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Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 11:38 AM
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LIVERPOOL 2017 – Nightsky’s trip to 5 English cities

In early April this year I made a trip to 5 cities: Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds and York. I have already visited London twice so I wanted to see something else, in this case some of the largest cities in England. I flew to Luton from Copenhagen and home from Manchester. I travelled with trains and buses between these cities. The weather was exceptionally fine for early UK spring, with mild weather, no rain and sunny more then half of the time.

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liverpool.html
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Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 11:39 AM
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LIVERPOOL:

Population: 484 000 (metro 2 241 000)
Tallest building: Beetham West Tower (134mm, built 2007)
Founded: 1207, city 1880
Ceremonial county: Merseyside
Region: North West England
Area: 111.8 km² (urban 199.6 km²)
Year visited: April 2017

Liverpool is mostly known for the hometown of The Beatles pop group, industries, monotonous redbrick townhouses and the Liverpool FC football team. But the city with UK:s 5th largest metropolitan area has much more to offer, such as great architecture, amazing free museums, a great waterfront and a hospitable atmosphere. Liverpool is situated about one hour West of Manchester, at the West coast near the Irish Sea, just next to River Mersey, that separates the city from Birkenhead.

There are two huge cathedrals, both situated in the East part of the city centre, linked by Hope Street on Mount Pleasant; the Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, a historical one, and the Metropolitan Cathedral, a futuristic one. The Anglican Cathedral was built in gothic revival style between 1904 and 1978, but looks much older. The tower is 101m tall, making it one of UK:s tallest church buildings, it is also one of the largest cathedrals in the world. It has the largest pipe organ in the UK, and is the longest cathedral in the world, 189m!

The Metropolitan Cathedral was built in 1962-67 in a very modern, futuristic style, in a circular, almost UFO like shape. It is 82m tall and was built in stone, steel and concrete. The vast interior is also completely circular. It is nicked by locals as the "Catholic Cathedral". The architect, Frederick Gibberd, won an international design competition.

Albert Dock and Pier Head is a very nice area in the waterfront, a UNESCO World Heritage Site with many impressive historical buildings as well as new ultramodern buildings. Here you find the port, the The Beatles Statue (with all four members walking), the large and futuristic Museum of Liverpool (that tells the story about the city, the football team, the pop culture and offers panoramic views towards the port), Mersey Ferries and Pierhead with the magnificent imposing white historical buildings called "The Three Graces": Royal Liver Bldg, Port of Liverpool Bldg and Cunard Bldg. The Albert Dock Village, Tate Gallery, Merseyside Maritime Museum, Pump House, Echo Arena, BT Convention Center, Wheel of Liverpool - a modern 60m high ferris wheel and lots of restaurants can also be found at Albert Dock. The most popular museum in Albert Dock, though, is the Beatles Story, a large extensive museum about the band that started the "Merseybeat" sound. In Liverpool's only non free museum you find John Lennon's piano, guitars, full scale copies of the Cavern, Abbey Road Studios, record stores and other clubs, as well as rooms with themes of Seargeant Pepper, an airplane and the Yellow Submarine!

In the middle of the city centre, you find pedestrian streets such as Paradise St, Church St and Lord St, with lots of modern brand stores, department stores, street musicians and restaurants. These streets are surprisingly modern, and features mostly very modern buildings. At Hanover St and Ranelagh St you find the Central Station, and a very popular pub area, with charming historical buildings. Liverpool is known for its many statues of important local people, such as the members of the Beatles.

The Cavern Quarter, around Matthew Street, Button St and Harrington St is an area in the city centre, with small pedestrian streets with pubs dedicated to The Beatles. The original The Cavern Pub, where the Beatles played many times in their heyday, is situated in the area. It is also home to Europe's largest free music festival!

At Derby Square, a busy square where some of the pedestrian streets end, you find the neo-baroque Queen Victoria Monument, featuring 26 bronze figures. Nearby, at the end of Castle Street, is the neo-classical Liverpool Town Hall, and the impressive 11-storey Exchange Flags building from 1939. Between them stands the Nelson Monument (unveiled in 1813), that features statues of men in chains and the inscription "Every man must do his duty". Also the Law Courts, the Exchange Bldg and Mercury Court can be found in this area.

