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  #11401  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2018, 2:57 PM
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CDOT Expanding Bustang™ to Central Rockies, Southwest Colorado
June 26, 2018
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DENVER – Beginning this weekend, people living the Gunnison Valley and in southwestern Colorado will have a new way to travel to Denver, Grand Junction and other locations, including areas along the Front Range beginning next week.
What's you gonna do now?
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The southwest Outrider™ service will run once a day in each direction: Durango to Grand Junction in the morning; Grand Junction to Durango in the afternoon, Monday through Sunday.

Gunnison’s Outrider service also will travel once a day in each direction--from the Econo Lodge in Gunnison [to] Denver’s Union Station.
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  #11402  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2018, 6:03 AM
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Interesting analysis and thoughts about transit ridership
by the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies
Published on Jun 6, 2018


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  #11403  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2018, 4:41 AM
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Interesting analysis and thoughts about transit ridership
by the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies
Published on Jun 6, 2018


Video Link
Drivers in California, or any State for that matter are not using the roads for free. They already pay a gasoline tax, tolls and whatever other sources of revenue are used to build and maintain the networks. If the public transit systems worked, people would use them. But this is the typical Government solution telling people what they will allow them to do rather than the other way around.

I live in Golden very near the Taj Mahal light rail station and work in the Tech Center at Orchard and I-25. Boy oh boy do I wish I could hop on a magical transportation system that would whisk me off to work each day in climate controlled comfort. The reality is it is an hour and a half minimum each way. That is unacceptable and unnecessary. The slow speed and frequent stops along with a downtown train change make light rail a lousy choice for anyone commuting from the west side.

The gasoline tax in Colorado is $0.22. The gasoline tax in Utah was recently raised from $0.245 to $0.294. The interesting thing about that is that while Utah's tax may have been slightly higher than Colorado's for several years, it wasn't that much higher with a smaller population. Utah still managed to make dramatic improvements to their freeway infrastructure. I'd like an accounting of how Colorado has spent more money based on a larger population and achieved substantially poorer results.

I would be completely in favor of raising the gasoline tax for road improvements as long as any other money earmarked for roads isn't diverted to something else. I think quite honestly that our state has done an extremely poor job of planning for and making realistic assumptions about our growth. In fact it's obvious to anyone who has a commute. Couple that with public transportation that doesn't work for a lot of people and here we are.
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  #11404  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2018, 4:02 PM
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Originally Posted by FunctionForm View Post
Drivers in California, or any State for that matter are not using the roads for free. They already pay a gasoline tax, tolls and whatever other sources of revenue are used to build and maintain the networks. If the public transit systems worked, people would use them. But this is the typical Government solution telling people what they will allow them to do rather than the other way around.

I live in Golden very near the Taj Mahal light rail station and work in the Tech Center at Orchard and I-25. Boy oh boy do I wish I could hop on a magical transportation system that would whisk me off to work each day in climate controlled comfort. The reality is it is an hour and a half minimum each way. That is unacceptable and unnecessary. The slow speed and frequent stops along with a downtown train change make light rail a lousy choice for anyone commuting from the west side.

The gasoline tax in Colorado is $0.22. The gasoline tax in Utah was recently raised from $0.245 to $0.294. The interesting thing about that is that while Utah's tax may have been slightly higher than Colorado's for several years, it wasn't that much higher with a smaller population. Utah still managed to make dramatic improvements to their freeway infrastructure. I'd like an accounting of how Colorado has spent more money based on a larger population and achieved substantially poorer results.

