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  #461  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 4:51 PM
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Are the Ottawa Senators (finally) going with the O?
Sometime in late July, the Senators organization quietly changed the logo in much of their official material from the unpopular ‘Senturion’ to the throwback mark.

Metro News
Published on Mon Aug 07 2017




The Ottawa Senators appear to be quietly moving away from the centurion logo (known among fans, with a mixture of affection and derision, as the “Senturion”) that they have used since they rejoined the NHL in 1992.

Over the weekend, fans (and a blogger at Silver Seven Sens) noticed changes being made to the organization’s branding. The main logo for the team’s website was changed to the heritage O—a logo that since 2011 has been the main feature on the Senators’ alternate jerseys.

Others pointed out that the same change had been made in the organization’s promotional emails, as well as to the centre-ice logo on the Canadian Tire Centre’s seating chart.

What’s more, the Belleville Senators—Ottawa’s new AHL affiliate team, starting in 2017—unveiled a new logo at the end of July, also moving away from the Senturion theme to a “heritage B,” a variation on the O.

“The Senturion is a perfectly predictable corporate mascot,” said Patrick Clark, a New York-based designer (and New York Rangers fan). “On the other hand, the Heritage O uses the most powerful and controversial colour pairings human history has to offer (black and red) that for better or worse inspire loyalty. … Add an ‘O’ for Ottawa and you’ve got a ready-made battle flag for your team or city to rally to.”

In March, the team’s CEO, Tom Anselmi, mused in an interview with Postmedia that the team might move toward adopting the heritage O logo, saying “that jersey has inspired a lot of people.”
On Twitter, fans have taken to using the hashtag #GoWithTheO to express support for the heritage O.

The Ottawa Senators declined Metro’s request for comment.

While the Senators have largely removed the Senturion from their online branding, it is likely not gone for good quite yet — this year’s new official Adidas jerseys, unveiled at the end of June, still featured the old logo.

http://www.metronews.ca/sports/2017/...ith-the-o.html
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  #462  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 5:27 PM
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A sensible move. The surplus centurion costumes from Caesars Palace never made any sense for a team named after a political assembly.
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  #463  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2017, 10:34 PM
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Former NHL coach, GM Bryan Murray dies at 74 after battle with colon cancer

http://www.ctvnews.ca/sports/former-...ncer-1.3543260
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  #464  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2017, 12:05 AM
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^ Cancer sucks, especially when they catch it at stage 4.
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  #465  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2017, 4:54 PM
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Senators reducing Canadian Tire Centre seating by 1500

Ken Warren, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: September 7, 2017 | Last Updated: September 7, 2017 12:46 PM EDT


When it comes to attendance, the Ottawa Senators are banking on a less is more philosophy.

After a 2016-17 that included far too empty seats – including not selling out for playoff games – the Senators have reduced seating capacity at Canadian Tire Centre to 17,000 from the previous 18,500.

The upper bowl of the arena is now covered with tarps.

“The attendance shifts have been dramatic over a period of two decades,” Senators owner Eugene Melnyk said during a franchise re-branding press conference Thursday. “The whole trend now is less seats and more (in-house club sections), and frankly smaller stadiums.

“When you look at things like a new stadium downtown (at LeBreton Flats), we’re not going to build a 20,000-seat stadium. It will be probably be closer to 15,000-17,000 there.”

The move is dramatic. Melnyk, who was flanked by team president Tom Anselmi during Thursday’s press conference, was clearly embarrassed by the weak attendance figures a year ago.

While neither Melnyk nor Anselmi would provide season ticket numbers, the hope is that the smaller attendance will increase those totals because of the fear that fewer tickets will be available on a walk-up basis.

The Senators have also dramatically increased the presence of the heritage “O” logo throughout the building. The “O” is featured prominently at centre ice, but it will not – at least for now – replace the existing logo.

