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Old Posted Jun 30, 2017, 10:43 AM
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Update - Downtown Adj. - FairPark Arena Nearing Completion


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Originally Posted by JMK View Post
New 10,000-seat state Fairpark arena nearing completion and will be ready for Days of ‘47 Rodeo

New facility set to be finished July 1; park officials hope to transform area into a nightlife destination.

http://www.sltrib.com/news/5408572-1...-arena-nearing

A new 10,000-seat arena at the Utah State Fairpark is 95 percent complete and will be ready in plenty of time for the Days of '47 Rodeo debut at the venue, says Larry Mullenax, park executive director. The $17 million facility was funded by the state ($10 million), Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City ($3 million), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ($3 million) and private donors. "The new arena is a great example of how the community benefits when a public and private collaboration is formed," said Mullenax. Although it is set to be finished July 1, the arena will have its first private event June 30. The first large event is the BMW Motorcycle Owners of America's annual rally from July 13 to 16, which the organization estimates will host 6,500 BMW motorcyclists.

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  #5122  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2017, 10:30 PM
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Can someone explain to me why SLC's downtown is so short? Is it because it's next to the airport? It reminds me of San Jose but with less high rises.
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  #5123  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2017, 11:17 AM
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Excellent question, which local forum members often ask and complain about regularly as of late. This, particularly because Salt Lake City is one of a handful seemingly at or near the top of so many prestigious lists. Lists that include where to start a career, city of the future, highest quality of life, fastest growing this and that, blah, blah, etc...Salt Lake City is relatively compact as far as developable land, and total population. It has only been recently that the city proper itself has reached the 200,000 mark. However, it's vast and expanding MSA/CSA is now well over 2.5 million and climbing at a rapid clip. Much of the impressive growth of it's top of the lists job market focuses on building lavish office campuses throughout it's metro. These business parks are convenient to the many smaller adjoining cities that make up the "Wasatch Front CSA".

The close proximity of Downtown Salt Lake to its International Airport has no effect in impeding it's CBD's vertical growth. If anything, it's convenient close proximity will continue to push the growth envelope of Salt Lake City, and Downtown itself. Salt Lake City's northwestern perimeter and most of it's Northern CSA, along with it's International Airport, basically sits on the shores of the Great Salt Lake. The take off patterns of much of the departures at the Delta hub are over a vast body of water. The arrivals quietly glide in over the western reaches of the Salt Lake Valley, typically from south to north. Of course there are variations, but all of the normal would-be physical impediments are a mute point, and contained over an innocuous booming sector. That sector being either horizontal warehousing, manufacturing and distribution or an empty small portion of the Great Salt Lake body of water itself.

The good news is that the explosive growth of the Wasatch Front CSA, combined with large natural barriers of mountains and lakes is creating a definite amount of pressure on it's Capital of Salt Lake City to be more "Urban Centric." Salt Lake City proper functions as the cultural and business heart of its much larger contiguous CSA and vast Intermountain Region. Given the renewed emphasis on urban density to the regions heart, Salt Lake City itself can conceivably reach an eventual population of more than 4 or 5 hundred thousand within it's limited boundaries. This, even if it doesn't annex some of it's underdeveloped immediate neighbors, which are now also rapidly developing more density themselves.

Note: Family oriented, would be one of CSA Salt Lake City's quirks. This would probably be the number one factor that has challenged a more vertical Downtown CBD. While there is increasingly a growing single/dink/ and or empty nester affluent sector that would welcome high rise apartments, the family unit still rules the majority of the CSA population. Simply put, a typical couple with 3 to 4 or more children can still purchase a very lovely home, surrounded by a child friendly community, excellent schools and adj., out your front door, jaw dropping gorgeous scenery. All of this for a livable budget. When bread earners of a family unit have the option of a much bigger bang for their buck home in the burbs, and their home is still convenient to incredible recreation, then they're going to choose a suburban lifestyle. Developers have made it quite convenient for most families to live in a high quality of life neighborhood, and commute to a very or relatively convenient business park.

