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  #45341  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 5:00 PM
galleyfox galleyfox is offline
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Originally Posted by woodrow View Post
Future growth? I actually did not know that ridership is dropping. That surprises me, given the explosive growth of the west loop. Any theories about why it is dropping?

Right now, if you miss a westbound train, you can be waiting a long time, and then you get on a very crowded train. Admittedly I am talking about State/Lake which is one of the last loop stations and is very crowded.
The neighborhoods beyond the West Loop are still losing population, and even if they were gentrified, wealthier residents are still more likely to favor cars than public transit outside of rush hour. Uber and Lyft and easy access to cars in general is hammering public transit during off-peak hours around the nation.
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  #45342  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 5:13 PM
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MayorOfChicago MayorOfChicago is offline
You had me at herro...
 
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Originally Posted by Via Chicago View Post
right this was my point. the goal was 1 million trees over 10 years, we planted something like 100k, and due to all the losses due to disease/age/weather on top of it, our canopy is being lost. and many of the saplings the city plants i doubt make it to maturity, simply look at how many stumps are along major commercial corridors or downtown (to say nothing of the fact that every developer chainsaws everything within a block radius every time they initiate a project). not to mention the city wont plant a parkway tree unless a resident specifically requests one
I actually pull out my 311 App and it's quite easy to request a tree along the parkways. When I walk my kids in their stroller I sit there and boom boom boom, request trees as I walk where I see they are missing or lost - even though it's not my property. I thought it would be fruitless - but alas as I walk now I see new trees going in one by one where I pointed them out.
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  #45343  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 5:30 PM
k1052 k1052 is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr Downtown View Post
Why, exactly? Ridership is quite modest—less than many bus routes—and dropped in 2017 (last full year for which data is available).
Per the CTA's own capacity study the Green line is at capacity between Clark/Lake and Kedzie during PM rush.
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  #45344  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 5:43 PM
woodrow woodrow is offline
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Originally Posted by k1052 View Post
Per the CTA's own capacity study the Green line is at capacity between Clark/Lake and Kedzie during PM rush.
So this is a real conundrum...they need more capacity, say between 7:30 to 9:30 AM and 4:00 PM to 6:00PM, but just to half of the route. And then, the optics would be terrible since it I would wager that most of that is to the most affluent part of the run (west loop). Logistics!
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  #45345  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 5:49 PM
Freefall Freefall is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr Downtown View Post
Why, exactly? Ridership is quite modest—less than many bus routes—and dropped in 2017 (last full year for which data is available).
Full year 2018 data is available. That leg of the green line was actually up for the year by 1.9%. Thanks mostly to a big increase of 15% at the Morgan station.

Source:
https://www.transitchicago.com/asset...ip_2018-12.pdf
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  #45346  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 6:30 PM
Handro Handro is offline
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Originally Posted by MayorOfChicago View Post
I actually pull out my 311 App and it's quite easy to request a tree along the parkways. When I walk my kids in their stroller I sit there and boom boom boom, request trees as I walk where I see they are missing or lost - even though it's not my property. I thought it would be fruitless - but alas as I walk now I see new trees going in one by one where I pointed them out.
Great! I just signed up on the app.
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  #45347  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 7:10 PM
LouisVanDerWright LouisVanDerWright is offline
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Originally Posted by k1052 View Post
The loop can't handle more trains at peak. The CTA could however lengthen rush period Green/Pink Line trains to 8 cars once sufficient rolling stock is available.
They will eventually be able to do this on the Pink Line too given they only run 4 car trains on it. It's amazing how under utilized parts of our transit system is. Makes you wonder if choking off development along the Blue Line for now is actually a healthy planning choice, push that growth to the Pink and Green Lines.

That's the thing, someone just said wealthier people are more likely to use cars, that's just not true. The lowest ridership tends to be in the poorer/working class areas and the highest ridership is the wealthiest areas like the North Side Red and Brown or the NW side with the Blue Line. Meanwhile the transit running through the ultra dense Pilsen and Little Villages is basically untouched. That's generally the case in other cities as well. Turns out poor people are actually highly more likely to rely on cars to get to work because their jobs are more often decentrialized or roving (i.e. construction workers might work at dozens of different job sites during the year). This means a place like Lincoln Park or Wicker Park that is crammed to the gills with yuppies see high transit usage because they all work at professional level salaried jobs that are almost exclusively located downtown near transit.
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  #45348  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 8:09 PM
k1052 k1052 is offline
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Originally Posted by woodrow View Post
So this is a real conundrum...they need more capacity, say between 7:30 to 9:30 AM and 4:00 PM to 6:00PM, but just to half of the route. And then, the optics would be terrible since it I would wager that most of that is to the most affluent part of the run (west loop). Logistics!
The CTA changes train lengths on several lines during the course of the day or day of the week. With more cars this really isn't optics problem since the trains would still run out to the southern termini of the Green line.
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  #45349  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 8:18 PM
galleyfox galleyfox is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LouisVanDerWright View Post
They will eventually be able to do this on the Pink Line too given they only run 4 car trains on it. It's amazing how under utilized parts of our transit system is. Makes you wonder if choking off development along the Blue Line for now is actually a healthy planning choice, push that growth to the Pink and Green Lines.