More to come

kwarren@postmedia.com
Twitter.com/Citizenkwarren

http://ottawacitizen.com/sports/hock...eating-by-1500
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  #466  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2017, 5:14 PM
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This pointing to a growing trend that staying home and watching the game on TV is better. It is a pretty sad reflection on trends in society, that more people don't want to go out and that applies to more than just sports.
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  #467  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2017, 5:21 PM
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Originally Posted by lrt's friend View Post
This pointing to a growing trend that staying home and watching the game on TV is better. It is a pretty sad reflection on trends in society, that more people don't want to go out and that applies to more than just sports.
Hmmm... I would attribute it more to the price point of attending games. Adding in parking and concessions.. I think this type of "entertainment" is starting to price itself out of the market.
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  #468  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2017, 6:17 PM
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Hmmm... I would attribute it more to the price point of attending games. Adding in parking and concessions.. I think this type of "entertainment" is starting to price itself out of the market.
^^^This. It's one thing to willingly pay top dollar for what you can justify as the top level of that sport. It's quite another to have to fork over $15-20 to park your car and $12 for a can of beer that you know costs just more than $2 at your local Beer Store or LCBO
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  #469  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2017, 7:09 PM
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I don't understand why their business model is "sell fewer tickets for more money" as opposed to "sell more tickets for less money and rake in concessions once you've got them in the door," which I think would be even more lucrative in a central, transit-friendly location... But I'm no MBA.

(full disclosure: I watch nearly every game of the season, but on TV, with my PVR, starting 1-2hours late and skipping all the stoppages; if I could buy a subscription from the Senators that allowed me to do the same, I'd happily cut out the Rogers middleman and pay my money directly to the team)
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  #470  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2017, 7:21 PM
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It may be an ok near term move-but tarps? I think Kanata is their number 1 problem. For me it certainly is. I have no desire to drive out there on a weeknight in the winter-none.

They're trying to create demand and "less is more" does work-look at the redblacks. Stadium is 23K? Its all about maximizing revenues but also creating that atmosphere and selling out is a big part of that excitement. When games are sold out, there is an exclusivity to being there, and resulting demand for games.

Kanata in november with a 65% sold out venue? not so much.

It will be impossible to replicate the success of the redblacks attendance in Kanata, but they will do it at lebreton. 15 thousand sounds way to small to me, but 17 thousand does sound right. Nashville is 17K and that building was off the hook during this years playoffs.
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  #471  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2017, 8:39 PM
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Originally Posted by McC View Post
I don't understand why their business model is "sell fewer tickets for more money" as opposed to "sell more tickets for less money and rake in concessions once you've got them in the door," which I think would be even more lucrative in a central, transit-friendly location... But I'm no MBA.

(full disclosure: I watch nearly every game of the season, but on TV, with my PVR, starting 1-2hours late and skipping all the stoppages; if I could buy a subscription from the Senators that allowed me to do the same, I'd happily cut out the Rogers middleman and pay my money directly to the team)
I get your point, but sports marketing these days is all about creating scarcity, so this isn't surprising. To the extent fans can easily get tickets for most games, they won't buy in advance and won't buy season tickets. This will create a risk of not getting tickets, and maybe get people to buy for less popular games earlier. Businesses are also easier to persuade to buy tickets if they will be getting something that isn't easy to get on the market. And a full building also makes for a better atmosphere.

I see commenters on these articles regularly complain about ticket prices. I'm really not sure where those complaints come from. The Sens have long had lots of tickets available for most games for around $25. Not sure how much less one would expect to pay for NHL hockey, as that is not far off an OHL price. Take the bus to the game, which is very easy to do for a big percentage of fans, and you have a very reasonably priced outing.

There isn't really any way to make tickets much cheaper without devaluing the rest of the building. Beer, on the other hand, is just silly.
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  #472  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2017, 12:18 AM
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I get your point, but sports marketing these days is all about creating scarcity, so this isn't surprising. To the extent fans can easily get tickets for most games, they won't buy in advance and won't buy season tickets. This will create a risk of not getting tickets, and maybe get people to buy for less popular games earlier. Businesses are also easier to persuade to buy tickets if they will be getting something that isn't easy to get on the market. And a full building also makes for a better atmosphere.

