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  #901  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 2:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy View Post
It is a nice school, but you'd expect it to be for $230 million.
Wow, that is pretty intense. Even factoring in inflation, it's easily 4-5 times more expensive than Chicago's North Side College Prep (not sure on a /SF basis though).

Here, however, is a nice new LA high school that was constructed for only $13 million (excluding land fees, design fees, etc). http://archrecord.construction.com/p...gh/default.asp

I wonder how they justify spending so much money on a trophy project when other schools only get a fraction of those funds? I'll bet it has to do with saying that it is a citywide school specifically for the arts.
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  #902  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 2:33 AM
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CCDH Office / Ignacio Montaldo Arquitectos
Architects: Ignacio Montaldo Arquitectos / Ignacio Montaldo y Eugenio Ottolenghi
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina

Client: Centro de Consignatarios Directos de Hacienda
Project Year: 2006
Construction Year: 2006-2007
Collaborators: Juan Manuel Munari & Silvia Colomboa
Contractor: Project Management S.A.
Structural Engineering: Pablo Galotto
Lighting: Verónica de la Cruz
Electrical Engineering: Daniel Milito
Services: Eduardo Gamulín
Sun protection: Arq. Laura Dardano
Site Area: 371 sqm
Constructed Area: 740 sqm
Photographs: Daniela Mac Adden
http://www.archdaily.com/10550/ccdh-...o-arquitectos/











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  #903  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 2:34 AM
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CCDH office cont'd











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  #904  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 5:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nowhereman1280 View Post
Seriously though, someone please explain to me why that building is in anyway good architecture?
You're right Nowhereman. When I saw this design the other week I thought it was OMA. That's not a good thing.
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  #905  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 5:18 AM
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Am I the only one who finds the Himmelb(l)au project kind of overwrought? It doesn't look like they've learned from the mistakes of the Akron expansion which was roundly panned...
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  #906  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 5:36 AM
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Wow, I actually really like that one above in Buenos Aires. Whoever thought of constructing a buiding out of (GASP) bricks?
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  #907  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 6:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Ch.G, Ch.G View Post
Am I the only one who finds the Himmelb(l)au project kind of overwrought? It doesn't look like they've learned from the mistakes of the Akron expansion which was roundly panned...

I agree. Their work usually has that quality.

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The building above in Buenos Aires reminds me of the Davis house in Chicago by Vinci-Hamp (c. 2002?). Maybe it is its dental office building cousin?

The photo doesn't show it, but there is a fence with pattern brick in a very similar manner, as I recall.



(Photo by Metroblossom: http://flickr.com/photos/69102971@N00/296162826)
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  #908  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 11:21 AM
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^The huge base of the Madrid TV HQ is needed for the recording studios, especially wheeling the equipment around without having to move floors.

The same can be seen in the Beijing CCTV, one of the most intricate and thought out constructions of late:




1. The seemingly random lines on the facade are actually the stress lines of the structure that are being highlighted.

2. It's the worlds second largest office building (stack its wings on top of each other and it would be 2600ft high).

3. As it stands it is 770ft high, taller than London's Canary Wharf.

4. The colour of the whitened glass is designed to precisely reflect or blend in with the hazy, polluted skies of Beijing.

5. It is designed to be the anti-skyscraper skyscraper - rather than a tall stack of divided floors it becomes a series of
connecting floorplates and sections (see diagram above).

6. It cost an estimated $1.3 billion - and many more times over had it been built elsewhere.






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By rudenoon










Last edited by muppet; Dec 24, 2008 at 11:41 AM.
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  #909  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 12:19 PM
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^ 7. It sure is ugly!
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  #910  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 1:28 PM
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Yeah, what an eyesore!
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  #911  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 3:16 PM
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  #912  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 4:35 PM
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awful
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  #913  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 6:47 PM
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What, the CCTV tower? It's not FANTASTIC, but it is innovative, and I've seen much uglier buildings, there are so many worse options that could have been built.
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  #914  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 10:03 PM
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I think people are just haters. Go CCTV! Build it in Chicago or NY and it's automatically a masterpiece.
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  #915  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Aleks0o01 View Post
I think people are just haters. Go CCTV! Build it in Chicago or NY and it's automatically a masterpiece.
that's because Beijing is like a temple built on an enormous scale & Chicago & New York aren't.

Quote:
Block 16 / René van Zuuk Architekten
Architect: René van Zuuk Architekten
Location: Stadshart Almere, Koetsierbaan, the Netherlands

Client: Ontwikkelingscombinatie Almere Hart c.v
Program: 49 apartments and commercial space
Design Team: René van Zuuk, Kersten Scheller
Project Team: Björn Ophof, Marieke van den Dungen
Structural Ingeneering: Pieters Bouwtechniek Delft b.v.
Project Year: 2005
Site Area: 1,650 sqm
Constructed Area: 8,740 sqm
Photographs: Christian Richters
http://www.archdaily.com/10116/block...k-architekten/











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  #916  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 10:34 PM
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  #917  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 10:37 PM
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  #918  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2008, 4:01 AM
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I've been thinking a lot about High School #9 since seeing those photos and am increasingly frustrated with the architecture and, after reading the below article, the idea behind it. I wish we had some plans/sections available. If you notice, all the photos concentrate on the one lavishly developed entryway, library (?) and theater. However, those two components seem to make up a fraction of the total campus judging by this photo of the model posted on World Architecture News.