Salt Lake City has done a comparatively excellent job with it's infrastructure investment. The various modes of transportation via surface streets and mass transit to reach work throughout the greater CSA metro remain comparatively very convenient to per capita usage. One can live in one portion of the metro, yet by comparison to many of the fifty largest CSA's, conveniently commute via the many new upgraded surface streets, freeways and or parkways. Heavy emphasis has also been placed on the construction of commuter rail, and light-rail mass-transit. Impressively, much of the new business park and multi-unit residential development is now filling up alongside the considerable miles of mass transit tracks put into place over the past decade. Demand for Bus Rapid Transit is now gaining momentum and several game changing BRT projects are in various stages of planning and completion. Much of the CSA and Salt Lake City's smooother than average traffic flow is owed to its unusually wide streets. While these wide streets often present a challenge to urban walkability, the flip side is that they also are much easier to convert to multi-use. It is not unusual, even in the heart of Downtown to create multiple uses such as wider sidewalks, with ample outdoor café seating, landscaping, and water features. At the same time, it is possible to also include mass transit down the middle of the same street, with auto and even dedicated bike lanes thrown in.

Another related challenge to vertical height and street walkability, particularly in Downtown Salt Lake, is it's huge city blocks. These blocks are several times the size of most major metro downtown blocks. While this presents an ongoing challenge, it has also presented many unique opportunities with spectacular results. Dissecting and developing the interiors of these huge 10 acre blocks has given urban planners a mine field of creative opportunities. Anyone who has visited Salt Lake City's Downtown core recently, particularly the new City Creek Center, or even it's just opened follow-up of Regent St. South are awestruck by such development being possible in the historic heart of a Downtown. With the recent announcements of several upcoming large projects, one can assume that the design trend of dissecting blocks with new streets, shops, water features, and a general sense of European charm, is the fashion that will continue for the buildup of Downtown Salt Lake City.

Still, in the CSA burbs developers cannot keep up with the pace of demand for single detached homes. Time was when Utah's number one endless supply of youth was enough to keep the job supply in check. Now however, even the highest birth rate in the nation is not enough to keep up with the jobs demand. In the past, CSA Salt Lake City's high birth rate could generate an ample supply of home grown eager young professionals. Now however, Salt Lake's CSA is beginning to experience a major influx of In-Migration. Suddenly, Central Salt Lake Valley MSA is seemingly as if over night becoming majority Non-Mormon. Again, the area is very family friendly. Whether the family is Mormon or Non, it will often seek perceived suburban ideals, which are plentiful in this CSA. Realize that the majority of these burbs topography looks like the surroundings of a National Park when you step outside your door.

There is much good news however for urban geeks like ourselves. Salt Lake City Proper is experiencing mid-rise, multi-unit residential development at historic levels. Available land in the Downtown area is quickly filling up. This trend, given Salt Lake City's hemmed in boundaries, will naturally lead to increased vertical density. Thousand's of new residential units are either coming on line, are under construction, or are hitting the boards for city approval. These structures have not only rapidly increased in number, but their height has also increased over the past few seasons. Many local forum members have noted that the Downtown and City Central four story structures that were once common place two to three years ago, are now becoming six to ten floors. Major developers from the national markets such as Seattle, Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago, etc. are increasingly placing their markers on Salt Lake City's downtown investment. Provincial developers and financial institutions, who tend to be more conservative, are being joined by national and international business concerns that often have a broader investor reach and deeper pockets.

There will still continue to be a strong demand for lavish class A office space in Salt Lake's greater metro. Also, the strategic location of the Salt Lake City CSA will continue to exert major pressure on horizontal development in the manufacturing, warehousing and distribution fields. It is after all, the only major presence between Chicago, the Plains, Rockies and the West Coast, that offers same day ground distribution via rail and interstate highways. Salt Lake City is the literal geographic crossroads of the vast U.S.A. Western Region, and its surrounding major Metros. This contributes to the seemingly endless announcements of major corporations relocating and or expanding their million plus horizontal sq. ft. manufacturing and distribution headquarters to the greater Salt Lake City area.

One can argue, and many forum members often do, that the height of the buildings are not what is of paramount importance. Many will tell you that it's the infill and street presence that makes a city. That is in part very true. Where the rapid buildup of Salt Lake City has developed anew and or maintained it's historic charm, it is arguably one of the prettiest, cleanest major city centers in North America at street level. That said, the high rise residential and commercial market will continue to increase their announcements and continue to build taller. Corporate Centers such as Goldman Sachs will continue to increase their office presence downtown, and their towers will grow taller as land availability shrinks. Right now, there is a seeming dam holding a backlog of proposals for majors towers, some of which will hopefully be new tallests. Many think this dam is about to burst, given Salt Lake City's continued high flying job market. If local and national financial trends continue, then the dam will probably burst, and we'll see a sudden flurry of tower construction.