Lime St Station from 1836 is the largest railway station in Liverpool, and the world's largest grand terminus station still in use. This is where we arrived from Manchester in the evening. The station is fronted by the French renaissance style North Western Hotel. Opposite the station you find a square with the imposing St George's Hall, that is one of the world's finest neo-classical buildings and contains concert halls and law courts, the Cenotaph, the neo-classical World Museum, Walker Art Gallery, Empire Theatre, the Wellington Column and the Central Library, another neo-classical building that features a futuristic atrium and a terrace with great views. All these classical public buildings are centered along William Brown Street. Right next is the beautiful St John's Gardens.

St John's Beacon is the high circular observation of the nearby Radio City Tower. The radio tower is 125m tall and was built in 1965. The observation deck is open to public, we shot many of the skyline photos there. The tower stands next to the mall Clayton Square, and Williamson Square, where you find a mall and some nice pubs.

In the North end of the city centre, you find a new Central Business District where a construction of highrises and small skyscrapers have appeared recently, many with interesting shapes. They have all been built in the 2000s, and transformed the skyline of Liverpool. The two tallest buildings are the two Beetham Towers (40 and 27 floors, 2017). A wide boulevard, partly called the Strand, separates the business district from Albert Dock. The historic Our Lady and St Nicholas Church stands along the Strand. It was the tallest building in Liverpool 1813–1868 with its 53m. Large hotels such as the Hilton, Thistle, Mercure, Crowne Plaza and Radisson can be found in the area.
In the Eastermost part is a hilly area around Mt. Pleasant (this is where we stayed). Here you find the campus of Universit of Liverpool, with significant buildings such as the red gothic revival Victoria Building from 1892, that includes the Victoria Gallery & Museum.
The small Chinatown with its impressive gate and Chinese restaurants and stores, is also in the East part. It consists mostly of Nelson St.
Liverpool is a typical British city in many ways, unlike Birmingham for example. It is one of the safest big cities in the UK, but there are many homeless people in the city and you still have to take care after dark.
Liverpool is offering blue decked buses, and several black classical "London taxis", but no subway or trams. The city centre is not very big, and quite walkable with lots of pedestrian streets.
Liverpool has a good nightlife, with lots of pubs and clubs, concentrated to the area around Wood Street, Fleet Street and Concert Square, and Hanover St, Ranelegh St, as well as Albert Dock.
Many places that are known from The Beatles lyrics, such as Penny Lane, can be found in Liverpool. While the city center boasts lots of neo-classical and futuristic buildings, the city's outskirts are known for its neighbourhoods with numberless working class red brick townhouses.
We visited Liverpool for one and a half day. We arrived by train in the late evening after a tour of Birmingham, and left after the second night towards Manchester. Unfortuantely it was grey and very cold during my whole visit, even though it was warmer then usual in early April.
We stayed at the simple Hatters Hostel. A cheap hostel at the Mt Pleasant, a hilly street centrally sitauted at Lime St Station.

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liverpool.html
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Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 11:41 AM
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ALBERT DOCK AND PIER HEAD:
- The Three Graces, The Beatles Statue, Museum of Liverpool, Mersey Ferries, Royal Liver Bldg, Port of Liverpool Bldg, Cunard Bldg, Wheel of Liverpool, Pump House, Echo Arena, Maritime Museum, Strand


