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  #1  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2017, 7:48 PM
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In Miami, David Beckham Has Wrought America’s Best Stadium Deal

In Miami, David Beckham Has Wrought America’s Best Stadium Deal


JUNE 7 2017

By Henry Grabar

Read More: http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/...dium_deal.html

Quote:
.....

Beckham’s proposed 25,000-seat stadium would be blocks from Miami Metrorail and the Miami River, and a half-mile from the new All Aboard Florida station. It would be privately owned, privately funded, and built on private land—no municipal bonds, no tax breaks. The most revolutionary part of all? No parking garages. The stadium group is counting on fans to come by transit, by shuttle from nearby garages, by taxi, and on foot. It has also proposed chartering fan ferries to pilot up the Miami River.

- It’s a model deal for a city that sees itself as a newly urbanized, mixed-use metropolis. Downtown Miami’s population has more than doubled since 2000, from 40,000 to 89,000. The skyline bristles with new residential towers. America’s first private passenger rail service in a half-century will open there in September, offering service north to Fort Lauderdale and Palm Beach. But in some ways, Miami-Dade wasn’t an obvious place to rewrite the rules of the stadium deal. The county owns and subsidizes American Airlines Arena, home of the worst fans in basketball, and recently agreed to pay the owners of the Miami Dolphins to host major events—including a $4 million bonus for a Super Bowl.

- The shimmering swindle in Little Havana known as Marlins Park has been called “the worst public works project in Miami history,” and will cost Miami residents for decades to come. But a collision of factors led to a better deal this time. For starters, the MLS—which gave Beckham a huge discount on the league’s expansion fee when he inked his contract to play for the L.A. Galaxy a decade ago—insisted on a downtown stadium location. That meant the Miami group couldn’t get Broward County and Miami-Dade into a local bidding war, of the type that brought the Atlanta Braves to Cobb County. It also kept the team from considering a reported offer from the American Dream Miami, a planned suburban megamall northwest of Miami that represents a more familiar style of South Florida development.

- Now, Beckham & co. must get zoning approval from the City of Miami. And would you believe it, the biggest fight, the Miami Herald reports, is going to be over parking. (Most developers overbuild parking according to the demands of the city or commercial tenants, and residents tend to cause an uproar over exceptions that might threaten their own God-given curbside parking spot.) But with a deal to buy the two-block site in place, there will be pressure on Miami to approve the $220 million stadium, which also includes a year-round jobs guarantee. So, maybe it would be too much to say that David Beckham is responsible for bending this stadium deal into shape. But he’s not just a pretty face: Beckham’s sweetheart $25 million expansion fee, compared with the market price of $150 million, makes it possible for the Miami group to accept a better deal for the public than its counterparts might pitch in rival cities.

.....



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  #2  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2017, 8:08 PM
Djesus777 Djesus777 is offline
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People in Miami hate the transit there, not only is it horrid, but they even cut back on service. So people are gonna end up taking their cars there, also knowing how Miami fans are, once the team starts losing, they'll stop showing up to games or support others.
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Old Posted Jun 11, 2017, 8:50 PM
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Unless there are thousands of nearby parking spaces, this will never work. Nice sentiment, but not realistic.

Wouldn't even work in equivalent areas in most transit-oriented cities. In South Florida no one is taking the bus from Coral Gables or wherever to watch a soccer match.
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Old Posted Jun 11, 2017, 9:00 PM
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Maybe just focus on the part about it being privately built with no tax money.
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Old Posted Jun 11, 2017, 9:22 PM
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Lets not forget about American Dream, aka U.S.'s largest mall proposal. The expect 300k visitors a day. Imagine the traffic nightmare for that area.
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Old Posted Jun 11, 2017, 10:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Unless there are thousands of nearby parking spaces, this will never work. Nice sentiment, but not realistic.

Wouldn't even work in equivalent areas in most transit-oriented cities. In South Florida no one is taking the bus from Coral Gables or wherever to watch a soccer match.
This might be kind of a unique case. Soccer fans, at least here in Chicago, tend to fall into two camps: wealthy, educated elites and working-class Latinos.