I'm not sure I really see how they relate to the rest of the school which looks a bit like an afterthought. In sum, it seems three quarters decorated shed and one quarter "duck." Does it take education in a new direction? Does it provide for an innovative learning environment? No. But I guess it's pretty to look at.
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  #919  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2008, 4:15 AM
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http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...2.story?page=1

Quote:
L.A.'s new arts school an expensive social experiment

The campus has long been intended as a local school, mostly serving students from surrounding neighborhoods. Critics say the district's best resources shouldn't be restricted geographically.

By Mitchell Landsberg

December 22, 2008

With just nine months left before it opens, a new arts high school in downtown Los Angeles still lacks a principal, a staff, a curriculum, a permanent name and a clearly articulated plan for how students will be selected -- critical details for a school that aims to be one of the foremost arts education institutions in the United States.

Central High School No. 9 does have a completed campus, believed to be the second most expensive public high school ever built in the United States. But the very fact that it offers what may be the finest such facilities in the region has fueled a debate over the district's plan to operate it primarily as a neighborhood school, with fewer than one-quarter of its slots allotted to students citywide.

"This school is built to build the potential that exists within this community, in which we have thousands of very talented students but who lack the social capital and the access to quality arts training," said Richard Alonzo, a former art teacher who now has authority over the school as a local district superintendent. By "community," he was referring primarily to the Pico-Union area that lies just west of the school. Alonzo said the school might intentionally discourage the most talented students from outside the surrounding neighborhoods from applying, lest they hog the spotlight.

That has led some people to question whether it's fair to the wider community -- and if it makes sense from an educational standpoint -- to lavish resources on a flagship arts school that is designed primarily for one section of the city.

"I just think that L.A. Unified rushes to mediocrity," said former school board member Caprice Young, who said she thought the goal should be the highest level of performance, regardless of geography. "As a school district, we need to be honoring excellence."

Few will question whether the campus itself is capable of fostering excellence. At a cost of $232 million, it is one of the crown jewels of the Los Angeles Unified School District.

That's clear from the moment you pull into the multilevel, 300-car garage. Up a broad flight of stairs, the campus' main buildings offer three dance studios with sprung maple flooring.

A professional-quality, 950-seat theater. Music classrooms with acoustic tiling and special whiteboards designed for musical notation.

Floor-to-ceiling windows with motorized blackout shades. Ceiling-mounted projectors in every classroom, allowing teachers to display lessons from computers.

Track lighting in the hallways to illuminate student art. An outdoor atrium for firing Japanese raku pottery. And the school's centerpiece, a conical library whose dazzling interior swirls upward to an off-center skylight.

All that, and a tower that looms over the 101 Freeway like a severed limb of the Iron Giant.

But while the school is physically ready to open in the fall, key operational details remain undetermined. An executive director was hired but quit, and now the school is interviewing candidates for principal.

"I'm concerned -- I will use that word," said Ramon C. Cortines, the district's incoming superintendent. Any school needs at least a year of preparation to open successfully, he said, and a specialty arts school may need more.

Alonzo, who has a passionate vision for the school, remains upbeat and insists that any obstacles will be surmounted.

He said he is close to selecting a principal from among three finalists -- two from the East Coast and one from Southern California. And he has apparently beaten back efforts to wrest the campus from district control and turn it into a charter, a public school largely free of district supervision.

He also believes he has settled the debate over whether the campus will be a neighborhood school or one that attracts the most talented students citywide -- an issue that will define the school's identity.

In its early years, at least, 1,200 of the school's 1,700 seats will be reserved for students from the surrounding neighborhoods, primarily the low-income enclaves of Pico-Union and Chinatown, Alonzo said.

The school, whose name is up for sale for $25 million, has a complicated history that speaks to the ethnic and geographic schisms that run through L.A.'s educational politics. It sits at 450 N. Grand Ave., directly across the freeway from the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. The site long served as the school district's headquarters and stands at the northern terminus of the Grand Avenue Project, a multibillion-dollar redevelopment of the city's civic and cultural hub.

The campus was initially conceived as a regular comprehensive high school that would relieve overcrowding at nearby Belmont High, whose partially completed replacement campus was temporarily abandoned because the site was deemed an environmental minefield.

Partly at the urging of philanthropist Eli Broad, the district later decided to turn its old headquarters into a flagship arts school that would anchor Broad's Grand Avenue Project and embrace the major arts institutions within walking distance: the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the L.A. Opera, the Center Theatre Group, the Colburn School of Music and the Museum of Contemporary Art.

