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  #9241  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2018, 7:33 PM
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Zapatan Zapatan is offline
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Originally Posted by mcgrath618 View Post
Um... Schuylkill Yards tower? That's an actual proposed development over 1,000 ft tall right now.
For someone who posts in the Philly section of SSP you really have a negative attitude towards Philly.
I think there is a potential 1095' building and a 1200' building for that development.
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  #9242  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2018, 8:31 PM
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I think there is a potential 1095' building and a 1200' building for that development.
Tallest building in Schuylkill Yards is indeed expected to reach around 1,095 feet tall. The tallest building in the 30th Street District Master plan is about 1,200 feet tall. However, the 30th Street plan is likely a ways off. 15-20 years or so. None of this will be built until Schuylkill Yards is built out.
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  #9243  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2018, 8:35 PM
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Zapatan Zapatan is offline
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Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
Tallest building in Schuylkill Yards is indeed expected to reach around 1,095 feet tall. The tallest building in the 30th Street District Master plan is about 1,200 feet tall. However, the 30th Street plan is likely a ways off. 15-20 years or so. None of this will be built until Schuylkill Yards is built out.
Right, it is the 30th street plan.

Although 1095 in Philly will be nice to hold us over
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  #9244  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2018, 12:03 AM
Tatts Tatts is offline
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Originally Posted by mcgrath618 View Post
Um... Schuylkill Yards tower? That's an actual proposed development over 1,000 ft tall right now.
For someone who posts in the Philly section of SSP you really have a negative attitude towards Philly.
Um...I could propose a 3,000 ft tall tower right for Point Breeze--the next Burj Khalifa--and it would be no less a pipe dream than any building in that Schuylkill Yards project.
For someone who posts in the Philly section of SSP, you really don't understand the difference between an artist's conception and a concrete plan.
None of those buildings is anything more than a developer's tortured fantasy. There's nobody ready to pay for them, nobody ready to move in to them, no detailed plans, no contracts. Nobody is going to build a supertall skyscraper (or a 20-story box) unless they have somebody ready to move in and pay for it.
There is no market for those buildings; and until Amazon moves here (or some other huge company), there won't be. That land will stay low-rise for decades.
I wish that were not the case, and I think Schuylkill Yards is a far, far better fit to Amazon's RFP than Long Island or Virginia. But without them, the plans for SY aren't worth the computer monitors they're displayed on.
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  #9245  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2018, 12:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Tatts View Post
Um...I could propose a 3,000 ft tall tower right for Point Breeze--the next Burj Khalifa--and it would be no less a pipe dream than any building in that Schuylkill Yards project.
For someone who posts in the Philly section of SSP, you really don't understand the difference between an artist's conception and a concrete plan.
None of those buildings is anything more than a developer's tortured fantasy. There's nobody ready to pay for them, nobody ready to move in to them, no detailed plans, no contracts. Nobody is going to build a supertall skyscraper (or a 20-story box) unless they have somebody ready to move in and pay for it.
There is no market for those buildings; and until Amazon moves here (or some other huge company), there won't be. That land will stay low-rise for decades.
I wish that were not the case, and I think Schuylkill Yards is a far, far better fit to Amazon's RFP than Long Island or Virginia. But without them, the plans for SY aren't worth the computer monitors they're displayed on.


And since Amazon already knows where its future lyes .... ( did I spell that right ? ) ..... and the chance of some other blue
chip mega business moving here is a bit of a stretch ..... don't count on any new extended skyline any time soon .
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  #9246  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2018, 4:58 AM
Inquizative Inquizative is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatts View Post
Um...I could propose a 3,000 ft tall tower right for Point Breeze--the next Burj Khalifa--and it would be no less a pipe dream than any building in that Schuylkill Yards project.
For someone who posts in the Philly section of SSP, you really don't understand the difference between an artist's conception and a concrete plan.
None of those buildings is anything more than a developer's tortured fantasy. There's nobody ready to pay for them, nobody ready to move in to them, no detailed plans, no contracts. Nobody is going to build a supertall skyscraper (or a 20-story box) unless they have somebody ready to move in and pay for it.
There is no market for those buildings; and until Amazon moves here (or some other huge company), there won't be. That land will stay low-rise for decades.
I wish that were not the case, and I think Schuylkill Yards is a far, far better fit to Amazon's RFP than Long Island or Virginia. But without them, the plans for SY aren't worth the computer monitors they're displayed on.
Philly is going to have to cultivate it's next big corporation. Seattle lucked up with a progressive Bezos and created Amazon. We lucked up with Comcast which started out as a local cable company that had the expertise and drive and grew into now the multinational corporation that it is today. We'll never be able to compete with the likes of NYC or D.C. for reasons there's no need to explain. The good thing is Philadelphia had everything Amazon asked for in spades but again, we cannot compete with the big boys immediately north and south of us. Whatever Philly did to keep Comcast should be a similar formula used to create more. We have major universities, culture, infrastructure, one of the largest populations ranked 5 or 6. We have mass transit, which needs to increase it's heavy rail subway system up and down Roosevelt Blvd, instead of buying new fleets busses (which just adds traffic to our narrow streets) every 6 or 7 years. NYC still runs busses that are almost 40 years old. They invest in subway rail, Philly needs to do the same if they want to move up.

