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  #1981  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 6:34 AM
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Here is an example of what you will find in cities like Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, and Edmonton:


This is my picture of Winnipeg.

The thing that sets Winnipeg a part is the sure number of mature Elm trees that it has. Literally every neighbourhood, except for one, that is not a recent subdivision looks like this. Regina, Saskatoon and Edmonton have this as well, but the difference is that in Winnipeg it is harder to find a neighbourhood without canopies like this than it is to find one with it.

Don't get me wrong though, I have seen what Dutch Elm can do, and my greatest fear is that the lack of effort that the city puts into keeping and replanting a proper canopy will leave it like a lot of Eastern cities that have already lost their Canopies.
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  #1982  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 7:04 AM
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That looks gorgeous!

A few areas in the western side in Calgary are like that too. I'll try to get a pic of my street tomorrow, but my cam is quite shitty.
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  #1983  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 7:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisallard5454 View Post
What you say may be true, but the question is, was your comment necessary? The first thing that popped into my head regarding your response was "Why say that?"

He is proud about his city's canopy, so why post about how it is simply average, in a context that contradicts how it is something to be loved? Roccerfeller, explained the uniqueness behind Winnipeg's Elm Canopy, and it is really something that we, as Winnipeggers can be proud of.

I have seen what other cities have to offer in terms of canopy, and you are right they are all beautiful, but I feel the same as Shinook in that Winnipeg's is somehow unique. It can't be explained.

Regina, Saskatoon, and Edmonton have beautiful Canopies as well. So do the other cities.

In terms of sheer size of Elm coverage though, no city is like Winnipeg, which has the largest urban population of mature Elms.
Probably didn't need to be said, but I mostly said it because it got me thinking that a lot of Canadian cities can be proud of their urban tree canopies, especially when some of those cities were developed on flat treeless parts of the country (Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, etc - don't know enough about the topography of Eastern Canada to know where it could be true there). And nowhere did I say it was average, just that many of us can be proud of our cities' canopies (as displayed by many of the photos in this thread).

And it makes sense that Winnipeg would have the largest stock of Elms, it was the largest city in western Canada during the era when the plantation of Elms was done almost exclusively of all other tree species. It makes for a great look, specifically for the reason they were planted, huge canopies with more minimal lower foliage, but also lead to the devastation of Eastern North America's similar canopies.

In any case, I didn't realize it would be so controversial to point out that it is something many of our cities got right... Similar to how when someone says that Halifax, Regina, Calgary, or Winnipeg (among others) have good/great skylines for cities of their size, someone usually says, "it's something that Canada in general does well". I'll keep my eye out for similar such comments in future and ensure they are pointed out as being insulting toward the city, whose original photo/comment sparked the extra discussion. I'll also avoid discussions about Winnipeg as apparently anything that is a shared quality or some similarity with other Canadian cities steals Winnipeg's thunder and is automatically a debbie downer comment. (This probably also didn't need to be said, but I'm not feeling pariticularly cordial after Shinook's little tantrum - here and through PM).

----

One quick question if I may though... Does the Manitoba gov't do much to take out and destroy infected trees surrounding Winnipeg? There was a bit of talk here a while ago that the RMs around Regina and Saskatoon aren't really getting much support from the province and so many trees are not being cleared out, making the odds of Dutch Elm Disease striking Stoon and Regina with more than just a few infected trees every year increase greatly. And it also makes me wonder if it's only a matter of time before the canopies of Western Canada also disappear.
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  #1984  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 1:47 PM
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Originally Posted by bolognium View Post
needs more trees

Nice one! From Scenic View Park in Byron right? That's a great place to admire the skyline from a distance.
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  #1985  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 2:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinook View Post
So I guess what people are trying to brainwash me into believeing is that anytime I make a positive comment about my city (not anyone elses, just mine) I'm going to be continually told that "it's just like everywhere else", you know, so don't bother saying it cause it really doesn't mean anything.

