HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 5:37 AM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 5,204
This is the U.S. county that buys the least healthful groceries

Quote:
By Caitlin Dewey February 6 at 7:00 AM Email the author

An emerging body of research suggests that some groups of consumers may simply be less interested in buying healthful groceries than others. (iStock)
The 4,500 people of Musselshell County, Mont., collectively buy the least healthful groceries of any county in the United States. Their baskets are loaded with fat and sugar, Nielsen data show. They aren’t big on fiber or protein.

There’s a debate among economists and public health advocates over why communities like Musselshell tend to eat so poorly. For years, advocates have argued that it’s largely a problem of access: Consumers eat junk because they can’t afford healthful foods or find them in their communities. Now, an emerging body of research suggests that some groups of consumers may simply be less interested than others in buying healthful groceries.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.5f3a38682130
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 6:56 AM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Houston/Galveston
Posts: 1,467
Where now?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 1:10 PM
James Bond Agent 007's Avatar
James Bond Agent 007 James Bond Agent 007 is offline
Posh
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
Posts: 18,066
Quote:
Now, an emerging body of research suggests that some groups of consumers may simply be less interested than others in buying healthful groceries.
That's so obvious. I don't know why so many people for so long kept going with the "access" thing, you can see people buying mostly unhealthy things in supermarkets filled with natural food sections, fresh produce sections and every other healthy alternative you can think of.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 1:28 PM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,023
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond Agent 007 View Post
That's so obvious. I don't know why so many people for so long kept going with the "access" thing, you can see people buying mostly unhealthy things in supermarkets filled with natural food sections, fresh produce sections and every other healthy alternative you can think of.
They do it because it creates a victim-class. And with a victim, you have an excuse. The fact is a lot of poorer Americans like bad food. After a long day of taking the bus to and from work, working manual labor, what sounds better? A bag of fatty chips and pork or a salad? Lets be real.

A grocery store in my area purposely located in a bad area of town. He lowered the price of healthy foods, from low fat snacks to fruit and veggies while also RAISING the price on sodas and bad snacks. His results? Nothing changed other than people stopped coming there because they weren't there for healthy food.

In rural Arkansas, when you go to Walmart, people RARELY have healthy food in their carts, its part of the culture.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 1:41 PM
Sun Belt Sun Belt is offline
'Sunny'
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Sunshine and Shorts
Posts: 1,255
Low fat and fat free foods are not healthy alternatives but marketing has fooled consumers that they have made a healthy choice by selecting these products.

Also don't drink juice.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 2:45 PM
glowrock's Avatar
glowrock glowrock is offline
Becoming Chicago-fied!
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Chicago (Lakeview East)
Posts: 19,146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
Low fat and fat free foods are not healthy alternatives but marketing has fooled consumers that they have made a healthy choice by selecting these products.

Also don't drink juice.
That's both true and false, Sun Belt. Nothing wrong with NATURALLY low fat and fat-free foods, and nothing with with drinking fruit or vegetable juice, either. It's the products that have been grossly modified to become either fat-free or low-fat that are naturally NOT this way (usually by adding tons and tons of sugar and salt and preservatives/flavorings/colorings) that are the problem. And for juice, obviously they have plenty of natural sugars, so anyone who thinks they're automatically low-cal or super-healthy because they're "natural" is out of their minds. But at least they do have lots of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants in them, depending on what fruits/vegetables are in them of course.

Aaron (Glowrock)
__________________
"The three most beautiful cities in the world are Paris, St. Petersburg & Pittsburgh. If Pittsburgh were situated somewhere in the heart of Europe tourists would eagerly journey hundreds of miles out of their way to visit it." The New Yorker Jan. 9, 1989
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 2:54 PM
tascalisa's Avatar
tascalisa tascalisa is offline
Discovered in 1593
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Birmingham-Huffman
Posts: 3,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
The stupid map's "AL" label for Alabama literally covers up the two most populous counties in the Birmingham metro... they account for about 900,000 people. WaPo needs a better cartographer...
__________________
SSP Alabama Metros: Birmingham (City Compilation) - Huntsville - Mobile - Montgomery - Tuscaloosa - Daphne-Fairhope - Decatur

SSP Alabama Universities: Alabama - UAB - Alabama State
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 3:54 PM
BG918's Avatar
BG918 BG918 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 2,773
The biggest surprise is that the counties aren't all clustered in the South but include a sizable chunk of the upper Midwest and upstate New York.