The waterfront area of central Liverpool is very nice; it consists of Pier Head and Albert Dock, a UNESCO World Heritage Site with many impressive historical buildings as well as new ultramodern buildings, some tall highrises. Here you find the port, the The Beatles Statue (with all four members walking), an Elvis statue, the large and futuristic Museum of Liverpool (that tells the story about the city, the football team, the pop culture and offers panoramic views towards the port), Mersey Ferries and between Pier Head and the busy Strand street the three magnificent imposing white and beige historical buildings called "The Three Graces": Royal Liver Building from 1911 with its two clock towers, at a height of 98m it was the tallest building in Liverpool for 67 years, one of the world's first reinforced concrete buildings and HQ of Royal Liver assurance company, Port of Liverpool Building from 1907, 67m tall with its cupola (tallest for 4 years) and the lower Cunard Building from 1916, that used to be the headquarters of Cunard Lines shipping company. The Albert Dock Village, Tate Gallery, Merseyside Maritime Museum, Pump House, Albert Dock Traffic Office, Echo Arena, BT Convention Center, Wheel of Liverpool - a modern 60m high ferris wheel, several memorials, statues and lots of restaurants can also be found at Albert Dock. The most popular museum in Albert Dock, though, is the Beatles Story, a large extensive museum about the band that started the "Merseybeat" sound. In Liverpool's only non free museum you find John Lennon's piano, guitars, full scale copies of the Cavern, Abbey Road Studios, record stores and other clubs, as well as rooms with themes of Seargeant Pepper, an airplane and the Yellow Submarine! There is also a high Titanic memorial in Pier Head, as the ill-fated ship was owned by White Star Lines from the city, the ship even had the lines "Titanic Liverpool" written on its sides. Ironically, there was three party boats that could be rented in Albert Dock during our visit; Yellow Submarine, Joker Gotham City and Titanic!

Albert Dock 54 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Skyline from Pier Head
Albert Dock 03 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Royal Liver Bldg from Strand.
Albert Dock 02 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Strand Street.
Albert Dock 01 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Pump House and Dock office.
Albert Dock 50 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Cunard Bldg and Port of Liverpool Bldg.
Albert Dock 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 49 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Albert Dock 46 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Royal Liver Bldg.
Albert Dock 44 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Albert Dock 38 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 36 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 32 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 29 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 30 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liv...lbertdock.html
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Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 11:44 AM
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MORE ALBERT DOCK AND PIER HEAD:

Albert Dock 28 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 27 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 26 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 24 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Princes Dock and Alexandra Tower.
Albert Dock 22 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Port of Liverpool Bldg.
Albert Dock 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr
“The Three Graces” on Pier Head seen from Museum of Liverpool.

Albert Dock 17 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr
The town of Birkenhead on the opposite side.
Albert Dock 14 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower West and Royal Liver Bldg.
Albert Dock 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Museum of Liverpool.
Albert Dock 07 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Port of Liverpool Bldg.
Albert Dock 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Dock 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liv...lbertdock.html
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Old Posted Aug 10, 2017, 11:37 AM
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WILLIAM BROWN STREET, CULTURAL QUARTER, ST JOHN’S GARDENS:
- Central Library, World Museum, Lime Street Station, St George's Hall, Hope Street, Walker Art Gallery, County Session House, Empire Theatre, Wellington Column, Steble Fountain, Britannia Adelphi Hotel, Radio City Tower, Clayton Square, Williamson Square

At William Brown Street there is a large concentration of historical public buildings, in the east part of the city centre. It was named after the philantropist William Brown and is sometimes called the Cultural Quarter.
Lime St Station from 1836 is the largest railway station in Liverpool, and the world's largest grand terminus station still in use. This is where we arrived from Manchester in the evening. The station is fronted by the impressive French renaissance style North Western Hotel. Opposite the station you find a square with the imposing St George's Hall, that is one of the world's finest neo-classical buildings and contains concert halls and law courts. Here you also find the Cenotaph, Walker Art Gallery, Empire Theatre, the Wellington Column, the historical neo-classic County Sessions House from 1884, but most significant of all is the Central Library, another neo-classical building that features a futuristic atrium and a terrace with great views. The building, completed in 1860, was completely modernized inside in 2013, but its historical exterior remains. Part of the same building, that is called William Brown Library and Museum, is also the World Museum. In front of the building stands the black Steble Fountain from 1879 with its sculptures. Right next is the beautiful St John's Gardens with its trees, flowers and fountains. St John's Beacon is the high circular observation deck of the Radio City Tower, situated nearby. The radio tower is 125m tall and was built in 1965. The observation deck is open to public, we shot many of the skyline photos there. The tower stands next to the quite dull mall Clayton Square, and Williamson Square, where you find small older townhouses with pubs and bars. Many of Liverpool's double decked buses, that in contrary to London's are blue (some green and yellow as well), passes by this area. In the part immediately to the East you find many music stores, music bars, pubs and restaurants. Britannia Adelphi Hotel is a large hotel between Lime St and Mt. Pleasant.
St Johns Gardens 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Wellingtons Column 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Johns Gardens 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Johns Gardens 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Johns Gardens 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Johns Gardens 07 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Johns Gardens 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Johns Gardens 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr

