions denied other groups from moving to the area until the 1940’s when heaps of New York City Jews began moving into Lawrence. Today they remain the largest group in the town.

















Cedarhurst wasn’t incorporated into the Five towns until the early years of the 20th century. Cedarhurst was home to a wealthy class of entrepreneurs who enjoyed the luxury of telephone systems, paved roads, fire departments and electric connections before most areas of Long Island could. The town grew a significant population which boasted the Play house theater, Cedarhurst meat market and elegant boutiques. The town also housed several members of the KKK who rioted in the 20’s during a world war one memorial. The KKK died down after the 1920’s nationwide and members who lived in Cedarhurst alienated themselves from the affluent community and were never heard of in the area again. Instead during the white flight years, wealthy and middle class New York Jews moved into the area and dominate Cedarhurst by nearly 100% today.

























Inwood was established in the early 19th century and after the railroad was introduced opened up to industry and a booming industrious population. Italians began moving into the area in droves in the early years of the 20th century in fact it is the only one of the Five Towns not dominated by a Jewish population, Italians still exist in Inwood today, however the neighborhood opened up to Hispanics and African Americans during the 1990’s.









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  #203  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2012, 2:10 AM
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The best of Long Island: Part 15: City of Long Beach and Nassau County Beach

Atlantic Beach is an affluent village on the south shore of Long Island on a barrier Island along the Nassau County Beaches. The community served as a beach resort for the wealthy of New York for many years before becoming a year round residential village for affluent families in the county of Nassau. The dominant groups in Atlantic Beach are Jewish and Italian. The area features dozens of cabana style beach clubs many of which are rented out by families from south shore neighborhoods most notably the Five Towns. While there are businesses in Atlantic Beach the community is quite small and the majority of it is residential. It shares its history with Long Beach, a city directly to the east of the village.

























Long Beach is a city on a barrier island along the beaches of the south shore of Nassau County. English Colonists purchased the land from Algonquin tribes back in 1643 and for centuries was used by baymen and fisherman who harvested salt hay and fished off the island but no one lived in Long Beach year round for hundreds of years. In the late 19th century a Brooklyn Developer named Austin Corbin developed Long Beach as a resort community and established a partnership with rail companies to reach the barrier island. He built a large hotel and dozens of cottages along the beaches. The hotel burned down at the turn of the 20th century right around the time the Long Beach boardwalk was planned and built. Homes and businesses blossomed and were built in an eclectic Mediterranean style, the beach and boardwalk were successful drawing in summer crowds that swelled the city. Soon the area would be come home to many who wished to live in the “Riviera of the east” year round. The developers restricted residency in the area to White Anglo Saxon Protestants only but this restriction was dropped in 1918 and the community opened up to anyone who could afford to live in Long Beach. The area became quite popular in the roaring 1920’s due to the location and several hotels where bootlegging was common. By the middle of the 20th century with cheaper air flights the allure of Long Beach began to fade and vacationers started seeking other locations to summer in. The city turned into a bedroom community and by the 1970’s Long Beach had seen its final days as a resort area to vacation in. The many hotels along the boardwalk became run-down and began to serve as temporary housing for welfare recipients.
Drugs became an issue as the neighborhood as a whole began to deteriorate and degenerate. Some hotels were designated for mental patients coming out of the regions larger institutions. Crime rose during the 70’s and 80’s and instead of frequenting the city’s beaches and most were detracted from the declined city. However, it is in the late 80’s that urban renewal took shape in Long Beach and continued to rebuild the community back up well into the 1990’s. The city today is once again on the rise, its run down bungalows and Park Avenue businesses have been restored. The boardwalk hotels no longer house the mentally ill and most were converted into condos and apartments. In the cramped West End a bar scene emerged though they are not alone as boutiques and restaurants also line the main drag bringing the dense area back to life. Park Avenue at the center of the city is known locally as the place to go to when dining out. Long Beach is split into unofficial neighborhoods.
The East end has The Canals and South Park (South of Park or SoPa) the former is north of Park Avenue and consists of dense housing along several canals that spill out into the bay. The latter is the historic residential section where the city began. This is where the boardwalk and red brick streets are as well as the hotels and apartment buildings that sit above the rest of the city. Park Avenue is just one stretch of road but with all the major businesses, train station, city hall and other municipal buildings it is billed as downtown. North of Park Avenue between the bridge and train station is North Park, home to the city’s Puerto Rican and African American communities but outside of this area anything else north of the strip is known as “the bay section”. The West End is home to the city’s night life and hang out’s. It is split between “The walks”, “The President streets” and Westholme. Long Beach is quite diverse also home to reformed Jews and Hasidic sects of the Jewish community, West Indians and African Americans, Puerto Ricans and Central Americans, Mexican and South Asian as well as 3rd and 4th generation Italians, Polish, Russian, Irish and Germans. There are college students in the west end who rent out bungalows as well as a small artistic community of 20’s and 30 something’s. The East End is mostly middle-working class. North Park is generally working class but is one of the city’s poorest sections while the Bay and South Park house the upper-middle class.


The West End































The Park Avenue Strip

























South of Park Avenue


































The East End and Canal Zone

















Lido Beach
Lido Beach is an area to the east of Long Beach and shares much of its history with the city. Its an upscale community mostly white and largely Jewish. Most of the community is north of Park Avenue and built out towards the Bay though houses were built during the 80’s and 90’s closer to the beach.




















Point Lookout


Point Lookout is a hamlet on a barrier island along the beaches of Nassau County and is east of the city of Long Beach. The area is both a year round and summer rental neighborhood. Its streets are private but open to automobile and foot traffic while its beaches are not. There is a public beach in Point Look Out which is closer to the string of other beaches spanning the island.














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  #204  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2012, 2:12 AM
nygirl1 nygirl1 is offline
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Sorry for the last post...its a bit of a doozy. This thread should really have a 56k disclaimer, if anyone can change that for me it would be greatly appreciated...

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  #205  
Old Posted May 29, 2012, 11:56 PM
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Love these series!!!

Last edited by fleonzo; Jun 8, 2012 at 12:31 AM.
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  #206  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2012, 2:07 PM
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Great set. Long Island is such a mystery to me, despite spending half my life in the NYC metro area. It's so vast that I never make it over to that side.
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  #207  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2015, 1:08 PM
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Possibly the most epic active SSP thread. Resurrected for posterity.
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