The wealthier fans tend to be familiar with European culture, lean liberal (usually) and probably wouldn't scoff at taking transit to a soccer game, at least if there was a convenient rail option. With a Metrorail stop near the stadium site, that seems somewhat plausible.

The Latino fans are more of a unknown, surely some of them would be comfortable taking a bus or train, but I also know the car culture in Miami is huge.

Another factor, I wouldn't underestimate the power of the private sector to provide parking. It looks like there are many large parcels of vacant land east of the stadium around I-95 where you could park hundreds of cars easily with little or no improvements needed. Couple that with a permit-parking program on streets, and you end up with a Wrigley Field situation... parking is available but scarce and therefore expensive, so price-sensitive fans will find another way to get to the game.
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Last edited by ardecila; Jun 11, 2017 at 10:57 PM.
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Old Posted Jun 11, 2017, 11:10 PM
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Except for the land part, this deal just about describes both the Giant's stadium (AT&T Park) and the U/C Warriors arena (Chase Center) in San Francisco. San Francisco, perhaps unlike Miami, happened to have a large brownfield site, a former rail yard called Mission Bay, which is being redeveloped over more than a decade in which is wanted to encourage development so it has made sites available to the 2 teams there, but the money for construction and subsequent ownership is all private and niether site will, when everything is finished, have much parking for cars. AT&T Park sits at what will be the juncture of 2 light rail lines and across the street from a commuter rail terminal. Chase center is on one of those light rail lines a bit further down the waterfront. Both stadia will also be seved by ferry/water taxi transportation.

AT&T Park (owned and built by the Giants)

http://sanfrancisco.giants.mlb.com/sf/ballpark/

Chase Center (being built and to be owned by the Warriors)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chase_...(San_Francisco)
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Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 5:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Djesus777 View Post
People in Miami hate the transit there, not only is it horrid, but they even cut back on service. So people are gonna end up taking their cars there, also knowing how Miami fans are, once the team starts losing, they'll stop showing up to games or support others.
People in Miami don't hate mass transit they just hate the rail transit they have which is very limited.
Metromover downtown carries over 30,000 passengers on it's 4.8 mile route on a daily basis so your statement is inaccurate.
This soccer stadium will be less than a mile from a Metrorail station.
Believe it or not when the Orange Bowl still existed and was home to the Miami Dolphins & the University of Miami Hurricanes football team in the 1980's thousands of fans didn't have parking garages nearby and they parked on people's lawns in Little Havana where they were charged and walked to the stadium anyways and this was before Metrorail.

As for "losing" teams when you dismiss your roster after winning 2 World Series like the Marlins did & threaten to leave the area it really was hard to maintain the fan base.
You should know about fan loyalty though when the Expos dumped your Montreal for DC.
Not to mention for exporting Loria to Miami.
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Last edited by bobdreamz; Jun 12, 2017 at 6:29 AM.
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  #9  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
Except for the land part, this deal just about describes both the Giant's stadium (AT&T Park) and the U/C Warriors arena (Chase Center) in San Francisco.
There's plenty of parking around AT&T Park. And not only private parking, but Giants parking.

http://sanfrancisco.giants.mlb.com/s...ing_tailgating

The article seems to imply that this Miami arena lacks any adjacent parking, and that visitors will be dependent on transit (and presumably taxis/Uber). That would be pretty odd, esp. in a city like Miami.

Even in Europe, major soccer arenas have plenty of parking. Stade de France in Paris and Allianz Arena in Munich have loads of parking, and these cities have fantastic transit.
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Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 1:06 PM
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It should also be pointed at that this is Overtown. Not the most pleasant place to walk through. This is what the walk between the metrorail station and the stadium site looks like:
https://www.google.com/maps/@25.7828...7i13312!8i6656
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Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 2:46 PM
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The quality of the walk seems important. If there's a wide sidewalk and you can talk to your friends, that's comraderie and part of the game's enjoyment. If you're going single-file down a major road and weaving past the slow folks, not so much.