That's the thing, someone just said wealthier people are more likely to use cars, that's just not true. The lowest ridership tends to be in the poorer/working class areas and the highest ridership is the wealthiest areas like the North Side Red and Brown or the NW side with the Blue Line. Meanwhile the transit running through the ultra dense Pilsen and Little Villages is basically untouched. That's generally the case in other cities as well. Turns out poor people are actually highly more likely to rely on cars to get to work because their jobs are more often decentrialized or roving (i.e. construction workers might work at dozens of different job sites during the year). This means a place like Lincoln Park or Wicker Park that is crammed to the gills with yuppies see high transit usage because they all work at professional level salaried jobs that are almost exclusively located downtown near transit.
"That's the thing, someone just said wealthier people are more likely to use cars, that's just not true. "

I didn't quite say that. I said wealthier people are more likely to take a car during off-peak hours, especially late at night to run local errands. Though it's hurting the bus routes more than the rail. At the same time, the CTA's rush hour statistics are as high as ever for the reasons you bring up. It's a difficult dynamic where the public transit systems are losing revenue but facing increased rush hour congestion.
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  #45350  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2019, 8:24 PM
k1052 k1052 is offline
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Originally Posted by LouisVanDerWright View Post
They will eventually be able to do this on the Pink Line too given they only run 4 car trains on it. It's amazing how under utilized parts of our transit system is. Makes you wonder if choking off development along the Blue Line for now is actually a healthy planning choice, push that growth to the Pink and Green Lines.

That's the thing, someone just said wealthier people are more likely to use cars, that's just not true. The lowest ridership tends to be in the poorer/working class areas and the highest ridership is the wealthiest areas like the North Side Red and Brown or the NW side with the Blue Line. Meanwhile the transit running through the ultra dense Pilsen and Little Villages is basically untouched. That's generally the case in other cities as well. Turns out poor people are actually highly more likely to rely on cars to get to work because their jobs are more often decentrialized or roving (i.e. construction workers might work at dozens of different job sites during the year). This means a place like Lincoln Park or Wicker Park that is crammed to the gills with yuppies see high transit usage because they all work at professional level salaried jobs that are almost exclusively located downtown near transit.
Yea, the Pink Line should be running more cars especially at rush. Hopefully that will happen when the CTA starts getting the CRRC cars in numbers and is able to exercise its options on the contract (thanks state capital bill).

Given the constraints on the Blue Line slowing development along it may not be the worst thing in order to disperse growth. I'd love to see everything from Cermak to Woodlawn pop like the NW part of the city has since the transit infrastructure down there is huge and horribly underutilized at existing service levels and virtually limitless vacant land in comparison.

Last edited by k1052; Jun 15, 2019 at 2:53 PM.
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  #45351  
Old Posted Yesterday, 11:46 AM
Stockerzzz Stockerzzz is offline
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Advocate Health Network is filing a zoning change to “add property on the east side of North Sheffield Avenue between Wellington Street and West Nelson Street to the boundaries of Institutional Planned Development No. 50 in order to allow the construction of a proposed accessory parking garage for approximately 408 cars, with medical offices uses on the ground floor.”

It will change zoning “from B3-2 Community Shopping District and Institutional Planned Development No. 50 to Institutional Planned Development No. 50.”

Can someone help translate? Is it basically that gravel parking lot by Fish Bar will be a parking garage with medical offices on the first floor?
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  #45352  
Old Posted Yesterday, 2:43 PM
ChiPlanner ChiPlanner is offline
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Originally Posted by Stockerzzz View Post
Advocate Health Network is filing a zoning change to “add property on the east side of North Sheffield Avenue between Wellington Street and West Nelson Street to the boundaries of Institutional Planned Development No. 50 in order to allow the construction of a proposed accessory parking garage for approximately 408 cars, with medical offices uses on the ground floor.”

It will change zoning “from B3-2 Community Shopping District and Institutional Planned Development No. 50 to Institutional Planned Development No. 50.”

Can someone help translate? Is it basically that gravel parking lot by Fish Bar will be a parking garage with medical offices on the first floor?
They recently updated their master plan- the parking lot on wellington/sheffield is going to become a parking garage with clinic space on the first floor. In addition there will be infill within their hospital campus on Wellington and Barry. Looks like this could move rather quickly as the two remaining buildings on Wellington next to the Brown Line are already vacant (Andy's Thai Kitchen moved to Diversey thank goodness)
https://www.44thward.org/wp-content/...-2018-0514.pdf






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