.

Last edited by delts145; Jul 5, 2017 at 9:42 AM.
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  #5124  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2017, 10:28 AM
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Downtown Update, NBA Jazz Vivint Arena


An architectural rendering of the Vivint Smart Home Arena shows the arena from 300 West.
The arena in Salt Lake City will undergo a $125 million renovation project that was announced on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016


Quote:
Originally Posted by billbillbillbill View Post

Jazz released this animation on the Vivant Remodel. I love the look of opening up the concourse similar to some NFL stadiums I have been to.

Video Link


Vivint Arena Renovations.
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Quote:
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DCRes, thanks for the Photo update. I am still impressed with the Vivint renovation. Such a large amount of work in such a short timeline.











Quote: KSL.Com ...May 8 marked the end of a playoff run for the team, it marked the beginning of a big undertaking for Okland Construction.

That's because massive work on the renovation of Vivint Smart Home Arena began the next day. Entrances were closed, bowl seats were removed and major demolition occurred.

"Sticks and bricks" — the core building materials added to the arena — represent $75 million of the $125 million renovation cost, according to Okland. They run two shifts of workers a day, one from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m., and then another evening shift from 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. The nearly round-the-clock efforts by about 400 workers per day are necessary to get the project done by the deadline: Sept. 15.

Why then? The arena's first event is a Tim McGraw and Faith Hill concert on Sept. 27, and arena management needs time to set up that event as well as make everything ready to go for the Jazz season, which will begin in October. Okland reports that the construction is on schedule.

Okland and Vivint Arena management gave reporters a tour of the construction Tuesday, six weeks into the process. And while the arena looks nothing like the finished product in the renderings, the progress already completed is impressive.

The main entrance for the arena is clearly the main focal point of the renovation. With 12,000 square feet added via a new enclosed space on the northeast corner, fans will be able to enter more quickly and easily. And once they enter, walls have been removed so they'll immediately see the court and action below. It's a cool effect, one currently on display at brand-new arenas like Brooklyn's Barclays Center or Sacramento's Golden 1 Center.

And we learned some specifics about the arena's renovation that weren't revealed during the initial renovation announcement:

- We knew that the arena seating would be reduced, but we now have an approximate idea of the new likely capacity of the arena. A source tells KSL.com to expect a seating capacity in the low 18,000s, about a 7-9 percent reduction below the 19,911 capacity for the last 25 years. Why? A few major factors: top rows of the upper bowl are being removed for the social corners and club seating, ADA seating is being increased, media is being moved to the bowl itself (rather than in temporary platforms above the tunnels), some seats are being removed to accommodate new entrances from clubs and suites in the lower bowl, and some clubs on the arena's sixth level are being removed to make way for the social corners. The final capacity has yet to be finalized.

- The renovation will add some new stairways throughout the building, allowing guests to move more easily between levels two (the new club level), three (the lower bowl concourse), four (the suite level), five (the upper bowl concourse) and six (the new "social corners" containing concourses and restrooms for upper bowl Jazz fans). The stairwells will also be fancied up a bit, with architectural changes to the look to reflect increased public usage.

- In the concourses themselves, many of the masonry walls will be covered with drywall and painted, to reduce the industrial look of the old arena. New concourse lighting will be added throughout.

- The restrooms are being refurbished in the public concourses, featuring new stone sinks, with new lighting and new fixtures. Individual restrooms have been removed from the level four suites, in favor of four restrooms meant for all suite customers. That will give more space in each individual suite.

- Rather than an entire concourse ring circling the top of the lower bowl, only two corners of the upper bowl (the two on the north side of the arena) will be available for fans with standard upper bowl seats. The two remaining corners and sidelines will remain reserved for VIP seating for now, though future renovations may convert more space on level six to public access.

- Four restaurants, one in each corner, will be the main attraction in the lower bowl concourse: R&R barbecue, Maxwell's pizza, El Chubasco's Mexican offerings, and Cubby's burgers and sandwiches. Those restaurants will feature a lot of high-table, stand-up seating to invite a more social feel. Elsewhere in the arena, Cupbop Korean, Zao Asian, Chick-Fil-A, Papa John's pizza, Iceberg shakes, Farr's Fresh ice cream and Dippin' Dots will have concession stands.

- The northwest, northeast and southwest main entries will have outdoor canopies to protect the public from weather as tickets are scanned.

- There will be a new escalator added to the east side that can take arena visitors all the way to level six.