I see commenters on these articles regularly complain about ticket prices. I'm really not sure where those complaints come from. The Sens have long had lots of tickets available for most games for around $25. Not sure how much less one would expect to pay for NHL hockey, as that is not far off an OHL price. Take the bus to the game, which is very easy to do for a big percentage of fans, and you have a very reasonably priced outing.

There isn't really any way to make tickets much cheaper without devaluing the rest of the building. Beer, on the other hand, is just silly.
Agreed. Scarcity gets people to commit to buying in advance and a full arena or stadium creates a good atmosphere. I think back to the last days of the Rough Riders and looking at all the empty seats at Lansdowne. Everybody was very conscious of how empty the place was. It created the opposite of 'buzz'.
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  #473  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2017, 11:33 AM
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Senators' strategy to create scarcity just might work, experts say

Fewer fans, more fun? As a business strategy, it might actually work for the Ottawa Senators, sports business experts say.

Joanne Laucius, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: September 7, 2017 | Last Updated: September 7, 2017 7:36 PM EDT


Fewer fans, more fun?

As a business strategy, it might actually work for the Ottawa Senators, sports business experts say of the team’s decision to reduce seating capacity at the Canadian Tire Centre from 18,500 to 17,000.

“You can stimulate demand by creating scarcity,” says Michael Mauws, the executive director of the Calgary-based Business of Hockey Institute who also teaches at Athabasca University’s MBA in hockey business. Maybe the Senators have learned something from the Winnipeg Jets, whose home arena, Bell MTS Place, has seating for just over 15,000 fans, the smallest capacity of any NHL arena.

“It seems to have paid off in terms of the environment. It’s always sold out, it’s always noisy,” says Mauws. “People will pay to be part of that environment rather than sit in a half-empty barn. You want to be at an event that others want to be at. When you hear that something is sold out, it exacerbates demand.”

Other teams have used the same strategy. In 2010, the Florida Panthers closed off almost 2,500 seats at the BB&T Center, claiming that the team wanted to create a “more intimate” fan experience.

Last March, the Arizona Coyotes, who had among the lowest attendance in the NHL, announced that the four upper corners of the Gila River Arena would be covered for most homes games this season, reducing seating capacity to 15,869.

“Removing some of this excess inventory and concentrating our great fans closer together represents an opportunity to improve the fan experience,” Coyotes spokesperson Rich Nairn told a reporter last spring.”Part of it is for the perspective of the experience,” says Rodney J. Paul, a sports economist and professor of sports business at Syracuse University.

“In general, when the game is packed and the fans are closer together, they’re more in the zone. You feel like you’re part of a big group. When a game doesn’t sell out, it s a disappointment both for management and for the fans. When the fans look out there and it’s packed, it’s a different atmosphere. It looks more alive.”

Paradoxically, packing in the fans can translate into more revenue for the Senators, says Paul.”They may just be trying to figure out what fans are willing to pay. It’s a hard sell, but they might be thinking that the overall experience might be better.”
Roger Blair, a professor of economics at the University of Florida and author of the textbook Sports Economics, notes that when singer Barbra Streisand gave a farewell tour and there were empty seats, there were two possible explanations — the ticket prices were too high or the venues were too big.In the case of the Senators, the venue may be too big. “Excess inventory” as the Coyotes put it when the team announced that it was cutting back on seats.”They just want to close off those seats because they’re not selling them anyway,” says Blair of Senators owner Eugene Melnyk’s decision to whittle down the number of seats.”What he’s trying to do is configure the size of the arena to what he figures demand for the seats will be. He wants the facility to match up a little bit better to demand. When you see a bunch of empty seats, the suspicion may be that the product is overpriced.” Ottawa’s decision reveals something about the market for the NHL, says Mauws.”The focus seems to be on corporate clients. Ottawa is a government town and doesn’t have those corporate headquarters,” he says. “You can keep on dropping your ticket prices, but, at the end of the day, you have to keep on covering your costs.”

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...rk-experts-say
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  #474  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2017, 1:53 PM
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Hmmm... I would attribute it more to the price point of attending games. Adding in parking and concessions.. I think this type of "entertainment" is starting to price itself out of the market.
I don't buy this argument considering that the seats that weren't selling were the cheapest in the building.
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  #475  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2017, 2:37 PM
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I think attendance problems were for two reasons:

People have grown weary of the drive to Kanata. As Kanata has grown, I am sure traffic has grown worse. For me near the airport, I can count on the drive to take more than an hour on a week night. Transit is possible but takes a similar length of time.