It seems many here want a larger skyline for aesthetic purposes, but your skyline reflects the economy of the city and Philly has a fabulous skyline but we keep looking up at that overpriced, overcrowded city called NYC, where the average citizen struggles to pay rent or living in public housing with rent control. New York City literally has too many skyscrapers it's hard to define it's character or aesthetic identity. The developers must have the zoning board in their back pocket to the point their building super skinny skyscrapers not because they want to but because they have to, there isn't any space! They look like a good wind will topple them.
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  #9247  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2018, 2:54 PM
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Jayfar Jayfar is offline
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Originally Posted by Inquizative View Post
NYC still runs busses that are almost 40 years old. They invest in subway rail, Philly needs to do the same if they want to move up.
ROFL, NYC's decrepit subway system is an eternal shit-show.

They Vowed to Fix the Subway a Year Ago. On-Time Rates Are Still Terrible. | NYTimes.com
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  #9248  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2018, 3:45 PM
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ROFL, NYC's decrepit subway system is an eternal shit-show.

They Vowed to Fix the Subway a Year Ago. On-Time Rates Are Still Terrible. | NYTimes.com
Right?! The praise NY gets around here is crazy.
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  #9249  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2018, 6:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Redddog View Post
Right?! The praise NY gets around here is crazy.
It's not right...

Having lived in NYC and here, I can say NY's subway is leagues above SEPTA. I used their subway. I don't use SEPTA except to get to the stadiums.
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  #9250  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2018, 6:33 PM
mcgrath618 mcgrath618 is offline
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Originally Posted by jsbrook View Post
It's not right...

Having lived in NYC and here, I can say NY's subway is leagues above SEPTA. I used their subway. I don't use SEPTA except to get to the stadiums.
Then you are underutilizing a valuable resource. I'm not sure where you have to go for work so I can't speak on that, but on the weekends when I'm going anywhere even remotely near a subway stop I take it.
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  #9251  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2018, 8:17 PM
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^ I too mainly use SEPTA for sporting events, but that's mainly a function of where else it doesn't go. I think the service is OK and certainly more user friendly that MTA. Too bad that Center City loop planned around the early 1900s never happened.
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  #9252  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2018, 10:09 PM
mcgrath618 mcgrath618 is offline
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Originally Posted by Knight Hospitaller View Post
^ I too mainly use SEPTA for sporting events, but that's mainly a function of where else it doesn't go. I think the service is OK and certainly more user friendly that MTA. Too bad that Center City loop planned around the early 1900s never happened.
People said it would have been a chokepoint but I would argue otherwise. Chicago manages to do it pretty efficiently, albeit tediously.
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  #9253  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2018, 2:29 PM
Redddog Redddog is offline
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Originally Posted by jsbrook View Post
It's not right...

Having lived in NYC and here, I can say NY's subway is leagues above SEPTA. I used their subway. I don't use SEPTA except to get to the stadiums.
We must have experienced two different MTAs. I took that subway everyday from Brooklyn to Wall Street to the Upper East Side and back everyday for 6 years. I have not experienced the "leagues above" you speak of.

Is it as far reaching. Well, no. It doesn't have to be.
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  #9254  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2018, 3:54 PM
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^ The fact you were able to make such a trip, from Brooklyn to Wall Street to the UWS is enough evidence to show how much better NY's subway is than ours.

The NY subway system has 27 lines and 472 stops, spanning nearly the entire city (except Staten Island) and providing access to a large percentage of NYers. In Philly, large chunks of our city - the entire Northeast and Northwest - are devoid of a subway line, excluding a huge number of the city's residents from using it. And where do the SEPTA subways go? Well, there's no direct subway connection to some of the most important job centers in the city - Market West, the Navy Yard, and the hospital district. How shortsighted is that? Even our "stadium" stop is a good 15 minute walk to the actual stadiums.

Also, the NY subway runs 24 hours a day with frequent headways compared and no transfer fee.

But the most telling thing about the NY subway system is that the riders reflect that city's diversity because pretty much everyone uses it: college kids, working professionals, seniors, tourists, the rich, and the poor. In Philly, outside of the rush hour and during some sporting events, it's almost all poor people who have no other choice.

