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  #3901  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2017, 2:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docta_Love View Post

I'm skeptical about this. Maybe it's a step in the right direction, but it seems far too early in the design process to tell if what they are proposing is truly 'urban'. That rendering looks terribly weak and uninspired. Two-tone, curbless sidewalks and a couple of trees do not equal urban. Hopefully the City and Community input will lead to a better product in the long run.

Quote:
975,000 square feet of residential space, which amounts to almost 700 apartments, townhomes and stacked flats.
That's a lot of units, and lots of thought will be needed on how this connects to (what's left of) the existing neighborhood to the south.

Last edited by deja vu; Jul 4, 2017 at 2:25 AM.
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  #3902  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2017, 4:11 AM
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(Rock Ventures' new proposed Wayne County jail site, currently used by the Detroit Department of Transportation, is generally bounded by the Chrysler Service Drive, East Warren Avenue, East Ferry Street and Russell Street.)
The catch here is "generally." I'm not sure why they messed up so big with the map on this one or did it so generally, when it's been said in more than one publication the proposed site's southern border would be a line drawn west from Frederick. South of Federick is the very-much active DDOT headquarters and central repair facility that is not up for a move anywhere.

Also, the fairgrounds proposal is way more urban than any of the previous proposals by the consortium. Most of it is multi-story stuff built facing the street. It'll be denser than anything historically in the neighborhood at any rate. I'm not worried about the architecture at the moment.
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  #3903  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 12:56 AM
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On the heels of the pushing out of Henry the Hatter - who is now actively being courted by inner-city landlords - comes a story about the rent hikes in the greater downtown area.

Quote:

Junfu Han | Detroit Free Press

Detroit's skyrocketing rents threaten longtime shops

Ashley Zlatopolsky, Special to the Detroit Free Press

July 5, 2017

Grace Harper Florist owner John Kewish doesn’t know how much longer his flower shop can survive in Midtown.

With downtown Detroit’s Henry the Hatter, the oldest hat retailer in the U.S. losing its lease last week, the news of the shop shutting down raises the question of whether longtime businesses are being forced out of the city.

Kewish saw his rent climb from $500 a month when he took over ownership of the Woodward business 20 years ago to $3,450, with a $650 increase in the past 12 months alone. Now, his landlord is asking for an additional $100 a month for rent for the next five years. He claims he can get $5,000 for the place, but Kewish says it isn’t in great condition.
It's a very extensive article that I'd suggest everyone read in full.
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  #3904  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 2:26 AM
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I like this anecdote.

Quote:
The report also shows that 96 storefront businesses have opened or expanded in Midtown and New Center from 2013-16. From the various projects in play, the greater downtown area has just over one million square feet of retail space under construction or expected to be complete by 2020.
This is pretty much equivalent to a new regional mall. Granted the spaces are rather spread out compared to an actual mall, but it's something. It's only a matter of time before Detroit reclaims its position as retail center.
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  #3905  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 1:45 PM
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Quote:
Detroit mansion reopens as 10-room inn after $2.4 million sale
By Tanya Moutzalias | MLive
July 02, 2017

DETROIT-- The Inn at 97 Winder has reopened under new ownership at one of the largest remaining 1870s Victorian homes in Detroit. The 11,000-square-foot Second Empire-style mansion was built in 1876 by pharmaceutical magnate John Harvey in Detroit's Brush Park neighborhood.

...
There's more photos on the article page. Interesting decisions were made with regard to interior décor - a fusion of different styles.


Image Source: Tanya Moutzalias | MLive
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  #3906  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2017, 4:45 PM
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@LMich, these were very moving articles, I'll admit... Sometimes, gentrification can be harsh. But it's always absolutely necessary in my opinion.

Besides, I find some aspects of the American culture is very emotional and over-sentimental. You guys always want to be moved and often try too hard to make the world cry. See what they do in their Hollywood movies for instance. It's awkward.

Sometimes, you have to move on, even when it's harsh.

As for the flower shop, it may be old-fashioned, women sure like flowers, especially when they don't expect any. It's like still surprising, I guess. So I hope locals buy more. Don't be scared to give flowers, it's always cool somehow. Lol.
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  #3907  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2017, 5:54 PM
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It's REALLY sad to see the businesses that stuck it out through the toughest times getting the squeeze by landlords who want to market their space to more "upscale" tenants with deeper pockets. At least if Henry the Hatter wants to continue they have offers from owners in the eastern market area and corktown to relocate and reopen.