When I think of the most healthy states I think of Washington, Oregon, California and Hawaii which seems to be true based on this map. You can also tell where cities are located vs. rural areas.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 5:15 PM
Cirrus's Avatar
Cirrus Cirrus is offline
cities|transit|croissants
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 17,739
This is just a proxy for poor. Poor people don't buy unhealthy foods because they lack access to grocery stores (the food deserts thing is wrong); they buy unhealthy foods because unhealthy foods are cheaper, because salt and corn syrup are the cheapest ingredients.
__________________
BeyondDC: blog | twitter | flickr | instagram | Exploring urbanism and transportation in the Washington, DC area.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 5:18 PM
James Bond Agent 007's Avatar
James Bond Agent 007 James Bond Agent 007 is offline
Posh
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
Posts: 18,066
I don't even think unhealthy foods are cheaper, per se. You can buy a lot of healthy stuff on a budget if you really wanted to. I think it's just an immediate gratification kind of thing - junk food is more satisfying and filling to a segment of the population that tends to have relatively little satisfying things in life. Plus it tends to be easier to prepare.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 6:23 PM
Khantilever Khantilever is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Chicago
Posts: 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
This is just a proxy for poor. Poor people don't buy unhealthy foods because they lack access to grocery stores (the food deserts thing is wrong); they buy unhealthy foods because unhealthy foods are cheaper, because salt and corn syrup are the cheapest ingredients.
You should read the paper discussed in this article. It’s not about price, either. That’s what their counterfactual simulation looks into; even give lower prices, would low-income households buy much more healthy food? The answer seems to be no.

It’s not about convenience, either. I don’t remember if it’s discussed in the paper, but one of the authors explained how their data shows that healthy prepared food is similarly priced to unhealthy prepared food.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 6:32 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
What a weird niche study. "people in different places have different diets, preferences and local cuisines of varying healthy-ness" wow thank you!

I don't think its any surprise that the deep fried south and meat and potatoes Midwest has less healthy diets than the West Coast and "wealthy" urban areas. This seems fairly self evident to me
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 6:52 PM
Capsicum's Avatar
Capsicum Capsicum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Western Hemisphere
Posts: 1,507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
What a weird niche study. "people in different places have different diets, preferences and local cuisines of varying healthy-ness" wow thank you!

I don't think its any surprise that the deep fried south and meat and potatoes Midwest has less healthy diets than the West Coast and "wealthy" urban areas. This seems fairly self evident to me
And yet the south and midwest have tons of excellent agricultural land for growing a wide variety of things and should in theory be good for local, fresh vegetables and fruit (well, okay, maybe not to the extent that California does, but a lot of the country's produce does come from those regions). After all in the south, Georgia is known as the peach state, there's citrus in places like Florida, and the south is also known for nice, warm-climate fruits like persimmons.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 7:19 PM
James Bond Agent 007's Avatar
James Bond Agent 007 James Bond Agent 007 is offline
Posh
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
Posts: 18,066
These days, since you can buy just about anything, anywhere at any time, I hardly think local crops have much to do with what people eat.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 7:28 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
And yet the south and midwest have tons of excellent agricultural land for growing a wide variety of things and should in theory be good for local, fresh vegetables and fruit (well, okay, maybe not to the extent that California does, but a lot of the country's produce does come from those regions). After all in the south, Georgia is known as the peach state, there's citrus in places like Florida, and the south is also known for nice, warm-climate fruits like persimmons.
As James Bond said it has nothing to do with what they can grow its about what the cultural diet is. The south grows plenty of healthy produce as does the Midwest but that's not the way they eat. They deep fry and eat heavy oily food. In the Midwest they have very central/eastern Europe type of foods, lots of heavy gravy and potatoes and breads and things like that.