St Georges Hall by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Georges Hall 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Lime Street Station 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Lime Street Station 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Lime Street Station 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Lime Street Station 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Lime Street is where I arrived from Birmingham and took the train to Manchester.
http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liverpool_City.html

Central Library and its views 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr

CENTRAL LIBRARY/WORLD MUSEUM AND ITS VIEWS:
Central Library and its views 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 25 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 22 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 21 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 18 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Central Library and its views 16 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 14 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library and its views 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liverpool_City.html
http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liv..._skyline2.html
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Old Posted Aug 10, 2017, 5:10 PM
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Was watching the final episode of the series "Foyle's War" last night. The director said they had filmed in Liverpool because so much of the city looks a lot like London before the modernization kick set in.
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Old Posted Aug 11, 2017, 2:07 PM
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Originally Posted by jg6544 View Post
Was watching the final episode of the series "Foyle's War" last night. The director said they had filmed in Liverpool because so much of the city looks a lot like London before the modernization kick set in.
Interesting fact, but I'm surprised by that. I think there have been lots of modernization in Liverpool as well, especially in the harbour area. I was surprised by that large parts of the central pedestrian streets were filled with mostly quite new, very modern buildings, was expecting a much older overall look. Still, there are a few streets with only old buildings in Liverpool, but aren't there still some in London as well?
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Old Posted Aug 12, 2017, 3:08 PM
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HOPE STREET:
At Hope Street, the street that connects Liverpool's two cathedrals, you find typical townhouses, a sculpture with bags and instruments, and the Liverpool Philharmonic.

Hope Street 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Hope Street 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Hope Street 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Hope Street 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Hope Street 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Hope Street 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Hope Street 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr

CLAYTON SQUARE:
Clayton Square 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Radio City Tower, the tallest structure in Liverpool. You can see my photos from its observation deck later.
WILLIAMSON SQUARE:
Williamson Square 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Williamson Square 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Clayton Square 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Strange to see a Swedish Clas Ohlson store in England!

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liverpool_City.html
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2017, 11:54 AM
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THE CATHEDRALS OF LIVERPOOL:
- Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, Metropolitan Cathedral


There are two huge cathedrals, both situated in the East part of the city centre, linked by Hope Street; the Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, a historical one, and the Metropolitan Cathedral, a futuristic one. An odd fact is that the old looking one was completed 11 years after the futuristic one! Both cathedrals are beautifully illuminated after dark.


METROPOLITAN CATHEDRAL:
The Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King was built in 1962-67 in a very modern, futuristic style, in a circular pyramid, almost UFO like shape. It is 82m tall, 59m in diameter and was built in stone, steel and concrete. The vast interior is also completely circular and is sloping towards a blue dome on the top. It is nicked by locals as the "Catholic Cathedral". The architect, Sir Frederick Gibberd (together with Sir Edwin Lutyens), won an international design competition (there is a large model of one of the other proposals inside the Museum of Liverpool). There are lots of interesting details, like the organ, beautiful lightings, modern paintings and blue mosaic glass. The cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of Liverpool and the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Liverpool. There is a crypt under the Metropolitan Cathedral. You can reach the cathedral with stairs from Hope Street/Mt Pleasant.