All of my city's stadiums and arenas rely on walk sheds. Driving is popular despite good transit to all of them, which of course fills up. They all have some parking onsite but most people walk, maybe a half mile or a mile. This becomes part of the game atmosphere.
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Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 3:19 PM
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It could also be too hot to walk for too long.
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Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 5:11 PM
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This Miami stadium has been in the works for years and years and years (or at least since Beckham retired). I'll believe it when I see it.
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Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 6:57 PM
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How many entities out there can afford private land to privately build a stadium where a city and taxpayers are off the hook.
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Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 7:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
There's plenty of parking around AT&T Park. And not only private parking, but Giants parking.
It's due to be developed: By the Giants. It's a temporary parking lot only and that was always the plan.


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Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 7:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M II A II R II K View Post
How many entities out there can afford private land to privately build a stadium where a city and taxpayers are off the hook.
Nearly all of the major league professional sports teams in major markets can afford it but then, of course, they wouldn't make as much money for their billionaire owners and might have to economize by paying lower salaries to their multimillionaire players. There may be a few teams in the smallest markets who truly couldn't afford it but they are a minority.

One other consideration that affects the public interest, though, is where the sites are. While nearly always private land can be acquired, it is not always ideally sited. By donating the land, cities can control where the stadia are built and control their own burdens for new infrastructure etc.
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Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 6:59 PM
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Originally Posted by M II A II R II K View Post
How many entities out there can afford private land to privately build a stadium where a city and taxpayers are off the hook.
The question is not how many entities can "afford" it, but how many cities don't fall for the blackmail from sports leagues and owners to use public money?

L.A. doesn't use public tax money on stadiums, and right now two are being built with private funds:

Hollywood Park NFL Stadium (opening 2021):

https://la.curbed.com/2015/3/23/9977...billboard-roof

LAFC MLS Stadium (opening 2018):

https://www.mobilesportsreport.com/2...occer-stadium/

My understanding is that the NY Giants/Jets stadium was built with private money. If you are a major market you shouldn't pony up taxpayer money to build stadiums. Lesser markets that can be leveraged by greedy owners will usually pay up (Atlanta, Minneapolis are a couple that come to mind that have new taxpayer funded stadiums opening.)
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Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 7:11 PM
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It's easier in a bigger and richer city. Land prices and construction costs will generally be higher, but naming rights, luxury box sales, season ticket sales, broadcast deals, shirt sales, etc., tend to be much better. Depending on the league and local arrangments, a large percentage of that can flow to the team directly.

Seattle's potential rebuild of Key Arena is also privately financed. But they'd start with the existing Key Arena roof and land...saving the roof probably costs way more than it saves, but I'd guesstimate the land would be worth in the low six figures. The mayor appears to prefer this over a proposal to use private land but require public financial help and a street vacation, with a location by the stadiums south of Downtown.
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Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 1:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragnar View Post
The question is not how many entities can "afford" it, but how many cities don't fall for the blackmail from sports leagues and owners to use public money?

L.A. doesn't use public tax money on stadiums, and right now two are being built with private funds:

Hollywood Park NFL Stadium (opening 2021):

https://la.curbed.com/2015/3/23/9977...billboard-roof

LAFC MLS Stadium (opening 2018):

https://www.mobilesportsreport.com/2...occer-stadium/

My understanding is that the NY Giants/Jets stadium was built with private money. If you are a major market you shouldn't pony up taxpayer money to build stadiums. Lesser markets that can be leveraged by greedy owners will usually pay up (Atlanta, Minneapolis are a couple that come to mind that have new taxpayer funded stadiums opening.)

Breaking news, make that 3 privately funded arenas / stadiums in LA as the Clippers will be announcing a deal with the city of Inglewood tomorrow.
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Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 1:50 AM
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Originally Posted by bobdreamz View Post
Believe it or not when the Orange Bowl still existed and was home to the Miami Dolphins & the University of Miami Hurricanes football team in the 1980's thousands of fans didn't have parking garages nearby and they parked on people's lawns in Little Havana where they were charged and walked to the stadium anyways and this was before Metrorail.
Do cities in Florida not have laws against parking on your lawn? That's the kind of thing you expect to see in a small rural town somewhere. Not in a major metro area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dave8721 View Post
It should also be pointed at that this is Overtown. Not the most pleasant place to walk through. This is what the walk between the metrorail station and the stadium site looks like:
https://www.google.com/maps/@25.7828...7i13312!8i6656
I don't see too many families making that walk.
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