- In March, KSL.com reported on the blue, cushioned seats that will be added throughout the arena. Those seats will be added starting next week at a rate of 300 to 400 seats per day. The old green seats went on sale to the public through Fanzz last month, though have been sold out.

- In all, 400 to 600 new TVs will be added throughout the arena, especially in the concourses.






.

Last edited by delts145; Aug 12, 2017 at 6:01 AM.
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  #5125  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2017, 4:39 PM
gillynova gillynova is offline
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Excellent question, which local forum members often ask and complain about regularly as of late. This, particularly because Salt Lake City is one of a handful seemingly at or near the top of so many prestigious lists. Lists that include where to start a career, city of the future, highest quality of life, fastest growing this and that, blah, blah, etc...Salt Lake City is relatively compact as far as developable land, and total population. It has only been recently that the city proper itself has reached the 200,000 mark. However, it's vast and expanding MSA/CSA is now well over 2.5 million and climbing at a rapid clip. Much of the impressive growth of it's top of the lists job market focuses on building lavish office campuses throughout it's metro. These business parks are convenient to the many smaller adjoining cities that make up the "Wasatch Front CSA".

The close proximity of Downtown Salt Lake to its International Airport has no effect in impeding it's CBD's vertical growth. If anything, it's convenient close proximity will continue to push the growth envelope of Salt Lake City, and Downtown itself. Salt Lake City's northwestern perimeter and most of it's Northern CSA, along with it's International Airport, basically sits on the shores of the Great Salt Lake. The take off patterns of much of the departures at the Delta hub are over a vast body of water. The arrivals quietly glide in over the western reaches of the Salt Lake Valley, typically from south to north. Of course there are variations, but all of the normal would-be physical impediments are a mute point, and contained over an innocuous booming sector. That sector being either horizontal warehousing, manufacturing and distribution or an empty small portion of the Great Salt Lake body of water itself.

The good news is that the explosive growth of the Wasatch Front CSA, combined with large natural barriers of mountains and lakes is creating a definite amount of pressure on it's Capital of Salt Lake City to be more "Urban Centric." Salt Lake City proper functions as the cultural and business heart of its much larger contiguous CSA and vast Intermountain Region. Given the renewed emphasis on urban density to the regions heart, Salt Lake City itself can conceivably reach an eventual population of more than 4 or 5 hundred thousand within it's limited boundaries. This, even if it doesn't annex some of it's underdeveloped immediate neighbors, which are now also rapidly developing more density themselves.

Note: Family oriented, would be one of CSA Salt Lake City's quirks. This would probably be the number one factor that has challenged a more vertical Downtown CBD. While there is increasingly a growing single/dink/ and or empty nester affluent sector that would welcome high rise apartments, the family unit still rules the majority of the CSA population. Simply put, a typical couple with 3 to 4 or more children can still purchase a very lovely home, surrounded by a child friendly community, excellent schools and adj., out your front door, jaw dropping gorgeous scenery. All of this for a livable budget. When bread earners of a family unit have the option of a much bigger bang for their buck home in the burbs, and their home is still convenient to incredible recreation, then they're going to choose a suburban lifestyle. Developers have made it quite convenient for most families to live in a high quality of life neighborhood, and commute to a very or relatively convenient business park.

Salt Lake City has done a comparatively excellent job with it's infrastructure investment. The various modes of transportation via surface streets and mass transit to reach work throughout the greater CSA metro remain comparatively very convenient to per capita usage. One can live in one portion of the metro, yet by comparison to many of the fifty largest CSA's, conveniently commute via the many new upgraded surface streets, freeways and or parkways. Heavy emphasis has also been placed on the construction of commuter rail, and light-rail mass-transit. Impressively, much of the new business park and multi-unit residential development is now filling up alongside the considerable miles of mass transit tracks put into place over the past decade. Demand for Bus Rapid Transit is now gaining momentum and several game changing BRT projects are in various stages of planning and completion. Much of the CSA and Salt Lake City's smooother than average traffic flow is owed to its unusually wide streets. While these wide streets often present a challenge to urban walkability, the flip side is that they also are much easier to convert to multi-use. It is not unusual, even in the heart of Downtown to create multiple uses such as wider sidewalks, with ample outdoor café seating, landscaping, and water features. At the same time, it is possible to also include mass transit down the middle of the same street, with auto and even dedicated bike lanes thrown in.