Ottawa fans were not excited by the style of play last year until well in the playoffs. Like most hockey fans, I was expecting them to fall out of contention all season. The fact that they didn't was amazing. Part of this was because of certain players returning to the team late in the season and some shrewd player acquisitions at the trade deadline.

I think Ottawa fans will be more convinced that we have a decent team this year but a lot will depend on the return of Erik Karlsson from his surgery and when this will take place.
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  #476  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2017, 3:34 PM
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I guess the logic here is that if things start looking up again, you can't just increase prices in the middle of the season, but you can remove the tarps and sell more seats.

Seems like a desperate move by a cash-strapped owner.
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  #477  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2017, 3:59 PM
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re: hockey is pricing itself out of the market..

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Originally Posted by bradnixon View Post
I don't buy this argument considering that the seats that weren't selling were the cheapest in the building.
Fair enough... I guess... but then how is the lack of attendance during the playoffs explained?

If it was just the cheap seats not selling out, then it sounds like the best solution is to build a smaller arena and charge at least $100/seat... Would of course put hockey out of reach for the "average" family, but the owners and players would be most happy. Is that really where we want to head?
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  #478  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2017, 6:26 PM
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re: hockey is pricing itself out of the market..



Fair enough... I guess... but then how is the lack of attendance during the playoffs explained?

If it was just the cheap seats not selling out, then it sounds like the best solution is to build a smaller arena and charge at least $100/seat... Would of course put hockey out of reach for the "average" family, but the owners and players would be most happy. Is that really where we want to head?
Far too much was made of that lack of sellouts during the playoff run. The psyche of the average Ottawa fan was that they wouldn't make it out of each successive round but looking strictly at the numbers:

9 home games averaging 18,300=164700 tickets sold. It was about 97% sold out if I remember correctly. Not acceptable to the toronto media and their sheep of course but considering our catchment is about 1.4 million... That's a playoff ticket purchase for every 9 people in this city. It was a long run, some of the lead times for selling was as short as 3 days. It was as much a marketing issue as anything. the criticism was not really fair but the media really wanted to make a story of it.

Still, there is a multi-faceted issue affecting attendance overall. Its not one single thing but mostly comes down to location coupled with demographics of this city-families in a government town. So many people told me "I'd love to go but my kid has hockey practice" or "can't get a sitter"

They will do fantastic when they move downtown, eliminating one major factor affecting attendance. My only concern is how poorly they may do between now and then.

One thing working hugely in Melnyks favour right now is the exchange rate. paying players in US dollars with a 82c dollar is much easier than with a 70c dollar.
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  #479  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2017, 7:28 PM
bradnixon bradnixon is offline
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Originally Posted by HighwayStar View Post
re: hockey is pricing itself out of the market..



Fair enough... I guess... but then how is the lack of attendance during the playoffs explained?

If it was just the cheap seats not selling out, then it sounds like the best solution is to build a smaller arena and charge at least $100/seat... Would of course put hockey out of reach for the "average" family, but the owners and players would be most happy. Is that really where we want to head?
I was at Game 1 vs NYR which was the game with the lowest attendance.

It was exactly these rows that will now be covered that were empty for that game. The more expensive seats lower down were full. I think part of the problem is that you could get better seats on StubHub for cheaper than the box office price for the ones that weren't selling.

By restricting the supply I think they are hoping to limit the flood of cheap tickets on StubHub that are undercutting the box office.
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  #480  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2017, 1:11 AM
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There's yet another article about the senators attendance:

http://ottawacitizen.com/sports/hock...a-e7f0cda423e0

Simple question. Can I buy a ticket package online?

I can buy a $8000 vacation package on Expedia, pay with visa.
I can buy a $6000 TV at best buy online, pay with visa.

Can I, as a new client, go to the sens website and buy a seasons ticket package.

I tried last night, either I am an idiot or they are.
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