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Old Posted Jun 29, 2017, 7:00 PM
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MANCHESTER 2017 – Nightsky’s trip to 5 English cities

In early April this year I made a trip to 5 cities: Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds and York. I have already visited London twice so I wanted to see something else, in this case some of the largest cities in England. I flew to Luton from Copenhagen and home from Manchester. I travelled with trains and buses between these cities. The weather was exceptionally fine for early UK spring, with mild weather, no rain and sunny more then half of the time.

MANCHESTER:

Population: 530 000 (metro 2 794 000)
Tallest building: Beetham Tower (157mm, built 2006)
Founded: 1301, city 1853
Ceremonial county: Greater Manchester
Region: North West England
Autonomous community: Manchester
Area: 115.7 km² (urban 630.3 km²)
Year visited: 2017
Manchester is only United Kingdom's 6th largest city, but it is the 2nd largest urban area in the UK, second only to London, and 3rd largest metropolitan area. It is situated in the mid-west part of England, just East of Liverpool. Manchester is known for its vibrant music scene (the Smiths, Oasis, Joy Division, Stone Roses), famous football teams (Manchester United and Manchester City), several universities an industrial past and its many libraries. The Manchester Ship Canal connects Manchester with the Irish Sea. The River Irwell connects Manchester with the city of Salford. There is a great rivalry between the football teams of Manchester and Liverpool.
Manchester is a great city. There are lots of beautiful historical buildings in gothic, edwardian or victorian style, and the beautiful River Irwell flows through the city center. Santaiago Calatrava's Trinity Bridge is the most modern of the bridges above the river. In the 60s many buildings were constructed in dull modernist style. But many great new modern buildings have been built recently, some with really futuristic architecture. Many of the industrial buildings and warehouses have been into turned to cool buildings. The popular Coronation Street TV show was recorded in Granada Studios in Manchester, now moved to Salford.
There are no less then three large railway stations in central Manchester; Victoria, Piccadilly and Deansgate.
During WWII Manchester was heavily bombed, and in 1996 IRA placed the heaviest bomb in UK history in Arndale Centre, a shopping mall on Corporation St, a truck bomb leading to large destruction and damage of the city centre. Because of evacuations noone was killed, but 200 people were injured! Arndale Centre has been rebuilt and expanded, today it is huge with over 200 stores in several buildings. About only 6 weeks after my visit (May 2017), Manchester suffered from a new terrorist attack; 22 people where killed and 116 injured, many teenagers, when a coward suicide bomber exploded at a concert in the Manchester Arena!
A few modernist skyscrapers have been built in the city centre in the 60s, such as CIS Tower, City Tower and Arndale House. In the 2000s new skyscrapers have been constructed, topped by the 50-storey Beetham Tower, the tallest building in the UK outside London. It is a sleek glass tower built in 2006 with a Hilton hotel and apartments. An even taller one is under construction on Owen St.
Manchester Cathedral is an important gothic church from 1882, situated near the River Irwell. St Ann's Church at St Ann Square is a smaller church.
Market St, Corporation St, Portland St, Piccadilly, Oxford St, Peter St and Church St are some of the most important streets in Manchester's city centre. Deansgate is the longest street in the city centre.
Albert Square and St Peter's Square are the two main squares of the city. Here you find the gothic Town Hall, the neo-classical Central Library, several sculptures and monuments and the Cenotaph.
Piccadilly Gardens is an important park and square, a hub for trams, the 30-storey City Tower highrise and a huge shopping area, around Market Street, begins there. Manchester is really a paradise for shoppers; There are many large modern department stores and malls in the city center, such as Arndale, Selfridge's, Debenhams, Harvey Nichols, Mark&Spencer, House of Fraser, Next and more. There are also small nice speciality stores and second hand stores.
At Exchange Square you find the former Corn Exchange, the gothic Cathedral, the charming timberhouse pub Old Wellington, the futuristic National Football Museum glass building, several modern department stores and Printworks.
The Printworks is a former industrial building that was turned into a really nice entertainment and restaurants complex, with neon lights and high dark passages that make it looks like night, even daytime. Here you find UK:s largest Hard Rock Café.
Chinatown is the 2nd largest in the UK, and the 3rd largest in Europe. It is situated in the city centre, with a Chinese gate at Faulkner Street. Canal Street is a nice area around the canal (that we didn't visit though), counted as a gay area.
John Ryland Library at Deansgate is a historical library, very dark beautiful gothic building, that is open to public. It is said to have inspired the Hogwarts school in Harry Potter. Chetham's Library is the place where Marx and Engels wrote the communist manifesto.
Northern Quarter is a former gritty, gentrified cultural neighbourhood, just North of Piccadily Gardens. Today you find a lot of pubs, bars, nightclubs and record stores. Stephenson Square and the bazaar Afflek's Palace can be found here.
In the Castlefield area, the ancient Roman fort Mamucium can be found.
Salford is a suburb and midsized city with 246 000 inhabitants. Here you find the MediaCityUK with modern highrises, futuristic bridges, Salford Quays and the BBC studios. There are lots of highrises in Salford.
In the suburb of Trafford you find the futuristic Imperial War Museum by Daniel Liebeskind, and the Old Trafford, Manchester United's famous home arena, also UK:s largest club stadium.
Manchester Airport, 13.9km southwest of the city centre, is UK:s busiest airport outside of London. It has no less then 3 terminals.
We visited Manchester for one day, and one morning, after Liverpool and before Leeds. The weather was quite grey during my visit, but not very cold. We enjoyed the vibrant cultural scene, such as the mix of modern and historic architecture, the transformation from industrial to a modern university city and the free museums. It was cloudy during the whole visit to Manchester, but at least it didn't rain.
We stayed at the simple Hatters Hostel on Newton Street, near Piccadilly Gardens and Northern Quarter. So the location was really good, but sleeping on the 5th floor without an elevator was simply too much.