Another related challenge to vertical height and street walkability, particularly in Downtown Salt Lake, is it's huge city blocks. These blocks are several times the size of most major metro downtown blocks. While this presents an ongoing challenge, it has also presented many unique opportunities with spectacular results. Dissecting and developing the interiors of these huge 10 acre blocks has given urban planners a mine field of creative opportunities. Anyone who has visited Salt Lake City's Downtown core recently, particularly the new City Creek Center, or even it's just opened follow-up of Regent St. South are awestruck by such development being possible in the historic heart of a Downtown. With the recent announcements of several upcoming large projects, one can assume that the design trend of dissecting blocks with new streets, shops, water features, and a general sense of European charm, is the fashion that will continue for the buildup of Downtown Salt Lake City.

Still, in the CSA burbs developers cannot keep up with the pace of demand for single detached homes. Time was when Utah's number one endless supply of youth was enough to keep the job supply in check. Now however, even the highest birth rate in the nation is not enough to keep up with the jobs demand. In the past, CSA Salt Lake City's high birth rate could generate an ample supply of home grown eager young professionals. Now however, Salt Lake's CSA is beginning to experience a major influx of In-Migration. Suddenly, Central Salt Lake Valley MSA is seemingly as if over night becoming majority Non-Mormon. Again, the area is very family friendly. Whether the family is Mormon or Non, it will often seek perceived suburban ideals, which are plentiful in this CSA. Realize that the majority of these burbs topography looks like the surroundings of a National Park when you step outside your door.

There is much good news however for urban geeks like ourselves. Salt Lake City Proper is experiencing mid-rise, multi-unit residential development at historic levels. Available land in the Downtown area is quickly filling up. This trend, given Salt Lake City's hemmed in boundaries, will naturally lead to increased vertical density. Thousand's of new residential units are either coming on line, are under construction, or are hitting the boards for city approval. These structures have not only rapidly increased in number, but their height has also increased over the past few seasons. Many local forum members have noted that the Downtown and City Central four story structures that were once common place two to three years ago, are now becoming six to ten floors. Major developers from the national markets such as Seattle, Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago, etc. are increasingly placing their markers on Salt Lake City's downtown investment. Provincial developers and financial institutions, who tend to be more conservative, are being joined by national and international business concerns that often have a broader investor reach and deeper pockets.

There will still continue to be a strong demand for lavish class A office space in Salt Lake's greater metro. Also, the strategic location of the Salt Lake City CSA will continue to exert major pressure on horizontal development in the manufacturing, warehousing and distribution fields. It is after all, the only major presence between Chicago, the Plains, Rockies and the West Coast, that offers same day ground distribution via rail and interstate highways. Salt Lake City is the literal geographic crossroads of the vast U.S.A. Western Region, and its surrounding major Metros. This contributes to the seemingly endless announcements of major corporations relocating and or expanding their million plus horizontal sq. ft. manufacturing and distribution headquarters to the greater Salt Lake City area.

One can argue, and many forum members often do, that the height of the buildings are not what is of paramount importance. Many will tell you that it's the infill and street presence that makes a city. That is in part very true. Where the rapid buildup of Salt Lake City has developed anew and or maintained it's historic charm, it is arguably one of the prettiest, cleanest major city centers in North America at street level. That said, the high rise residential and commercial market will continue to increase their announcements and continue to build taller. Corporate Centers such as Goldman Sachs will continue to increase their office presence downtown, and their towers will grow taller as land availability shrinks. Right now, there is a seeming dam holding a backlog of proposals for majors towers, some of which will hopefully be new tallests. Many think this dam is about to burst, given Salt Lake City's continued high flying job market. If local and national financial trends continue, then the dam will probably burst, and we'll see a sudden flurry of tower construction.

.
Thanks for the informative information about SLC! It really explains a lot on what's going on over there. I'm planning to fly over to SLC in December as my best friend is graduating from the University of Utah this fall. I can't wait to explore the city and hopefully go to a Jazz game!
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  #5126  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 10:07 AM
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Your very welcome Gellynova. When it gets closer to your visit, be sure and drop me a post. December is a fantastic month to visit Salt Lake City. Of course, you'll be sure to visit at least a couple of the major ski resorts, particularly the Park City area, also perhaps Snowbird. The resorts are very convenient and close for day trips. It's like visiting San Diego or Miami, and taking a day trip to the beach, but mountain resorts instead. Even if you don't ski, you'll have a fantastic time in Park City. Also, Downtown Salt Lake is one of America's prettiest Christmas cities. You'll particularly want to catch the lights at Temple Square. Of course, as an urban geek, you'll also cross the street and visit the new City Creek Center. It will blow your mind.