Metropolian Cathedral from Radio City Tower 22 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral 18 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral 16 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr

ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL (LIVERPOOL CATHEDRAL):
The Anglican Cathedral, or Liverpool Cathedral, was built in gothic revival style between 1904 and 1978, but looks hundreds of years older. The construction was heavily delayed by the two world wars. The tower is 101m tall, making it one of UK:s tallest church buildings, it is also one of the largest cathedrals in the world, one of the two largest Anglican churches in the world and the 2nd tallest building in Liverpool. The cathedral, situated on St James Mount, was built in red granite style. It is the Church of England Cathedral of the Diocese of Liverpool. The interior, especially the Lady Chapel, is very large. It has the largest pipe organ in the UK, and is the longest cathedral in the world, 189m! The bells are the highest and the heaviest ringing peals in the world, at a heigh of 67m. There is a neo-classical oratory, designed by John Foster, from 1846, with a column, right next to the cathedral.
Anglican Cathedral from Radio City Tower 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Anglican Cathedral 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Anglican Cathedral 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Anglican Cathedral 16 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Anglican Cathedral 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral 22 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Anglican Cathedral 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liv...athedrals.html
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Old Posted Aug 24, 2017, 10:05 AM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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Quote:
Liverpool is offering blue decked buses, and several black classical "London taxis", but no subway or trams.
Liverpool does actually have a small subway system with four underground stations in the city centre plus one over in Birkenhead across the river and lines beyond that extending overground into the suburbs.

It's more useful for people traveling in from the suburbs though, the city centre itself is quite compact and walkable so there isn't really any need to use it if sticking to the city centre.


Last edited by Jonesy55; Aug 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM.
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Old Posted Aug 24, 2017, 2:15 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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By the way, those streets you describe as 'surprisingly modern' are part of the Liverpool One development which was built around 10 years ago. It's a kind of shopping mall built on the site of some old derelict warehouses and other underused buildings, but because they kept the old street pattern for the new development and tried to integrate it very much into the rest of the central retail area it does feel very much just like some regular streets.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liverpool_One
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Old Posted Aug 24, 2017, 4:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonesy55 View Post
By the way, those streets you describe as 'surprisingly modern' are part of the Liverpool One development which was built around 10 years ago. It's a kind of shopping mall built on the site of some old derelict warehouses and other underused buildings, but because they kept the old street pattern for the new development and tried to integrate it very much into the rest of the central retail area it does feel very much just like some regular streets.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liverpool_One
Thanks, have ot update the text on my website about this project. Yes, I was informed about the subway from another Liverpool member on SSC. Anyway, I didn't see it, and no need to use it anyway as the city is very walkable. But good to know anyway.
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Old Posted Aug 24, 2017, 4:31 PM
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RADIO CITY TOWER
- skyline views from St John’s Beacon:

St John's Beacon is the high circular observation of Radio City Tower, Liverpool's second tallest tower (tallest if you count the antenna). The radio tower is 125m tall to the roof, 148m to the top of the antenna, and was built in 1965. It is situated in the heart of the city centre, right next to Clayton Square, Williamson Square and Lime Street Station. The observation deck is open to public, so it is the best spot to watch Liverpool from above and take photos. 1969-99 there was a revolving restaurant in St John's Beacon. The tower stands next to Clayton Square, where you find a mall and some nice pubs.

Besides Radio City Tower, Liverpool's skyline consist of the historical Liverpool Cathedral (101m), the futuristic Metropolitan Cathedral (82m) and in Albert Dock you find the "Three Graces", 3 significant beautiful landmark buildings in Albert Dock; Royal Liver Building from 1911 is the tallest (99m) and most famous one. Port of Liverpool Building and Cunard Building are the other ones. In Albert Dock you also find the 60m high ferris wheel Liverpool Wheel.

The skyline of Liverpool has been booming recently. In the North end of the city centre, you find a new Central Business District (CBD) where a construction of highrises and small skyscrapers have appeared recently, many with interesting shapes. They have all been built in the 2000s, and transformed the skyline of Liverpool. The tallest buildings are the Beetham Tower West from 2007 (40 floors, Liverpool's tallest building) and Beetham Tower from 2004 (27 floors). Alexandra Tower, Unity Residential and 1 Princes Dock are other significant residential highrises from the mid 2000s in the area, and New Hall Place is an older terracotta coloured building from 1974. A wide boulevard, partly called the Strand, separates the business district from Albert Dock. The historic Our Lady and St Nicholas Church stands along the Strand. SkyHaus, two twin 29-storey residential towers, are u/c and will be among the 3 tallest buildings in the city.