I would be completely in favor of raising the gasoline tax for road improvements as long as any other money earmarked for roads isn't diverted to something else. I think quite honestly that our state has done an extremely poor job of planning for and making realistic assumptions about our growth. In fact it's obvious to anyone who has a commute. Couple that with public transportation that doesn't work for a lot of people and here we are.
That's really interesting, especially since people love to cry about how much they want rail service. Yet, you just demonstrated that it doesn't always work out for people, especially if the rail makes too many stops. For me, I live in Jefferson Park, and work in Boulder. I actually prefer to use transit in the form of the Flatiron Flyer. It's less stressful, and I can get stuff done on the bus. But, the bus has an express service that runs every 10 minutes during rush hours, which makes the commuting super fast. One has to think express routes for some of the rail corridors should be explored. In your case, if there was a route that went straight to Union Station, then another express route down to DTC, you probably would have more incentive to take transit.
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  #11405  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2018, 3:40 PM
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What metro Denver needs, is a metro-wide sales tax, boarding tax and gas tax initiative. Perhaps 0.3% sales tax, 3% boarding/lodging tax and a 6 cents/gallon fuel tax increase for transportation projects. Make it a 30-year tax to raise ~$30 billion in funds, but to all be spent in the first 15 years of that duration, via bonding.

Allocate $15 billion to road and highway projects, with an emphasis on adding grade separated intersections to high capacity roadways, expressways and freeways. Adding AI traffic management technology and managed lanes to highways and expressways. Adding AI traffic signal managing technology to all major arterial roadways.

$10 billion allocated for the following transit improvements:
Add true BRT infrastructure to all major transit routes
Add extra tracking to existing rail lines to create express service passing track.
Complete NW corridor rail as a fully electrified and 150 mph high speed corridor.
Eleminate 50% of existing grade crossing on current rail network.
Add some small rail extensions and spurs to the network

Then the final $5 billion would be allocated to build a subway link from Broadway/I-25 Station to Civic Center Station to Union Station. This should use LRT technology for full integration with all the LRT lines converging on Broadway Station. This also will provide a third route for accessing downtown, relieving the Central Corridor and CPV corridor. Civic Center should have a large underground station built not only to accommodate this, but to also allow for built-in east/west expansion capacity.

Then also terminate full size LRT vehicle central corridor lines at Convention Center Station and fully convert the downtown loop into a high frequency streetcar starter system. Or possible take the LRT's underground coming out of the convention center and tie it into the subway line into Union Station. Either option converts the downtown loop into a single or double car streetcar line.


https://www.google.com/maps/d/drive?...48918317%22%7D
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Last edited by SnyderBock; Jul 6, 2018 at 4:32 PM.
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  #11406  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2018, 7:32 PM
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Looks like the other major airport project is getting underway starting next week.......

https://www.denverpost.com/2018/07/0...ction-impacts/

I have mixed feelings about this one. Mostly because I am skeptical the new security layout will speed things up. I don't really feel like things are slow right now at all. Maybe if the layout is done correctly, and new technology is put into place to speed things up.

At the same time, I do think having the Grand Hall open with bars/restaurants/retail will be a cool addition. It will give travelers a great first impression of the airport. Plus, I am always for more restaurants/retail at DIA......
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  #11407  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:21 AM
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What metro Denver needs...
Love your vision; well done.
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  #11408  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 4:52 PM
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Then the final $5 billion would be allocated to build a subway link from Broadway/I-25 Station to Civic Center Station to Union Station. This should use LRT technology for full integration with all the LRT lines converging on Broadway Station. This also will provide a third route for accessing downtown, relieving the Central Corridor and CPV corridor. Civic Center should have a large underground station built not only to accommodate this, but to also allow for built-in east/west expansion capacity.