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Manchester.html
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Old Posted Jun 29, 2017, 7:01 PM
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ALBERT SQUARE AND ST PETER’S SQUARE:
- Town Hall, Central Library,Cenotaph, Midland Hotel, Art Gallery, Albert Memorial


In the heart of Manchester, you find two major squares; Albert Square and St Peter's Square. Between them is the victorian neo-gothic Manchester Town Hall, one of the most important landmarks of Manchester. This beautiful Grade 1 listed town hall was built 1868-77, is open to public and features exhibitions and a café in its basement. The main exterior of the Town Hall, designed by Alfred Waterhouse, is facing Albert Square, where you also find the gothic revival Albert Memorial, and a fountain erected for the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria. Albert Square was named after Prince Albert.

St Peter's Square, at Peter St and Princess St, is where you find the Manchester Central Library, a neoclassical round building with a domed top, inspired by Pantheon in Rome. It opened in 1934 and was renovated 2010-14, and now has glass elevators. The entrance hall is called the Shakespeare Hall. You also find the Town Hall extension, Manchester Cenotaph (a World War I memorial from 1924) and the Midland Hotel, an edwardian baroque red stone building from 1903. This is where the founders of Rolls-Royce first met. At St Peter's Square, that was named after a church that was demolished in 1907, you also find several tram lines here (Manchester has modern yellow trams) and new very modern midrise office buildings.

ST PETER SQUARE:
St Peters Square 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr http://<br /> <br /> <a href="http...er_Albert.html
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Old Posted Jun 29, 2017, 7:03 PM
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MORE ST PETER'S SQUARE:

St Peters Square 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr

St Peters Square 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr

St Peters Square 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 07 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr

St Peters Square 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 16 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 17 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 18 by Nightsky, on Flickr
The Town Hall.
Albert Square 58 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Square 59 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library, St Peters Square 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library, St Peters Square 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library, St Peters Square 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Central Library, St Peters Square 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library, St Peters Square 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library, St Peters Square 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library, St Peters Square 07 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library, St Peters Square 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Central Library, St Peters Square 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Midland Hotel, St Peters Square 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Midland Hotel.
Midland Hotel, St Peters Square 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Manchester_Albert.html[/url]
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Old Posted Jun 29, 2017, 7:05 PM
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ALBERT SQUARE:

Albert Square 38 by Nightsky, on Flickr
St Peters Square 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Square 39 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Square 43 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, Albert Square 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Albert Square 44 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Square 45 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Albert Square 47 by Nightsky, on Flickr
The taxis are same as in London.
Albert Square 54 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall.
Albert Square 56 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, Albert Square 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, Albert Square 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, Albert Square 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, Albert Square 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, Albert Square 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, Albert Square 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, interior 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, interior 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Town Hall, interior 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Manchester_Albert.html[/url]
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  #5  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2017, 7:16 PM
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Wow, Manchester has a real grandeur to it. Beautiful city and pics.
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  #6  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2017, 10:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdawg View Post
Wow, Manchester has a real grandeur to it. Beautiful city and pics.
Thanks, tdawg! This is just the beginning of the thread.
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Old Posted Jun 29, 2017, 10:59 PM
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BEETHAM TOWER AND DEANSGATE:
- Deansgate Station, Museum of Science and Industry, White Lion, Liverpool Rd

Deansgate is the longest road in Manchester's city centre, and one of the oldest. Here you find the Deansgate railway station, a redbrick station with elevated platforms and the 50-storey Beetham Tower, which the tallest building in the UK outside London. It is a sleek glass tower built in 2006 with a Hilton hotel, a skybar and apartments. Beetham Tower is one of the thinnest skyscrapers in the world. The architect, Ian Thompson, lives on the top-floor penthouse, that is the highest living space in the United Kingdom. An even taller skyscraper is under construction on Owen St (2017). On the nearby Liverpool Road you find the Museum of Science and Industry, and several nice, really old British pubs.

Beetham Tower 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Beetham Tower, Deansgate by Nightsky, on Flickr
Deansgate 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Deansgate 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Deansgate 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Deansgate 14 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Deansgate 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Deansgate 18 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Deansgate 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Deansgate 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Rd 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Rd 02 - White Lion by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Rd 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Rd 07 - White Lion by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Rd 08 - White Lion by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Rd 09 - White Lion by Nightsky, on Flickr
Liverpool Rd 10 - White Lion by Nightsky, on Flickr
White Lion, one of the oldest Manchester pubs.
Museum of Science and Industry by Nightsky, on Flickr
Museum of Science, Beetham tower by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Manchester_Deansgate.html[/url]
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Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 2:54 PM
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CHINATOWN:

Chinatown is the 2nd largest in the UK, and the 3rd largest in Europe. Still, it is only a few blocks large. It is situated in the city centre, near Albert Square and Piccadilly Gardens. Chinatown is centered around Faulkner St where it features a Chinese gate, and of course you find Chinese speciality stores, bakeries, banks and restaurants here. Also Thai, Japanese, Nepali, Vietnamese, Singaporean and Malaysian stores and restaurants can be found here, as well as Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art. The first Chinese settlers arrived in the early 20th century.
Manchester Chinatown 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Manchester Chinatown 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Manchester Chinatown 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Manchester Chinatown 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Manchester Chinatown 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Manchester_Chinatown.html[/url]
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Old Posted Jul 5, 2017, 1:32 AM
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Very gothic, in other word...depressing.
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Old Posted Jul 8, 2017, 1:21 PM
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EXCHANGE SQUARE:

Around Exchange Square in the heart of Manchester, you find the former Corn Exchange, the gothic Cathedral, the charming timberhouse pub Old Wellington, the futuristic National Football Museum glass building, several modern department stores (Selfridge's, Debenhams, Harvey Nichols, Mark&Spencer, House of Fraser, Next) and Printworks. Printworks is a former industrial building that was turned into a really nice entertainment and restaurants complex, with neon lights and high dark passages that make it looks like night, even daytime. Here you find UK:s largest Hard Rock Café. The area around Exchange Square is sometimes called the Millennium Quarter.
Exchange Bldg, Exchange Square 06 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Royal Exchange Theatre, Exchange Square by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester City Centre 29 - Cathedral by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester City Centre 30 - Corn Exchange by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester City Centre 31 - Next by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester City Centre 32 - Selfridges by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester City Centre 33 - New Cathedral Street by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester City Centre 34 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester City Centre 35 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester City Centre 41 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Arndale, Exchange Square by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Exchange Square 01 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Exchange Square 02 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Exchange Square 03 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Exchange Square 09 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Exchange Square 10 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Exchange Square 12 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Exchange Square 16 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

National Football Museum 01 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
National Football Museum 03 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
The Old Wellington, Exchange Square 01 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
The Old Wellington, Exchange Square 02 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

The Old Wellington, Exchange Square 04 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Manchester_Center.html[/url]
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Old Posted Jul 8, 2017, 1:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murphy de la Sucre View Post
Very gothic, in other word...depressing.
I like that! A very down to Earth, yet very beautiful city with amazing buildings. And so much entertainment, pubs, music shopping etc that prevents depression. I'm sure Manchester looks even greater when the sun is shining.
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Old Posted Jul 8, 2017, 11:41 PM
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Yeah, Gothic is a good thing in my book. Looks like the weather wasn't the best, but the city looks really interesting and lively. I'm thinking Manchester is the better of the two cities (vs. Birmingham), am I right?
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Old Posted Jul 9, 2017, 9:25 PM
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keep up with these threads. i love seeing these secondary cities in the uk (and other places).
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Old Posted Jul 9, 2017, 9:54 PM
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I'm thinking Manchester is the better of the two cities (vs. Birmingham), am I right?
You are getting into very controversial territory there!
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Old Posted Jul 10, 2017, 12:27 PM
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You are getting into very controversial territory there!
Uh oh. Forget I asked!

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Old Posted Jul 11, 2017, 1:10 AM
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Tres nice collection.
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Old Posted Jul 17, 2017, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driver8 View Post
Yeah, Gothic is a good thing in my book. Looks like the weather wasn't the best, but the city looks really interesting and lively. I'm thinking Manchester is the better of the two cities (vs. Birmingham), am I right?
Hard to say. Of the cities I visited I liked Leeds and York the best, to be honest. May be I was affected by the weather, but I found these two cities extremely hospitable and beautiful. Liverpool had extremly grey and cold, but the architecture and pubs were great! Birmingham had amazing architecture and looked like a cool American city, while Manchester was a bit like London so I can't chose between these two, great cities as well!
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Old Posted Jul 17, 2017, 12:38 PM
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MANCHESTER CATHEDRAL:

Manchester Cathedral is an important gothic cathedral from 1421-1882, situated near the River Irwell, that flows through the city. This sandstone and limestone building is the city's parish church. The interior is dark, and not especially large for a cathedral. St Ann's Church at St Ann Square is a smaller church. Here you find a couple of nice historical buildings.
Manchester Cathedral 01 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Manchester Cathedral 02 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester Cathedral 03 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester Cathedral 04 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester Cathedral 05 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester Cathedral 06 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester Cathedral 07 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester Cathedral 08 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Manchester Cathedral 09 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Manchester_Center.html[/url]
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Old Posted Aug 1, 2017, 8:25 PM
FutureNorthEnder FutureNorthEnder is offline
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Lived in Manchester as a small child, but don't remember it. I'm sure it's much nicer now than it was then. At least, your lovely pictures make it seem so.
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Old Posted Aug 7, 2017, 12:36 AM
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Lived in Manchester as a small child, but don't remember it. I'm sure it's much nicer now than it was then. At least, your lovely pictures make it seem so.
Thank you very much, very kind. Yes, its quite modern today and has vibrant feel with lots of entertainment and nice buildings.
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