Quote:
$100,000 In Grants Up For Grabs For Smart Energy And Mobility Ideas In Detroit
By Daily Detroit Staff
Jun 28, 2017
The Daily Detroit


(Next Energy Center in Midtown, Detroit. Photo via Facebook)

Four organizations have teamed up to help fund ideas for the future. DTE Energy, DENSO, NextEnergy, and Wells Fargo are host a global competition to help address some of these problems. Through the program, technology providers are tasked with proposing hardware and software solutions within one or more of the following categories: smart parking, smart mobility, smart infrastructure, and smart buildings. According to the organizers, innovations should be connected, interactive and data driven (i.e., “smart”), and contribute to safer, more sustainable communities. Concept proposals for the second annual NextChallenge: Smart Cities are due on Aug. 18, 2017. If you’re considering applying, register for the webinar on July 27 to learn more about the challenge. The winner of NextChallenge: Smart Cities will be awarded up to $80,000 in grant funding from Wells Fargo to demonstrate and validate their solution at the NextEnergy Center in Detroit, or an applicable site that meets the needs of the selected solution. An additional combined total of $20,000 will be awarded to as many as four finalists. Monetary awards and programmatic support are funded by a $650,000, three-year grant from Wells Fargo to support NextEnergy’s efforts to drive investment in advanced energy and mobility technologies that address needs in urban communities.

Last year, Callida Energy beat out more than 50 other innovators for the top prize in the inaugural challenge. Callida is now working together with NextEnergy and DTE Energy to select a site to demonstrate the Callida Occupant App solution, which optimizes energy use in commercial buildings. “The prize is allowing us to install our software in a commercial building site, do a baseline, make changes to how the building is operated, and develop a case study for how our solution delivered specific savings for the building,” said Raphael Carty, CEO of Callida Energy in a statement. “Before this challenge, we had a presence in New York and Houston. We saw opportunity in Detroit, but we weren’t known in the market. This competition put us on the map in the region.”
http://www.dailydetroit.com/2017/06/...ideas-detroit/
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  #3908  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2017, 5:58 PM
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I mean, not really. This is what's supposed to happen, the core gets expensive and then businesses and residents move to other neighborhoods within the city making them better and more desirable in the process.
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  #3909  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2017, 6:10 PM
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I agree that its economics but i remember when i was young going downtown back in the 90's back when the Hudson's was still up and in terms of retail downtown outside of the Millender Center and Greektown the choices were few and far between. It's a piece of old Detroit that will have to change with the times as we all do but as someone who undoubtedly made sacrifices to stay downtown its unfair that more deference isn't paid to those who "kept the lights on" during Detroit's darkest days.
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  #3910  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2017, 4:18 AM
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I honestly wasn't making a value judgement either way. In fact, I advised everyone to read the article because it is a fairly detailed and neutral article on the phenomenon showing both good and bad aspects of what's going on. Even many of those being pushed out aren't exactly bitter about what's going on.

That said "just move to another part of the city" is also an over-simplistic view of things said by folks who don't really know what it takes to move a business or find a comparable location. It's not that easy. Gentrification isn't some unmitigated good; there are obviously trade-offs. I guess if I'd make a value judgement at all it's that I'd like to see the DEGC being as quick as they are with helping Henry the Hatter stay in town with all of the other's who'll be priced out. Maybe Detroit can be better than most at mitigating this, and as far as residents they already are with Duggan being very committed to offering low-income housing units in most of the larger residential developments.
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  #3911  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2017, 10:13 PM
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I was poking around looking at the tallest buildings currently under construction in the US. I was looking for something of a similar height and massing as the proposed building for the Hudson's Block.

I came across this: 252 East 57th Street in New York. Clocks in at 712' whereas the Hudson's Block should be 734.

Something of this height in that location is going to be wild. I can't wait to see the damn thing go up.

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  #3912  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2017, 11:30 PM
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That's a nice tower, how have I not seen that before?
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  #3913  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2017, 2:53 PM
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  #3914  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2017, 3:42 AM
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Speaking of parks, Atwater Beach is getting closer and closer to its fundraising goal.

Quote:


Atwater Beach project getting $50,000 Gannett grant

By Ann Zaniewski | Detroit Free Press

July 14, 2017

Detroit's RiverWalk has a big gap.

The sidewalk dead-ends at an old boat slip between Chene Park and Jos. Campau, where trash litters a weedy lot amid tangled bunches of discarded lures and fishing line.

The area is ripe for transformation — and it just got a financial boost.

The Gannett | USA TODAY NETWORK's "A Community Thrives" program is awarding $50,000 to the planned Atwater Beach development. The project, spearheaded by the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy, will give the site a makeover, adding a sandy beach, floating entertainment barge, sensory garden for kids and other features.

So far, they've raised $275,000 of their $1 million goal. In other news, the Freep also has a story out about MoGo and the QLine with the gist being that the users want more of everything.