https://www.google.com/maps/d/drive?...48918317%22%7D
I'd vote for it, but why a Broadway subway instead of a Colfax subway?
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  #11409  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 8:29 PM
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That's really interesting, especially since people love to cry about how much they want rail service. Yet, you just demonstrated that it doesn't always work out for people, especially if the rail makes too many stops. For me, I live in Jefferson Park, and work in Boulder. I actually prefer to use transit in the form of the Flatiron Flyer. It's less stressful, and I can get stuff done on the bus. But, the bus has an express service that runs every 10 minutes during rush hours, which makes the commuting super fast. One has to think express routes for some of the rail corridors should be explored. In your case, if there was a route that went straight to Union Station, then another express route down to DTC, you probably would have more incentive to take transit.
I live in Stapleton and occasionally take the R line to work in Lone Tree. I look at 3 things: Cost/Time/Hassle. Currently, it takes me around 50 min. on average to drive each way to work, door to door. The R line takes me about an hour and 10 min. door to door. So time savings is out. Cost is out too, since I drive a hybrid ($2.25 round trip for gas vs. $5 (or whatever it is) on the train. So the only plus for me is avoiding the hassle of driving. If the R line weren't so slow between the A line and the Aurora Mall, it would probably be a time saver too.
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  #11410  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 8:31 PM
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I live in Stapleton and occasionally take the R line to work in Lone Tree. I look at 3 things: Cost/Time/Hassle. Currently, it takes me around 50 min. on average to drive each way to work, door to door. The R line takes me about an hour and 10 min. door to door. So time savings is out. Cost is out too, since I drive a hybrid ($2.25 round trip for gas vs. $5 (or whatever it is) on the train. So the only plus for me is avoiding the hassle of driving. If the R line weren't so slow between the A line and the Aurora Mall, it would probably be a time saver too.
The A line to downtown, however, makes total sense for me. It saves time, saves on cost (no paying to park), and is hassle free.
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  #11411  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 8:33 PM
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Originally Posted by twister244 View Post
Looks like the other major airport project is getting underway starting next week.......

https://www.denverpost.com/2018/07/0...ction-impacts/

I have mixed feelings about this one. Mostly because I am skeptical the new security layout will speed things up. I don't really feel like things are slow right now at all. Maybe if the layout is done correctly, and new technology is put into place to speed things up.

At the same time, I do think having the Grand Hall open with bars/restaurants/retail will be a cool addition. It will give travelers a great first impression of the airport. Plus, I am always for more restaurants/retail at DIA......
My understanding was that moving the security lines was more for the sake of security. As it is today, someone could park on the curb at arrivals and run in and start shooting down at hundreds of people in the security lines or chuck a bomb over.
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  #11412  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 9:12 PM
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My understanding was that moving the security lines was more for the sake of security. As it is today, someone could park on the curb at arrivals and run in and start shooting down at hundreds of people in the security lines or chuck a bomb over.
Totally agree. I am just hoping they put in enough security to keep the pace at current or speed it up with new technologies. Keep in mind they will be eliminating the bridge security as part of this upgrade too. Aside from that concern, I think this project actually has potential to make the Grand Hall more than just a pass-through.
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  #11413  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2018, 3:43 AM
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Has RTD rolled out transit signal priority yet? I asked the driver on the 10 and she hadn't heard of it.
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  #11414  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2018, 4:14 AM
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Has RTD rolled out transit signal priority yet? I asked the driver on the 10 and she hadn't heard of it.
The City of Denver and RTD have TSP at 10 locations along East Colfax. I also believe there is TSP at an intersection somewhere in Westminster.

There’s also some old toll tag reader TSP on Colorado Blvd. It is not used anymore.

RTD just released a preliminary design plan for speed and reliability improvements along 7 corridors in the region that include TSP (among other treatments).
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  #11415  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2018, 1:55 PM
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RTD just released a preliminary design plan for speed and reliability improvements along 7 corridors in the region that include TSP (among other treatments).
Ok, thanks. I was under the impression they were implementing it along all the corridors together. Such a quick and easy improvement, I hope they don't delay it much longer.
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  #11416  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 2:52 AM
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I'd vote for it, but why a Broadway subway instead of a Colfax subway?
Please note, I was proposing the underground Civic Center Station be designed with built in, east-west subway expansion capacity. There are many reasons as to why Broadway would be built first...

1.) Colfax corridor is having a BRT line constructed. This BRT line will need to be operational and given time to mature, before we can accurately determine the necessity and priority (over other potential projects) for a subway down Colfax.

2.) Broadway Station is a hub station, making it ideal to feed multiple routes into Denver's first subway. If the subway uses LRT's and the track comes up to at-grade and connects into the track at Broadway Station, lines from I-225, SE and SW could all be fed into the Broadway subway as a new entry into downtown and Union Station.