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  #5127  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 10:18 AM
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Downtown Update - AC Marriott Hotel & Adj. Millagro Apartments


Renderings of completed project



Rendering of the AC Hotel and Peg Apartment development as designed by FFKR Architects. Image courtesy Salt Lake Planning Division.


Rendering of the PEG apartment development as designed by FFKR Architects. Image courtesy Salt Lake Planning Division.


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Last edited by delts145; Sep 19, 2017 at 10:29 AM.
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  #5128  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 10:34 AM
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Downtown Update - Marriott Towneplace Suites - Site Prep




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Last edited by delts145; Jul 7, 2017 at 10:46 AM.
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  #5129  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 10:40 AM
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Downtown Adj. Update - North Temple Flats



https://images1.apartments.com

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Last edited by delts145; Jul 7, 2017 at 10:50 AM.
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  #5130  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 11:16 AM
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Downtown Update - Marmalade District - Toasted Barrel Brewery


Opening Summer 2017! Toasted Barrel Brewery

Toasted Barrel is located at 412 West 600 North, Salt Lake City, we are located right off I-15 600 N exit for easy access to great beer.

​Toasted Barrel Brewery, bringing Utah the great beer WE deserve. Our motto is to combine the craftsmanship of brewing with the passion of a fine winery. We specialize in barrel aging, sours, mixed fermentation and spontaneous beers. We are two dudes that like to brew

See the progress of the build out here! https://www.toastedbarrelbrewery.com/the_brewery

No matter what your favorite brew is, we have something that will make you happy!


Sage Dawson, Lynn Litchfield with Toasted Barrel Coming Soon Banner


www.toastedbarrelbrewery.com


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Salt Lake Update, Central South

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liberty Wellsian View Post

I noticed this on State St. last week

Pic By Liberty Wellsian

.

Last edited by delts145; Jul 7, 2017 at 11:57 AM.
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Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 11:44 AM
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Update, Central South - O.C. Tanner Headquarters Remodel


I'm glad you guys brought it up. I hadn't paid any attention to it since the remodel. It turned out quite nice, especially the masonry,
which apparently has won some awards.


http://big-d.com


http://big-d.com


http://www.utahmasonrycouncil.org


http://wondoor.com


http://www.utahmasonrycouncil.org


http://www.utahmasonrycouncil.org
.

Last edited by delts145; Jul 7, 2017 at 11:56 AM.
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  #5132  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2017, 11:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
Excellent question, which local forum members often ask and complain about regularly as of late. This, particularly because Salt Lake City is one of a handful seemingly at or near the top of so many prestigious lists. Lists that include where to start a career, city of the future, highest quality of life, fastest growing this and that, blah, blah, etc...Salt Lake City is relatively compact as far as developable land, and total population. It has only been recently that the city proper itself has reached the 200,000 mark. However, it's vast and expanding MSA/CSA is now well over 2.5 million and climbing at a rapid clip. Much of the impressive growth of it's top of the lists job market focuses on building lavish office campuses throughout it's metro. These business parks are convenient to the many smaller adjoining cities that make up the "Wasatch Front CSA".......
.
Great explanation about SLC's future growth in the commercial and residential sector driven by the affordable and high quality living standards available in the SLC area.

I have always wondered why you don't move to SLC given your passion (and obsession) for the city? It's obviously way, way cheaper to live in SLC than LA, so money can't be the issue!
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Old Posted Jul 10, 2017, 11:00 AM
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Haha, Well, There's only so much time in the day to spend posting on this forum. Usually, I post very early in the morning, as that's pretty much my best unencumbered time.

I have family along the Wasatch Front CSA, and spent many of my formative years there, so you could say I am an Expatriate of sorts. I wish I had more time to post on any of the Los Angeles, French or Italian forums. I am a Parisian by birth, have spent a lot of time in Europe, have an extended Italian family, and have also lived in Italy for several years

Development is a hobby that is rapidly becoming a second career, so I enjoy spending what hobby time I have toward it. While I very much enjoy living in Los Angeles, I don't plan on owning or developing any property here other than a private residence. I will be developing properties in and around the Salt Lake area, so I do interest myself on that regions progress in general.

I am heavily involved in the entertainment industry as a career, hence the reason to live in Los Angeles . It helps that I also love living in Southern California. In the near future, I do hope to be able to divide my residence time more between Park City, Utah and less the Los Angeles area.