Quote:

John Gallagher

Shake-down periods suggest tweaks for Detroit's QLINE and MoGo services

By John Gallagher | Detroit Free Press

July 14, 2017

Time for some tweaks.

Detroit's QLINE streetcar and MoGo bike sharing programs have been up and running for a short while. Both are proving popular with the public. And already, as expected, the public isn't shy about offering suggestions to better each one.

In a word, everyone just wants more. More cars on the QLINE, faster rides, an extended route. More docking stations for the MoGo bikes so the system can serve more areas of the city. More protected bike lanes to separate bike riders from motorists.
In the short-term, the QLine is looking to implement signal control to accelerate the speed of trips along the line. I think they realize in the long-term, however, that they need to expand the line and add more cars. But, that can't happen until the RTA is able to promise dedicated funding.
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  #3915  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2017, 3:48 PM
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Quote:
More affordable housing preserved and planned in 4 Detroit neighborhoods
BY ROBIN RUNYAN
JUL 13, 2017
Curbed Detroit



The City of Detroit announced a big commitment in affordable housing across the city. According to a press release, the city was selected by the Michigan State Housing Development Authority (MSHDA) to receive a limited number of 9 percent low-income housing tax credits that will create or preserve 385 units of affordable housing in Core City, Midtown, Brush Park, and the Oakman Boulevard Community.

The four developments total a combined investment of $110 million, with $4.4 million in tax credits from MSHDA.

The announcement assures that 271 units of affordable housing that could have lost that status will be renovated and will keep that status for another 30 years. 114 new affordable units, many of which will be for families earning less than 30 percent of the area’s Average Median Income (AMI), will be built.
https://detroit.curbed.com/2017/7/13...t-developments


Quote:
Bedrock to add or maintain 700 'affordable' housing units in deal with Detroit
By Crain's Detroit Business
July 11, 2017

Bedrock and the city of Detroit on Monday announced an agreement that will create or maintain an estimate 700 "affordable" housing units.

The residential units will consist of new construction and the preservation of existing affordable housing that would have likely converted to market rate.

“It is important that a wide range of housing options, including affordable ones, are available in Detroit’s growing marketplace,” Bedrock President Dan Mullen said in a news release.

Over the next several years, Bedrock plans to develop up to 3,500 residential rental units in the city.

The agreement, which was to be submitted to City Council on Monday, provides that 20 percent of those units will be affordable housing for households whose income is 80 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI) or less. The affordable units will be primarily located in the greater downtown area, where affordable housing options are needed to ensure downtown and midtown remain accessible for people of all incomes.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...s-deal-detroit


Quote:
Wilson Foundation gives $2 million for 26-mile recreational path in Detroit
By KURT NAGL
July 13, 2017
Crain's Detroit Business

A 26-mile recreational path in Detroit received a boost Thursday with a $2 million grant from the Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation.

The money will be used to fund the design and preconstruction of the unfinished portions of the loop, according to a news release from the city.

Called the Inner Circle Greenway, the nonmotorized path connects the city's neighborhoods, parks, commercial corridors, the riverfront and downtown.

"Thanks to the Wilson Foundation, the city of Detroit is one step closer to getting a network of greenways that will take Detroiters from Eight Mile to the riverfront and everywhere in between," Mayor Mike Duggan said in a statement.

Last month, the city entered an agreement to buy 76 acres from Conrail Inc. for $4.3 million to fill the biggest gap in the trail. The Detroit-based rail service provider's property will become a 7.5-mile section of pathway along the Detroit Terminal Railroad.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...l-path-detroit

Here's an interesting quote from the Detroit Homecoming event held in Michigan Depot.

Quote:
Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said that when he took office in 2014, he sought to mend a "somewhat checkered" relationship the Morouns have had with past city administrations.

The mayor said Matthew Moroun brought him "a list" of issues "he would like to have help on."

Duggan did not disclose what was on Moroun's list. But he did divulge his demand for the billionaire owners of the Ambassador Bridge and a nationwide trucking and logistics business empire.

"I said, 'there's one thing: Every time I read a damn national story about Detroit there's a picture of the train station with the holes in the windows as the international image of the city's decline,'" Duggan said, recalling his conversation with Moroun. "I said, 'I want you to put windows in the train station. And if you do that, everything else will be just fine.'"
I donno about everything else being just fine but i can understand the sentiment very well haha. Here's a link to the article about the SLOW redevelopment of MDC, nothing new except a funny quote sadly.

http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...ation-marathon


Quote:
Grant To Pay For Green Infrastructure For New Protected Bike Lanes In Downtown Detroit
By Daily Detroit Staff
Jul 10, 2017



Today brings news that the Downtown Detroit Partnership (DDP) received a $250,000 grant from the Erb Family Foundation.