The cost of the building, paid largely through school construction bonds, soared once the district decided to make it "world class," district facilities chief Guy Mehula said. Only one other public school in the United States cost more to build -- the Edward Roybal Learning Center. Roybal, about six blocks away, was finished on the abandoned Belmont site after the school board decided it could manage the environmental problems.

The cost of the arts school dwarfs even Roybal if the $190-million cost of moving the district's headquarters and renovating new offices on Beaudry Avenue is included.

No other part of the city is so richly endowed with new schools. Besides Roybal, there is the nearby Miguel Contreras Learning Complex, and [Bt]he area will eventually be served by the new schools being built on the site of the Ambassador Hotel -- which, at a projected $570 million for an elementary, middle and high school, will be the costliest yet[/B].

Former school board member David Tokofsky said he believed the overcrowding problem had been solved, leaving no need for the school to focus on the neighborhood. He said the school should reach out for "talent from Banning [High], from Pacoima, from Huntington Park."

While on the school board, Tokofsky pushed through a compromise that calls for the arts school to be "open to all District students, beginning with a minimum of 500 students from outside the residential area to grow as space permits."

But Alonzo and others insist that the district has, in effect, a social obligation to make up for decades of neglect in the areas just west of downtown.

"For 27, almost 30 years, these kids have had a 65% dropout rate, a very limited outlook for their future," said Maria Casillas, president of a nonprofit foundation that promotes parental involvement in schools and a member of an advisory board established to support the arts high school. "And I don't know that the cost of these buildings actually pays for the pain and suffering that we have created . . . for these kids."

Alonzo said students at the school may not have the most experience in the arts, but they will not suffer for it. For instance, usually in the case of a school play, "The part's going to go to the kid who shows the greatest talent, and that's not the kind of school that this is going to be," Alonzo said. "This is really looking at building potential in communities that have been underserved, for kids that really haven't had the chance."

While the school might tell star performers that they would likely be happier elsewhere, it won't refuse to accept them if they really want to attend, he said.

In part, Alonzo frames the argument for a neighborhood school in economic terms. Los Angeles, he said, offers well-paying jobs to people in the arts, not just as artists and performers but in back-office and blue-collar roles. The new school will help give disadvantaged students entree to those jobs, he said.

Another key issue is how the students are selected.

Los Angeles Unified already has performing-arts programs as part of its magnet system, and those schools are required to take students without regard to talent. The L.A. County High School for the Arts, on the other hand, requires auditions or portfolios of student work.

Alonzo said the new school will steer a middle course, with students required to get a recommendation from a teacher and to demonstrate their interest in attending. They will not, however, be required to demonstrate artistic ability, since many students in the neighborhood never had the opportunity to study an art form.

The students from outside the neighborhood -- 350 the first year, then 500 -- will be selected in the same way, he said.

He said all students will be expected to attend Saturday classes or summer classes at the school "to give us the opportunity to talk to the parents, to talk to the child, to find out is this really the place where you should be coming to school." He said the classes would start next month.

Ariceli Ruano, chief executive of a foundation that helps Latin American children and an active member of the arts school advisory board, said the selection process isn't clear.

"Is it first-come, first-served?" she asked. "I don't know. And with the local students, there's no application that's been developed that I've seen. . . . I don't really understand, and if I don't understand, I don't think it will be very clear to parents."

Directors of some of the district's magnet arts programs have been watching the progress on Grand Avenue with interest, perhaps a bit of jealousy, and some frustration.

David Way, head of the Academy of Music at Hamilton High School, said there was some "institutional concern" about the new school. Given his druthers, he said, he would rather have seen the district put the resources into its existing arts programs.

Still, he said, "I've never worried, lost sleep, over not getting talented kids. There's three-quarters of a million kids in the Los Angeles Unified School District."

Alan Warhaftig, co-director of the visual arts magnet at Fairfax High, said he wished the new school well but would not be "real happy" if it began siphoning off his best students. But he said the school's new campus wouldn't be enough to attract talent, or ensure a successful program.

"It doesn't matter how large and well-equipped your studios are," Warhaftig said. "The education of artists is not about training their hands. It's about training the mind, it's about training the eye."

He added: "To build something that has coherence takes time, and it doesn't matter if it's an arts program or one that's focused on international affairs or medicine. . . . As much as people would like to reduce it to a formula, it's ultimately an art form."

mitchell.landsberg@ latimes.com
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  #920  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2008, 5:41 AM
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It's name is up for sale? What is it, a stadium? Is it going to be called the... "Walgreens School for the Arts"? (I'm using Walgreens because there's a banner ad right above this posting box advertising it.) Kind of strange, though I guess considering the cost of the school, it makes since, though I hope it'll be named after some foundation or something owned by a company, instead of the actual company name itself.
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