In the outskrirts you find lots of ugly 60s modernist so called "commie blocks" with around 15 floors each.
St Johns Beacon, Radio City Tower 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Johns Beacon, Radio City Tower 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr


Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 41 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 39 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 36 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 34 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 32 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 31 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 30 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 29 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 28 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 27 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 26 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 25 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 23 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 22 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 21 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool skyline from Radio City Tower 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liverpool_skyline.html
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  #15  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2017, 3:13 PM
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CAVERN QUARTER:
- Matthew Street, The Beatles area, The Cavern, Button St, Harrington St, Hard Days Night Hotel

The Cavern Quarter, around Matthew Street, Button St and Harrington St is an area in the city centre, with small pedestrian streets with pubs dedicated to The Beatles. The original The Cavern Pub, where the Beatles played many times in their heyday, is situated in the area. It is also home to Europe's largest free music festival, International Beatle Week! You find bars with names like Rubber Soul, White Star, The Tube and the wellknown Eric's here. The statue of John Lennon is also a very popular tourist attraction. At N John St, that borders the area, you find the Hard Day’s Night Hotel, that is the world’s only Beatles inspired hotel.
Cavern Quarter 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Cavern Quarter 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Cavern Quarter 35 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 34 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Cavern Quarter 33 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 32 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 31 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 27 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Cavern Quarter 23 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 22 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 17 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Cavern Quarter 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Cavern Quarter 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Cavern Quarter 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Cavern Quarter 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 07 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Cavern Quarter 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liverpool_Cavern.html
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  #16  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2017, 9:45 PM
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CBD (Central Business District), CITY CENTRE NORTH:
- Beetham Tower West, Beetham Tower, The Strand, Beetham Towers, Nelson Monument, Exchange Flags, Our Lady and St Nicholas Church, Princess Dock, Castle Street, Dale Street, Old Hall Street

In the North end of the city centre, you find a new Central Business District (CBD) where a construction of highrises and small skyscrapers have appeared recently, many with interesting shapes. They have all been built in the 2000s, and transformed the skyline of Liverpool. The tallest buildings are the Beetham Tower West from 2007 (40 floors, Liverpool's tallest building) and Beetham Tower from 2004 (27 floors). Alexandra Tower, Unity Residential and 1 Princes Dock are other significant residential highrises from the mid 2000s in the area, and New Hall Place is an older terracotta coloured building from 1974. A wide boulevard, partly called the Strand, separates the business district from Albert Dock. The historic Our Lady and St Nicholas Church stands along the Strand. It was the tallest building in Liverpool 1813–1868 with its 53m. Large hotels such as the Hilton, Thistle, Mercure, Crowne Plaza and Radisson can be found in the area.
Just to the South of the modern office tower you find some historical buildings; the Town Hall (see this section), some other buildings and the 11-storey Exchange Flags building from 1939. Between them stands the Nelson Monument (unveiled in 1813), that features statues of men in chains and the inscription "Every man must do his duty". Also the Law Courts, the Exchange Bldg and Mercury Court can be found in this area. The busy Dale Street goes to the East and features some imposing beautiful historical municipal buildings. Old Hall St goes towards Beetham West Tower and on Castle Street you find more historical buildings.


City centre North, CBD 21 by Nightsky, on Flickr
City centre North, CBD 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr
City centre North, CBD 18 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower West (Radisson Hotel), Liverpool’s tallest skyscraper.

City centre North, CBD 16 by Nightsky, on Flickr
1 Princes Dock
City centre North, CBD 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr
City centre North, CBD 14 by Nightsky, on Flickr
City centre North, CBD 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower

City centre North, CBD 07 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall with Nelson Monument.
City centre North, CBD 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Nelson Monument.
City centre North, CBD 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Municipal buildings on Dale St.
City centre North, CBD 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
City centre North, CBD 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Castle St
City centre North, CBD 32 by Nightsky, on Flickr
City centre North, CBD 28 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Alexandra Tower, Princess Dock
City centre North, CBD 26 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Nicholas Church
City centre North, CBD 23 by Nightsky, on Flickr
City centre North, CBD 22 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower West and East.

