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  #42481  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 8:09 AM
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Compton's Eagle Tree

I was leafing through a book today and learned about this tree for the first time. The Eagle Tree, a sycamore, was used
as a landmark in surveying the boundary of Rancho San Pedro in 1857. Here is a 1952 photo of the Eagle Tree, which got
its name because eagles nested in it:



Cal State Dominguez Hills Digital Collections


In the mid-1940s oil pipelines threatened the tree, but due to its history, it was preserved and marked with a plaque
in 1947 (I looked at a 1943 map of Compton, and I didn't see an Electric Avenue, so I think that reference below is
an error):



April 17, 1947, Los Angeles Times @ ProQuest via LAPL


In 1954, a local oldtimer recalled the tree from the days of his youth:






Here is Mr. Gaines, who lived until 1962, posing next to the 1947 plaque. There is a Wesley Gaines Elementary School
in Paramount that may be named for him (his dad had the same name):



October 17, 1954, Los Angeles Times @ ProQuest via LAPL


Since then, the Eagle Tree has not been entirely forgotten. It was the subject of a November 15, 1987, Los Angeles Times
article, the Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum's website has a page on the tree, and Nathan Masters has mentioned it.


I wanted to see what the tree looked like now. This is the tree, at Poppy and Short in Compton, on the September 2014 GSV:




Here's the Bing Streetside view from February 15, 2015:




And, finally -- perhaps in more ways than one -- the Eagle Tree on the most current GSV, July 2015:




It's like El Aliso all over again!
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  #42482  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 8:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rustifer View Post
For those of you who are into 77 Sunset Strip re-runs and get MeTV on cable, an episode titled "Reserved For Mr. Bailey" is coming up next week. It is one of 30 episodes that never made it into the syndication loop, so it hasn't been seen in probably 50 years. Efrem Zimbalist Jr. (Stu Bailey) is the only actor in the episode, and is stuck in a creepy ghost town with some unseen killer trying to murder him.

I remember seeing it when it first aired in 1961 and only remember bits and pieces of the story. I'm going to DVR that puppy, then settle in with a couple of martinis at just the right time, you betcha.
I've been DVRing the show for over a month now off-air. My wife and I have been enjoying them greatly, and slowly I'm remembering details of the show, mostly Kookie's gags, from when I watched the show with my family as a very young boy. I am now completely hooked.

Looking forward to watching the Stu solo episode.
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  #42483  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 1:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
Here are a couple of pictures of Jerry's Joynt. I think we must be looking at the rear.


USC Digital Library

This shot, with Jerry's Joynt on the left, shows the building from e_r's photo.


USC Digital Library
I bet they served pressed duck in Jerry's Joynt. In fact, I'm pretty sure these two guys standing outside are discussing how good the duck was, not to mention the egg rolls and won ton soup. Probably got all three for under a $1 back then...
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  #42484  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 5:11 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Liked revisiting Jerry's Joynt this morning! Would have loved to have gone there and met Anna May Wong!

Harry Quillen Collection/LAPL

Caption: Motion picture actress Anna May Wong at the Chew Yuen Grocery Store, before it became a gift shop.
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  #42485  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 5:24 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hossc View Post
They're from "job 2531: Victor gruen associates, world savings banks institute (lynwood, calif.), 1958".



both from getty research institute

here's a vintage picture from lynwood by ilu johnson and chris diaz. There's no date, but the cars suggest to me that it's probably mid- to late-60s.

books.google.com
_________________________________________________________________

Liked the World Savings photos. Anyone know what the "4" might mean in the lighted box on the sign. In the b&w image (not included here) it's not as legible, but I believe it's a "2" in that one. In the "book" photo it appears this might be a clock. Perhaps?

Also, in the book photo above, I have always heard of "Chicken Delight", because comedians and variety shows would make jokes about that name. I feel that I came to believe it was something made up, because I never saw one before, but there's one in the photo!
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  #42486  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 5:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post

Anyone know what the "4" might mean in the lighted box on the sign. In the b&w image (not included here) it's not as legible, but I believe it's a "2" in that one. In the "book" photo it appears this might be a clock. Perhaps?
Adjusting the contrast, it's 4 in the black & white shot too. With the levels of the color image tweaked, I think it's the interest rate - 4%.
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  #42487  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 7:00 PM
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Here's a familiar location, but I don't think we've seen Julius Shulman photos of it before. It's "Job 030: Burton Schutt, Carl's-at-the-Sea (Santa Monica, Calif.), 1947".