Last edited by delts145; Jul 10, 2017 at 5:01 PM.
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  #5134  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2017, 9:55 AM
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Downtown Adj. - Central 9th District - Alinea Lofts


Isaac Riddle Reports - Full Article @ http://www.buildingsaltlake.com/cons...central-ninth/

...The large green warehouse-style building that for years was the home of Local First, a nonprofit that advocates for local businesses, has been demolished to make way for the Alinéa Lofts, a mixed-use development by LandForge Inc.

The three-story development, located at the northeast corner of the 900 South and 200 West intersection, will consist of 24 residential units and eight ground floor retail spaces. The project will have for-sale residential units above the ground floor commercial fronting 900 South and for-sale townhomes running perpendicular to the main building. The residential units will be a mix of two and three-bedrooms.



Updated rendering of the Alinéa Lofts. Image courtesy LandForge Inc.



Aerial rendering of the west face of the Alinea Lofts on 200 West. Image courtesy LandForge Inc. http://www.buildingsaltlake.com/cons...linea-lofts-2/


Demolition crews work at the site of the future Alinéa Lofts as seen from 900 South. Photo by Isaac Riddle.

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Last edited by delts145; Jul 11, 2017 at 10:07 AM.
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  #5135  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2017, 10:17 AM
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Downtown Update - Hardware Village


Mike Gorrell for the Salt Lake Tribune

A development just north of SLC’s downtown is betting on Hardware http://www.sltrib.com/home/5454142-1...-north-of-slcs

A couple of dozen construction workers hustled about Wednesday in the subterranean foundation for the next building being erected in the face-lift of 400 West north of North Temple.

They're laying the groundwork for what will be part of Hardware District, a $275 million mixed-use project that SALT Development is building on the west side of 400 West between 200 North and North Temple (around the historic Salt Lake Hardware Building).

The just-emerging seven-story building, along with another seven-story structure directly to the west, which is much farther along, will contain 466 residential units — from one- and two-bedroom units to much larger brownstones on the ground level.

To the south will be two office buildings. One will be a 10-story tower, with seven floors of offices (200,00 square feet) on top of three levels of parking (800 stalls).

The second is projected to be four stories, made of heavy timber and glass to establish a creative ambiance throughout its 60,000 square feet of space.
...
"Hardware District is the perfect complement to 4th West Apartments," he said, "as it provides a sense of community with first-class living" and amenities such as barbecue pits, a pool, spas, a fitness center and a library lounge with a bar and a two-story waterfall.

The first Hardware District residential units are expected to hit the market in February. The opening of Hardware West is scheduled to introduce 48 studio apartments, 134 one-bedroom units and 83 two-bedroom units.

"The ground floor will have 37 two-story brownstone town homes averaging 1,400 square feet," Vegh said. The five brownstones in Hardware East will be about 1,500 square feet, he added, noting that most units in both buildings will have 10-foot ceilings.

They are scheduled to open in August 2018.



















Issac Riddle Reports - Construction Reaches The Halfway Mark - http://www.buildingsaltlake.com/firs...-halfway-mark/


Source: BuildingSaltLake.com


Source: BuildingSaltLake.com


http://www.buildingsaltlake.com/firs...-halfway-mark/


Construction is underway on the Hardware East building. Photo by Isaac Riddle.

Construction Update Pics from the Salt Lake Tribune:

http://www.sltrib.com

http://www.sltrib.com

http://www.sltrib.com

http://www.sltrib.com

http://www.sltrib.com
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Old Posted Jul 11, 2017, 10:43 AM
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Amazon Announces Major Distribution Center

Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
There will still continue to be a strong demand for lavish class A office space in Salt Lake's greater metro. Also, the strategic location of the Salt Lake City CSA will continue to exert major pressure on horizontal development in the manufacturing, warehousing and distribution fields. It is after all, the only major presence between Chicago, the Plains, Rockies and the West Coast, that offers same day ground distribution via rail and interstate highways. Salt Lake City is the literal geographic crossroads of the vast U.S.A. Western Region, and its surrounding major Metros. This contributes to the seemingly endless announcements of major corporations relocating and or expanding their million plus horizontal sq. ft. manufacturing and distribution headquarters to the greater Salt Lake City area.
Isaac Riddle Reports - Full Article @ http://www.buildingsaltlake.com/amaz...bution-center/

...Amazon officially announced that the Seattle-based retail company will build a $250-million regional fulfillment center in Salt Lake City’s Northwest Quadrant, bringing with it at least 1,500 full-time well-paying jobs, with the possibility of thousands more in seasonal positions...