Sorry, but there's no comparison between the MTA and SEPTA. It's not even close and anyone who thinks it is, is delusional.

PS: NY's most recent transit accomplishment: a brand, spanking new (after decades of delays) subway line. Ours? We finally got rid of tokens and the workers who sat behind the both without any change.
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  #9255  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2018, 3:59 PM
Redddog Redddog is offline
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^ The fact you were able to make such a trip, from Brooklyn to Wall Street to the UWS is enough evidence to show how much better NY's subway is than ours.

The NY subway system has 27 lines and 472 stops, spanning nearly the entire city (except Staten Island) and providing access to a large percentage of NYers. In Philly, large chunks of our city - the entire Northeast and Northwest - are devoid of a subway line, excluding a huge number of the city's residents from using it. And where do the SEPTA subways go? Well, there's no direct subway connection to some of the most important job centers in the city - Market West, the Navy Yard, and the hospital district. How shortsighted is that? Even our "stadium" stop is a good 15 minute walk to the actual stadiums.

Also, the NY subway runs 24 hours a day with frequent headways compared and no transfer fee.

But the most telling thing about the NY subway system is that the riders reflect that city's diversity because pretty much everyone uses it: college kids, working professionals, seniors, tourists, the rich, and the poor. In Philly, outside of the rush hour and during some sporting events, it's almost all poor people who have no other choice.

Sorry, but there's no comparison between the MTA and SEPTA. It's not even close and anyone who thinks it is, is delusional.
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  #9256  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2018, 4:01 PM
Redddog Redddog is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
^ The fact you were able to make such a trip, from Brooklyn to Wall Street to the UWS is enough evidence to show how much better NY's subway is than ours.

The NY subway system has 27 lines and 472 stops, spanning nearly the entire city (except Staten Island) and providing access to a large percentage of NYers. In Philly, large chunks of our city - the entire Northeast and Northwest - are devoid of a subway line, excluding a huge number of the city's residents from using it. And where do the SEPTA subways go? Well, there's no direct subway connection to some of the most important job centers in the city - Market West, the Navy Yard, and the hospital district. How shortsighted is that? Even our "stadium" stop is a good 15 minute walk to the actual stadiums.

Also, the NY subway runs 24 hours a day with frequent headways compared and no transfer fee.

But the most telling thing about the NY subway system is that the riders reflect that city's diversity because pretty much everyone uses it: college kids, working professionals, seniors, tourists, the rich, and the poor. In Philly, outside of the rush hour and during some sporting events, it's almost all poor people who have no other choice.

Sorry, but there's no comparison between the MTA and SEPTA. It's not even close and anyone who thinks it is, is delusional.
I bow to you. My delusions often get the best of me.
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  #9257  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2018, 7:14 PM
Skintreesnail Skintreesnail is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
^ The fact you were able to make such a trip, from Brooklyn to Wall Street to the UWS is enough evidence to show how much better NY's subway is than ours.

The NY subway system has 27 lines and 472 stops, spanning nearly the entire city (except Staten Island) and providing access to a large percentage of NYers. In Philly, large chunks of our city - the entire Northeast and Northwest - are devoid of a subway line, excluding a huge number of the city's residents from using it. And where do the SEPTA subways go? Well, there's no direct subway connection to some of the most important job centers in the city - Market West, the Navy Yard, and the hospital district. How shortsighted is that? Even our "stadium" stop is a good 15 minute walk to the actual stadiums.

Also, the NY subway runs 24 hours a day with frequent headways compared and no transfer fee.

But the most telling thing about the NY subway system is that the riders reflect that city's diversity because pretty much everyone uses it: college kids, working professionals, seniors, tourists, the rich, and the poor. In Philly, outside of the rush hour and during some sporting events, it's almost all poor people who have no other choice.

Sorry, but there's no comparison between the MTA and SEPTA. It's not even close and anyone who thinks it is, is delusional.

PS: NY's most recent transit accomplishment: a brand, spanking new (after decades of delays) subway line. Ours? We finally got rid of tokens and the workers who sat behind the both without any change.
I agree you can't compare MTA and SEPTA, but I use the SSL and MFL often enough on the weekends and outside of business hours to know that it's used by all walks of life. It would be nice to get more coverage with subway lines though. That 1913 (or whatever year that was) plan should have been build out, but now it would probably too cost prohibitive and residents would probably complain over construction.