Despite the description, I think the sign above actually says Carl's-At-The-Beach.



This last shot probably gives us the best view of the motor apartments.



All from Getty Research Institute
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  #42488  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 7:07 PM
Slauson Slim Slauson Slim is offline
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Anna May Wong born and raised in LA, third generation Californian.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
Liked revisiting Jerry's Joynt this morning! Would have loved to have gone there and met Anna May Wong!

Harry Quillen Collection/LAPL

Caption: Motion picture actress Anna May Wong at the Chew Yuen Grocery Store, before it became a gift shop.
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  #42489  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 7:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post




Adjusting the contrast, it's 4 in the black & white shot too. With the levels of the color image tweaked, I think it's the interest rate - 4%.
HossC, I believe you are correct. There was a time when banks advertised the current passbook interest rate. Today, with rates at less than one percent it makes no sense to do so.

Cheers,
Jack
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  #42490  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 8:00 PM
ScottyB ScottyB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post

And, finally -- perhaps in more ways than one -- the Eagle Tree on the most current GSV, July 2015:




It's like El Aliso all over again!
Tough to watch historic trees succumb to age and elements, which they (and we) inevitably do. Sadly, it would seem we are going to be prematurely losing many of our trees, native and otherwise, to pests/drought. I am nurturing my sycamore as best I can, but there is apparently nothing to be done about the polyphagous shot borer beetle. Here is a recent article for those interested. It's not a pretty picture.
LA Times
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  #42491  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 8:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottyB View Post
Tough to watch historic trees succumb to age and elements, which they (and we) inevitably do. Sadly, it would seem we are going to be prematurely losing many of our trees, native and otherwise, to pests/drought. I am nurturing my sycamore as best I can, but there is apparently nothing to be done about the polyphagous shot borer beetle. Here is a recent article for those interested. It's not a pretty picture.
LA Times
Seems like the solution is to find trees that are resistant to pests...and grow well in a place like Southern California.
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  #42492  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2017, 11:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
I was leafing through a book today and learned about this tree for the first time. The Eagle Tree, a sycamore, was used
as a landmark in surveying the boundary of Rancho San Pedro in 1857. Here is a 1952 photo of the Eagle Tree, which got
its name because eagles nested in it:



Cal State Dominguez Hills Digital Collections


In the mid-1940s oil pipelines threatened the tree, but due to its history, it was preserved and marked with a plaque
in 1947 (I looked at a 1943 map of Compton, and I didn't see an Electric Avenue, so I think that reference below is
an error):



April 17, 1947, Los Angeles Times @ ProQuest via LAPL


In 1954, a local oldtimer recalled the tree from the days of his youth:






Here is Mr. Gaines, who lived until 1962, posing next to the 1947 plaque. There is a Wesley Gaines Elementary School
in Paramount that may be named for him (his dad had the same name):



October 17, 1954, Los Angeles Times @ ProQuest via LAPL


Since then, the Eagle Tree has not been entirely forgotten. It was the subject of a November 15, 1987, Los Angeles Times
article, the Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum's website has a page on the tree, and Nathan Masters has mentioned it.


I wanted to see what the tree looked like now. This is the tree, at Poppy and Short in Compton, on the September 2014 GSV:




Here's the Bing Streetside view from February 15, 2015:




And, finally -- perhaps in more ways than one -- the Eagle Tree on the most current GSV, July 2015:




It's like El Aliso all over again!
Someone competent at propagating Sycamores should take cuttings and preserve the tree (via pieces of it)!

It would have been the "only tree" likely because of the several floods (1815, 1825, 1833, 1838-1839, 1848, 1858, 1859, 1860, winter 1861-1862) which probably carried away the other old ones around. For the 1838-1839 one, Michael White, whose house was where Compton was to be, wrote “The water was in the house waist deep for 6 weeks.”

Edit: Not sure why it was used for surveying purposes in 1857. There was a lawsuit in 1855, hearing of which lasting 11 days, outcome favorable to defendant Manuel Dominguez; then in 1862, partition was looming; but I don't know what was up in 1857 (Rancho San Pedro was "laid out" long before that).

Last edited by odinthor; Jun 19, 2017 at 11:27 PM. Reason: Dubiety about 1857.
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  #42493  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 1:21 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
It's like El Aliso all over again!