The grant will fund green infrastructure and stormwater management improvements as part of the Downtown Bike Network. That’s a 1.6-mile infrastructure project that improves street and sidewalk non-motorized connections throughout the downtown area.

The project will begin in the Capitol Park neighborhood, with the idea that it would expand throughout the city.

“This project represents a significant investment in pilot green infrastructure, and cements our commitment to innovative design and sustainability,” said Eric Larson, CEO, DDP. “It is our intent that this project will be easily replicated in other areas of the city and further throughout the region.”

According to the DDP, the project will improve stormwater management through the installation of permeable pavement and bioswales that capture rainwater.
http://www.dailydetroit.com/2017/07/...ntown-detroit/
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  #3916  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2017, 4:35 PM
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Hi guys, I am living overseas. Thanks for your updates and your photos.
Could you tell me please about the WSU Physicians bldg on Woodward.
Is it on hold or what? Thanks for telling me.
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  #3917  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2017, 5:03 PM
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Originally Posted by RossDetroit View Post
Hi guys, I am living overseas. Thanks for your updates and your photos.
Could you tell me please about the WSU Physicians bldg on Woodward.
Is it on hold or what? Thanks for telling me.
I think it's on indefinite hold if not completely cancelled. The WSU Physicians Group (and its parent WSU School of Medicine) is having some financial problems and (had?) some contract issues with the DMC. Things have been more or less in limbo since 2015.

The new building on Woodward was proposed in 2014 in order to consolidate all of the Metro Detroit locations into one building. It was expected to be complete by 2016. Since 2015, there's been no new updates on the status or timeline of construction.

http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...onstruction-on (article is date December 15, 2015 and just states that the project is on indefinite hold)
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  #3918  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2017, 9:54 PM
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New report on Downtown Detroit from CBRE.

Report: $5.4 billion in construction set in, around downtown Detroit

Highlights:
  • From 2017 to 2020, there will be at least 6,091 new residential units, 1,196 hotel units, and 2.1 million square feet of office space.

  • At least $4 billion dollars of investment is in new construction. The rest is conversion.

  • As of Q1 2017, Detroit's overall office vacancy rate is about 14% with average asking lease rates around $20.50. Class A space is under 10% with rates around $22-$23. As mentioned in another article, Dan Gilbert's Hudson project will likely command $35+.

  • Multifamily vacancy rates are around 4%. Average rent per square feet is $1.40. However, most new construction has been closer to $2. A majority of new units are being built in Downtown (2300), Midtown (1700), and New Center (700).

Note, this data is assumed accurate up to Q1 2017.

Last edited by animatedmartian; Jul 17, 2017 at 10:06 PM.
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  #3919  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2017, 3:06 AM
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A majority of new units are being built in Downtown (2300), Midtown (1700), and New Center (700).
I wonder what the time period of this measurement is? Haven't ever seen any reports showing downtown adding more housing than midtown. Anyway, hope this puts to rest all of the ridiculous assertions in the City Discussions forum that Detroit has added (and is adding) only hundreds of units since the recession. It's been thousands.
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  #3920  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2017, 3:38 AM
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Originally Posted by LMich View Post
I wonder what the time period of this measurement is? Haven't ever seen any reports showing downtown adding more housing than midtown. Anyway, hope this puts to rest all of the ridiculous assertions in the City Discussions forum that Detroit has added (and is adding) only hundreds of units since the recession. It's been thousands.
The numbers are based on expected delivery of units from now to 2020. So basically all the residential projects that'll be completed this year and next year, plus the ones proposed and expected to be complete by 2019 or 2020.

Here's a deeper breakdown of the numbers:

Units to be delivered by year;

Downtown:
2017 - 632
2018 - 452
2019 - 406
2020 - 800

Midtown:
2017 - 139
2018 - 333
2019 - 509
2020 - 401

New Center:
2017 - 0
2018 - 254
2019 - 332
2020 - 162

Lafayette Park:
2017 - 185

Corktown:
2018 - 291
2020 - 269

Eastern Market:
2018 - 82
2020 - 62

Rivertown:
2017 - 278
2020 - 85

Brush Park is listed separate from Midtown:
2020 - 410

There's a graphical error for Brush Park that shows 9 units being delivered in a different year (not sure which) but the color is the same as 2020.

Of course, more proposals could come out soon so no doubt these aren't fixed numbers.

Also of note, there's only been 2,500-3,000 new units from 2009 to 2016. 6,000 within the next 3 years is actually still a pretty dramatic increase. That's like a 433% increase in units per year between the two time frames.

Last edited by animatedmartian; Jul 18, 2017 at 4:04 AM.
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