...In addition to Amazon’s project, shipping company, UPS broke ground in February on an 840,000-square foot regional distribution center on the City’s northwest side, adjacent to the Northwest Quadrant boundary. In December,

Last year, POST Consumer Brands, the nation’s third-largest cereal company, began construction on a 901,000 square foot facility on California Avenue and 5600 West...



Map of the Northwest Quadrant. The site of the proposed Amazon fulfillment center is highlighted in red. Image courtesy Salt Lake City.

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Last edited by delts145; Jul 11, 2017 at 11:21 AM.
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Old Posted Jul 13, 2017, 10:29 AM
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Downtown Update - Centro Civico Project


Isaac Riddle Reports - Full Article @ http://www.buildingsaltlake.com/coun...centro-civico/

...Centro Civico is a six-story, 61-unit residential building, 43 of which will be reserved for low-income seniors. The project, called John Florez Manor, will have a unit mix of studio, one and two bedroom apartments. The affordable housing units will be reserved for residents earning between 25 and 50 percent Area Median Income (AMI). Rents for the affordable units will range between $285 and $784, depending on the AMI and size of the unit.

The project will replace a vacant 0.38-acre parcel, currently used as overflow parking, on Centro Civico’s campus on the 100 South block of 600 West. The 60,000 square foot building will include a ground-floor parking structure with 23 surface stalls. Centro Civico planned the development to be transit oriented, being less than a block away from the Greektown TRAX station. The project will have a low parking ratio, with about one parking stall for every three units.

Centro Civico plans the residential building to be the first of two phases. The second phase will be the redevelopment of the organization’s civic center. The new campus will include retail space, classrooms, a black-box theater, museum, art gallery, a plaza, office space and an athletic complex...



The west face of John Florez Manor senior housing. Image courtesy Salt Lake City planning documents.

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Old Posted Jul 16, 2017, 11:12 AM
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Pic By EPDesign
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Old Posted Jul 16, 2017, 11:16 AM
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Salt Lake City & MSA/CSA Rundown



Software giant Adobe expanding its Salt Lake Metro Campus, to build new facility, double Utah workforce

Art Raymond - Deseret News http://www.deseretnews.com/article/8...workforce.html

Salt LAKE CITY — Software giant Adobe Inc. will substantially expand its Utah presence, announcing plans Thursday to build
a new $90 million facility and add almost 1,300 employees at its Lehi campus...

..The new project will complement the four-story, 280,000-square-foot building the company completed in 2012 for $107 million. The original facility, designed by San Francisco architecture firm WRNS Studio and perched on a hill just east of I-15 near Thanksgiving Point, hosts about 1,200 employees from Adobe’s digital marketing unit...





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Last edited by delts145; Aug 17, 2017 at 6:40 PM.
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Old Posted Jul 25, 2017, 11:11 AM
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Downtown - Updated Vivint Smart Home Arena nearing September completion


Isaac Riddle Reports - Full Article @ http://www.buildingsaltlake.com/upda...er-completion/

...The $125 million redevelopment and expansion includes a top-to-bottom renovation as the arena’s owners, the Larry H. Miller family, work to upgrade one of the nation’s oldest NBA arenas for the technology era.
“Vivint Smart Home Arena is the story of an arena rising to meet the expectations of its guests as a top destination for sports and entertainment events,” said arena President Jim Olson in a statement. “The arena renovation will be packed with amenities to create a world-class experience for our fans. There will be a new energy around the building.”

The renovations include a new high-capacity wireless network, full array of solar panels on the roof, redesigned lower and upper bowl concourses, redesigned locker rooms, an expanded main entrance, a new indoor lobby, open gathering places on level six, new restaurants and upgraded clubs/suites...



Aerial rendering Vivint Smart Home Arena.

Rendering of the expanded lobby...The updated arena will include over 30 restaurants and food vendors... In addition to expanded dining options,
the renovated arena will include new craft beer stations and snacks, featuring the offerings of local brew pubs and microbreweries.



View of the court from the new suites. Photo by Isaac Riddle.


New restaurant space under construction in the Vivint Smart Home Arena. Photo by Isaac Riddle.

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Last edited by delts145; Aug 11, 2017 at 9:20 PM.
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