Well, not quite. The Eagle Tree is reportedly to be about 200 years older than El Aliso was when it was killed off (I'm sure they'll count the rings when the time comes.) If the Eagle Tree had been centered in a park it may have had a chance.

The Arcade Palm is still looking good (as of January anyway).
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  #42494  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 3:56 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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FW, the Eagle Tree reminded me of the 121 year old tree that still survives at Disneyland.

It's a Canary Island Date Palm that was planted in 1896 on the Dominguez family farm. (the tree was a wedding gift)
Since this one tree in particular held special meaning to the Dominguez family, Walt promised never to take it down.
That promise swayed the family to sell their land to Disney.

The original property contained citrus groves, the house, and some mature trees. The house was moved and became construction offices
and the mature trees were integrated into the park. (one being the Canary Island Date Palm)



Here's how the Canary palm looks today. (I guess the other mature trees died [])


http://samlanddisney.blogspot.com/20...dominguez.html

To find the Dominguez Palm walk to the Indiana Jones Fast-pass entrance and look for the fat tall tree trunk
that punches through the edge of the roof of the Jungle Cruise boathouse.




The Canary Island Date Palm in 1957.


www.disneybymark.com





Info from:
http://samlanddisney.blogspot.com/20...dominguez.html

http://www.disneybymark.com/retro-disneyland-3/

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jun 20, 2017 at 5:39 AM.
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  #42495  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 4:39 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Have we visited the 90-90 Club on NLA?

9090 W. Washington Blvd.

Culver City, California


https://picclick.com/Rare-Vintage-WW...l#&gid=1&pid=2






https://picclick.com/Rare-Vintage-WW...l#&gid=1&pid=3

Cocktail Menu from the night of April 11, 1942

M.B., Sammy, Stan, Eleanor, Sid, Jerry, Al, & Marge

(2nd night of going steady)



close-up: so you can read the writing

detail
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  #42496  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 4:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
FW, the Eagle Tree reminded me of the 121 year old tree that still survives at Disneyland.

It's a Canary Island Date Palm that was planted in 1896 on the Dominguez family farm. (the tree was a wedding gift)
Since this one tree in particular held special meaning to the Dominguez family, Walt promised never to take it down.
That promise swayed the family to sell their land to Disney.

The original property contained citrus groves, the house, and some mature trees. The house was moved and became construction offices
and the mature trees were integrated into the park. (one being the Canary Island Date Palm)



Here's how the Canary palm looks today. (I guess the other mature trees died [])


http://samlanddisney.blogspot.com/20...dominguez.html

To find the Dominguez Palm walk to the Indiana Jones Fast-pass entrance and look for the fat tall tree trunk
that punches through the edge of the roof of the Jungle Cruise boathouse.




The Canary Island Date Palm in 1957.


www.disneybymark.com





Thanks:
samlanddisney.blogspot.com

www.disneybymark.com
cough cough psst, e_r, Pollorena cough cough . . .
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  #42497  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 5:08 AM
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Oh man, so it isn't a Canary Island Date Palm odinthor? (I should have checked with you first)
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jun 20, 2017 at 5:41 AM.
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  #42498  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 5:21 AM
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
So I pointed out the wrong tree in the 1957 b/w? I should have asked first-
The tree is right, and going by the couple of articles I'm seeing when I Google, to my surprise Dominguez is sure what they say; but several years ago, I ran across data on the Pollorena family--the old So Cal Pollorenas--one branch of which ended up in Anaheim, and it included information on where the Pollorena in question's house was, as well as the info about the tree vis-à-vis Disneyland. It could be that the Pollorena scion married a Dominguez, hence the confusion. So maybe I should hold my prompting about Pollorena in reserve until I find the source of that data again. Methinks it was in a local newspaper story or self-published family history . . .
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  #42499  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 5:32 AM
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When you mentioned pollerina, I thought you were referring to a type of tree. lol.
__
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  #42500  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 5:53 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Here's an interesting slide I saw on ebay a few days ago.

It shows the Tara set from 'Gone With The Wind' at Selznick International in Culver City. [date of the slide is unknown]


http://www.ebay.com/itm/1940-red-bor...cAAOSw~y9ZBOyg


I was intrigued by the buildings (and watertower) in the distance, as well as that little green shed on the far right.

Is that a blade sign or topiary near that large yellow building? (whatever it is it's shaped like a giant penis)




For reference, here's an old map of the lot that shows the location of the Tara set.


http://www.retroweb.com/40acres_gwtw.html

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jun 21, 2017 at 1:41 AM.
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