The west coast just eats healthier maybe because its warmer, more Mexican influence and Mediterranean type diets. a lot more vegetables and light meals instead of heavy Midwestern food or oily southern food. City people eat healthier probably because its popular and the local influence isn't as heavy.

Its a cultural thing not an access thing.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 10:04 PM
Khantilever Khantilever is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Chicago
Posts: 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
What a weird niche study. "people in different places have different diets, preferences and local cuisines of varying healthy-ness" wow thank you!

I don't think its any surprise that the deep fried south and meat and potatoes Midwest has less healthy diets than the West Coast and "wealthy" urban areas. This seems fairly self evident to me
The article’s title is super click-baity. It is indeed an obvious and well-established empirical fact that food choices vary by location. The question is whether it’s due to lack of options or preferences. The study is not even remotely about showing where food is unhealthy; the article just uses that because people love lists and rankings. (In fact, the article itself acknowledges they used a click-baity title by clarifying that the point of the study is not to show which places eat better or worse than others)

This study is about as policy-relevant as economic research gets. A lot of money and political capital has been spent trying to encourage large grocery stores to open in poor areas. This study is probably the best repudiation of the “food desert” hypothesis - that low-income households eat poorly because they lack access to healthy food. Most other studies had less granular data or involved very small scale experiments, like setting up farmers markets)

And it’s not just a cultural thing; wealthy households in the Midwest eat healthier than poor households in the Midwest.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 11:34 PM
Emprise du Lion Emprise du Lion is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Chicago
Posts: 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
As James Bond said it has nothing to do with what they can grow its about what the cultural diet is. The south grows plenty of healthy produce as does the Midwest but that's not the way they eat. They deep fry and eat heavy oily food. In the Midwest they have very central/eastern Europe type of foods, lots of heavy gravy and potatoes and breads and things like that.

The west coast just eats healthier maybe because its warmer, more Mexican influence and Mediterranean type diets. a lot more vegetables and light meals instead of heavy Midwestern food or oily southern food. City people eat healthier probably because its popular and the local influence isn't as heavy.

Its a cultural thing not an access thing.
Plenty of corn and potatoes in typical dishes, but if anything, the Midwest is meat heavy. Red meat in particular.

The largest concentration of Eastern Europeans is also in Chicagoland with all its Poles. The rest of the Midwest, on average, has substantially less Eastern European influence going on.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 11:41 PM
Capsicum's Avatar
Capsicum Capsicum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Western Hemisphere
Posts: 1,507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emprise du Lion View Post
Plenty of corn and potatoes in typical dishes, but if anything, the Midwest is meat heavy. Red meat in particular.

The largest concentration of Eastern Europeans is also in Chicagoland with all its Poles. The rest of the Midwest, on average, has substantially less Eastern European influence going on.
But there's a lot of German influence though (also Germans who lived in eastern Europe prior to immigrating).
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 11:43 PM
Capsicum's Avatar
Capsicum Capsicum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Western Hemisphere
Posts: 1,507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obadno View Post

The west coast just eats healthier maybe because its warmer, more Mexican influence and Mediterranean type diets. a lot more vegetables and light meals instead of heavy Midwestern food or oily southern food.
I would also add east Asian influence too, alongside the Spanish/Mediterranean/Mexican influence in vegetable and fresh produce choices on the west coast.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2018, 11:52 PM
Emprise du Lion Emprise du Lion is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Chicago
Posts: 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
But there's a lot of German influence though (also Germans who lived in eastern Europe prior to immigrating).
I'd wager that most people with German ancestry in the Midwest did not come from what is now Eastern Europe though. I'd also say the German contribution more so went to the whole meat heavy thing that we have going on.

While popular, the Midwest is not a region that lives or dies on the potato. Just look at the city/regional specific dishes that the Midwest is known for.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 4:36 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.