HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #21  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 12:04 AM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,290
I guess one could say cultural ties and commuting patterns aren't necessarily synonymous (especially with the county "domino effect").

Hence Fairfield is more tied to Manhattan/NYC culturally than say, Toms River NJ.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 1:34 AM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 16,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
Hence Fairfield is more tied to Manhattan/NYC culturally than say, Toms River NJ.
Yes, definitely. Fairfield is even more tied to Manhattan than close-in NY counties west of the Hudson, or outer parts of LI.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 5:53 AM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,290
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMich View Post
We've kind of been over the San Francisco/San Jose one a million times. It's the one most egregious example of the current limitations of how they dileanate these. Basically, the statistical merging of urban areas to formed a new MSA only occurs under the strictest of circumstances, and the other criteria for merging MSAs (25% commuting threshold between the "central" counties) isn't met between the two.

People complain about the physical size of American metropolitan statistical areas, but the truth is that it's kind of a mixed bag. The criteria advantages an isolated metro to "grow," whereas really established regions with multiple strong cores can literally grow into one another in a spatial sense and still don't constitute a metropolitan area because the smaller cores keep a lot of their commuters in county. A great local example of this are Ann Arbor and Detroit, two urban areas which the Census officially showed had grown together at 2010, but whose metros will likely not join any time soon because the Ann Arbor urban area accounts for far more of the population in the country than the Detroit urban area, and because the MSA/county keeps far more of its commuters than it sends to the central counties of the Detroit MSA, even though the interchange rate is well over the 25% threshold.

Anyway, the Census/OMB is doing a fairly major revision of delineation criteria this year. We'll see which factors they change.

EDIT: Did the tedious work for calculating the commuter interchange between the central counties of the NYC MSA and Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk MSA (Fairfield County), and what I got is that is that it's nowhere near being pulled in as part of the MSA. Fairfield County sends 12.9% of its resident workers to the NYC MSA. You need a full 25% to qualify to be included in an MSA or that more than half the population in an urban area within the smaller MSA must be from the urban area of the larger MSA spilling over into the smaller MSA. To figure out the CSA is't the total exchange between all counties in each MSA, not just the core. I imagine, then, that Fairfield is probably even barely within the CSA when you add in the additional NYC MSA outyling counties.
Where can I find this commuting data?
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 4:21 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.