3.) This would relieve congested lines currently using the at-grade downtown Central Corridor loop.

4.) Density along this stretch of Santa Fe/Broadway/Lincoln/Sherman/Logan corridor is high and comparable to anything along Colfax.

5.) Union Station to Broadway Station connects two major hubs together, with a third major hub, Civic Center Station in the middle Colfax Subway would have no natural terminus, unless it ran all the way out to I-225 LRT/A-Line/Peroria Station.
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Last edited by SnyderBock; Jul 13, 2018 at 3:04 AM.
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  #11417  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 4:41 AM
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A $700 million groundbreaking does not happen every day

..
Credit: CBS4/Denver)

‘Creating Jobs’: Magic Johnson Talks About DIA Great Hall Project
July 12, 2018 By Shawn Chitnis/DENVER (CBS4)
Quote:
City leaders and the partners overseeing a massive project to redesign the main terminal at Denver International Airport celebrated the start of the Great Hall Project Thursday with more details on the plans leading up to its completion in 2021.
Remind me who the key players are.
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Key players for the project including the group of companies that make up Great Hall Partners were inside the terminal speaking about the long-term impact of these improvements. One of those partners is NBA legend Earvin “Magic” Johnson. Ferrovial Airports will be the lead of Great Hall Partners. The company chairman says the project will help keep Denver relevant to a global audience.
Quote of the day:
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“Standing under these iconic tents,” said Rafael del Pino. “[They] serve as the gateway to this incredible city where the Rocky Mountains meet the world.”
Think about that... where Denver meets the world.
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  #11418  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2018, 10:31 PM
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There's nothing new here that I could see...

Mayor Michael Hancock seemed to give transportation and mobility short-shrift in today's State of the City address. Oh there were the obligatory buzz-phrases about what the Streetsblog Denver crowd wants to hear but I saw nothing (concrete) beyond a few visionary statements and plans already in place. For those that were hoping for a stepped-up commitment of discretionary spending, all I heard were references to the now-named 'Elevate Denver Bonds' passed last year and a hope that the Denver Chamber's statewide proposal for new transportation taxes passes in November. The only exception would be some additional nickel and dime stuff, like sidewalk repairs in neighborhoods for example.

Perhaps I'm putting the cart before the horse a bit as Denveright/Denver Moves final report and recommendations are still pending. It seems though that any new discretionary funds will address other priorities and that additional funding for transit/mobility will have to be approved by voters - which is what I had suspected all along.
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  #11419  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2018, 3:21 PM
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Another southern metropolis smaller & less urban than Denver is considering a downtown light rail subway. This time Charlotte.
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  #11420  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2018, 6:01 PM
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Another southern metropolis smaller & less urban than Denver is considering a downtown light rail subway. This time Charlotte.
Sounds like an underground pipe-dream.

Politics is a Fickle Mistress

Transit Systems Face Shortfalls After State Budget Cut
By DAVID BORAKS • JUL 3, 2018/WFAE
Quote:
State funding for public transportation was cut 26 percent in the budget passed last month by the Republican-controlled General Assembly. That has local agencies like Charlotte Area Transit System scrambling to replace the funds.

Lawmakers shrank the size of the State Maintenance Assistance Program, which helps local bus and transit systems pay for things like drivers' salaries, fuel, insurance and vehicle maintenance.
How will this affect Charlotte?
Quote:
In the fiscal year that ended June 30, CATS got about $11.1 million from the state. This year, it's getting $3.2 million less, or a cut of about 29 percent. The big question is whether CATS - and other affected agencies - will have to reduce service.
Denver is fortunate they created RTD decades ago. Metro funded transportation is working very well for Phoenix and Seattle. At this point RTD could use more funding but still it's in (relatively) good shape.

Denver has their city eyes on funding better transit/mobility options some day; meanwhile, there will be 5 different ballot proposals for increased taxes supporting various causes this November. The proposal to fund parks, trails and open space with a .25 percent sales tax should pass easily; dunno about the others.
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