Maybe the SSL idea could be leveraged elsewhere in the city, coupled with unused rail infrastructure like the city branch tunnel. Also, more stops and better headways along the chestnut hill and Norristown RR lines could help with covering the NW better (NE is still kind of screwed without the Roosevelt Boulevard extension, which could branch out to other parts of the NE if it's built as light rail that converges at the Broad street tunnel). Continuing to push for transit-oriented dev is important as well. I know we're not going to get what NYC has, but we can at least take better advantage of what we do have.
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  #9258  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2018, 9:35 PM
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
But the most telling thing about the NY subway system is that the riders reflect that city's diversity because pretty much everyone uses it: college kids, working professionals, seniors, tourists, the rich, and the poor. In Philly, outside of the rush hour and during some sporting events, it's almost all poor people who have no other choice.
I’m going to echo Skintree’s comment that SEPTA is used by all walks of life including off-rush. Are poor people a higher percentage of transit riders in Phila vs. NY? I’m sure but we also have a higher percentage or poor people in general. But now that South Philadelphia, the Riverwards, and U City have exploded, the subway lines have become well traveled by college kids and professional people, especially when compared to 10 or 20 years ago.
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  #9259  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2018, 5:38 AM
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I had posted this a few pages back, but I was also in the lobby 2 days ago and I asked a worker by the office gates and he said it's a virtual reality experience and Steven Spielberg helped develop it
Yeah, my office moved from the Comcast Center to the CTC in late September, so i’ve been walking past the sphere for two months now. They say it’s going to be an interactive experience and better than the video wall at CC. I’ll reserve judgement for now.

One thing I’ve noticed is that the lobby glass ceiling has been leaking a bit when it rains. Fortunately they still have a full construction crew working on the west side of the building, so there are people on site to fix these minor things. And the underground concourse connection from the CTC to Suburban Station opened about a week ago, so when it rains, I can walk underground to half a block from my home, so I don’t get very wet.

I keep running into Glen “Hurricane” Schwartz in the cafeteria, in the elevator, etc. I know I’m running into other on screen talent, but I so rarely watch the local NBC 10 news that I don’t know them. I can deduce that they’re onscreen talent if they get off the elevator on the 12t floor and have TV makeup caked on.

All in all, it’s such a nice building to work in. I never imagined I’d be working in such a beautiful and comfortable building.
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  #9260  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2018, 7:24 AM
allovertown allovertown is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
^ The fact you were able to make such a trip, from Brooklyn to Wall Street to the UWS is enough evidence to show how much better NY's subway is than ours.

The NY subway system has 27 lines and 472 stops, spanning nearly the entire city (except Staten Island) and providing access to a large percentage of NYers. In Philly, large chunks of our city - the entire Northeast and Northwest - are devoid of a subway line, excluding a huge number of the city's residents from using it. And where do the SEPTA subways go? Well, there's no direct subway connection to some of the most important job centers in the city - Market West, the Navy Yard, and the hospital district. How shortsighted is that? Even our "stadium" stop is a good 15 minute walk to the actual stadiums.

Also, the NY subway runs 24 hours a day with frequent headways compared and no transfer fee.

But the most telling thing about the NY subway system is that the riders reflect that city's diversity because pretty much everyone uses it: college kids, working professionals, seniors, tourists, the rich, and the poor. In Philly, outside of the rush hour and during some sporting events, it's almost all poor people who have no other choice.

Sorry, but there's no comparison between the MTA and SEPTA. It's not even close and anyone who thinks it is, is delusional.

PS: NY's most recent transit accomplishment: a brand, spanking new (after decades of delays) subway line. Ours? We finally got rid of tokens and the workers who sat behind the both without any change.
There is no arguing which is the better system. The MTA is however in a sense a victim of it's own success. As someone who has taken the MTA many times, it is an asset that you can't live without... and it's also kind of a really unpleasant experience.

SEPTA is so much less useful than the MTA and does so much less. But what it does, it does pretty well, especially when you enter funding into the equation. There have been times in my life, when I've had a commute that was perfectly served by a subway station. At one point I lived a few blocks from the Oregon Station and worked right next to the Race/Vine Station. That commute was a piece of cake and so much better than any experience you'd have traveling over 5 miles on the MTA.

Now granted, a big reason why the ride was so much more comfortable was because the subway was so much less crowded because it is so much less useful to so many people depending on where they live and work. But I really think that is the biggest factor, if the subway works for your commute in Philly you'd be kind of crazy not to take it, it's pretty good. I've definitely seen people of all walks of life on the subway, hell I've even seen Mayor Street on he subway a bunch of times.

So while I agree that the MTA is just indisputably a better system, at the end of the day it's just another point on the long list of why NYC is objectively better than philly. But despite also those objective facts favoring NYC, they don't necessarily add up to NYC being a more enjoyable place to live and the MTA is a poster child for this.
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