City centre North, CBD 25 by Nightsky, on Flickr
City centre North, CBD 24 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower West (Radisson Hotel), Liverpool’s tallest skyscraper.

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liverpool_CBD.html
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  #17  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2017, 11:42 AM
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Thanks for the tour!

It appears that so many of the streets seem so deserted, where are all the people? And I realize that Liverpool is a lot smaller than London.

I haven't been to Liverpool since 1985.
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  #18  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2017, 9:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IMBY View Post
Thanks for the tour!

It appears that so many of the streets seem so deserted, where are all the people? And I realize that Liverpool is a lot smaller than London.

I haven't been to Liverpool since 1985.
It was really windy and cold these two days, I don't know how it is when the weather is better. But there were lots of people on the pedestrian streets, despite the weather, that will be shown later. The pictures from the Beatles quarters were taken early on a thursday morning.
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  #19  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2017, 1:41 PM
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DERBY SQUARE AND PEDESTRIAN STREETS:
- Victoria Monument, Town Hall, Paradise Street, Castle St, Church Street, Peter's Lane, Waterstone's

Liverpool has lots of pedestrian streets in the heart of the city center, a mecca for the shopping lover. They are surprisingly modern, and features mostly modern buildings. This is much because of a partly outdoor shopping, residential and leisure complex called Liverpool 1, that opened in 2008 with 169 stores, and anchored by Debenhams (a department store building with coloured stripes) and John Lewis (a circular glass building). Waterstone's book store is also significant with its sharp angles. It also has a 14-screen Odeon cinema and a 36-hole golf centre. Paradise St, Church St, Castle St and Lord St are some of the most important shopping streets in the city centre. Here you find modern brand stores, shopping malls and resaurants. At the end of Lord St, Derby Square is situated. Here find the neo-baroque Queen Victoria Monument, featuring 26 bronze figures by CJ Allen. In the cente is a statue of Queen Victoria. Nearby, at the end of Castle Street, at High St, is the neo-classical Liverpool Town Hall with its dome. It was built in 1754 and rebuilt in 1802. The building has an outstanding interior, featuring one of the 3 finest Georgian chandeliers in Europe.

Derby Square 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Derby Square 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Derby Square 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Derby Square 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Derby Square 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Derby Square 07 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Derby Square 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Derby Square 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Derby Square 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Derby Square 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Derby Square 17 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Pedestrian streets, city centre 18 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Pedestrian streets, city centre 17 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Pedestrian streets, city centre 14 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Pedestrian streets, city centre 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Pedestrian streets, city centre 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Pedestrian streets, city centre 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Pedestrian streets, city centre 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Pedestrian streets, city centre 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Pedestrian streets, city centre 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Pedestrian streets, city centre 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liverpool_Derby.html
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  #20  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 10:15 PM
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CHINATOWN:
- Nelson Street, Berry Street, Chinese Gate, Black-E Bldg

Liverpool's Chinatown is situated in the Southast part of the city centre, and is mostly concentrated to Nelson Street, where you find the big Chinese Arch, so called paifang. It was built in Shanghai and was shipped to Liverpool's Chinatown in 2000. Black-E Bldg, the former chapel on Great George St, can be found right next to the gate. Along Berry St, there is also a large concentration of Asian restaurants. Many Chinese immigrants arrived in Liverpool by boat in the 1860s. Today you find Chinese restaurants and supermarkets in the area. The original Chinatown was situated in the docks, but after the heavy bombings of WWII it was relocated to the current spot near the Anglican Cathedral.

Chinatown, Liverpool 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Chinatown, Liverpool 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Chinatown, Liverpool 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Chinatown, Liverpool 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Chinatown, Liverpool 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown, Liverpool 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Chinatown, Liverpool 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Chinatown, Liverpool 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Liv...Chinatown.html
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