Yeah, I'm not going to buy into that malarchy. I'll say what I want despite the debbie downers, thanks.

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  #1986  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 2:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathan View Post
Probably didn't need to be said, but I mostly said it because it got me thinking that a lot of Canadian cities can be proud of their urban tree canopies, especially when some of those cities were developed on flat treeless parts of the country (Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, etc - don't know enough about the topography of Eastern Canada to know where it could be true there). And nowhere did I say it was average, just that many of us can be proud of our cities' canopies (as displayed by many of the photos in this thread).

And it makes sense that Winnipeg would have the largest stock of Elms, it was the largest city in western Canada during the era when the plantation of Elms was done almost exclusively of all other tree species. It makes for a great look, specifically for the reason they were planted, huge canopies with more minimal lower foliage, but also lead to the devastation of Eastern North America's similar canopies.

In any case, I didn't realize it would be so controversial to point out that it is something many of our cities got right... Similar to how when someone says that Halifax, Regina, Calgary, or Winnipeg (among others) have good/great skylines for cities of their size, someone usually says, "it's something that Canada in general does well". I'll keep my eye out for similar such comments in future and ensure they are pointed out as being insulting toward the city, whose original photo/comment sparked the extra discussion. I'll also avoid discussions about Winnipeg as apparently anything that is a shared quality or some similarity with other Canadian cities steals Winnipeg's thunder and is automatically a debbie downer comment. (This probably also didn't need to be said, but I'm not feeling pariticularly cordial after Shinook's little tantrum - here and through PM).

----

One quick question if I may though... Does the Manitoba gov't do much to take out and destroy infected trees surrounding Winnipeg? There was a bit of talk here a while ago that the RMs around Regina and Saskatoon aren't really getting much support from the province and so many trees are not being cleared out, making the odds of Dutch Elm Disease striking Stoon and Regina with more than just a few infected trees every year increase greatly. And it also makes me wonder if it's only a matter of time before the canopies of Western Canada also disappear.
Honestly there is nothing wrong with what you said. It just seems there could have been an appropriate time to say it. Shinook is very defensive of his city, and can be overly aggressive about it, taking things out of context. Looking back at it, I can see how your comment could be taken either way, and seeing as how Shinook was exclaiming pride, it could have came out as a bit of a negative response to his post, in that he potentially shouldn't be proud of something that is so common. I didn't personally take it like that, but am just explaining how he could have. I have to say though, if in response to his post you had said, "It is something Canada does well", there would be no room for misinterpretation.

People from Winnipeg are used to others bashing it, so they can become overly defensive. They take the rare opportunity to show pride in there city and it is usually shoved back in their faces. I am not at all saying you did that, because you didn't, but Winnipegger's can have a chip on their shoulders.

I definitely agree with you though, Canada in general has something to be proud of in terms of how extensive its canopies are.

In regards to the province, they have always contributed, but as of this year City Council put a budget on the table where they would each pay an equal portion towards Elm Treatment, protection, etc. The province, I believed agreed to it. That was a huge step forward for the city, because it literally resulted in double the funding for the program. Prior to the new funding Winnipeg had (still has) a net loss of between 1000-2000 trees a year. It is really quite sad. There is also the Emerald Ash Borer, and the Oak tree is affected as well. I personally feel that the city should have a 1 for 1 program, where for every felled tree, 1 is replaced. Unfortunately, among other things, some people don't like having to rake leaves in the fall, and actually prefer their yards once the tree dies, so a lot of the time the tree is not replaced.
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  #1987  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 3:00 PM
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Interestingly, people don't understand that a tree can increase your property value by quite a lot.
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  #1988  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 5:41 PM
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It absolutely can. That's why houses in older neighborhoods go for more money (if they're well-kept). People are really starting to desire buying in established neighborhoods over shiney new suburbs. Even in my neighborhood which has a dense canopy, tons of parks, and is very walkable - it's only 30 - 40 years old - but there's never a for-sale sign up for more than two weeks.
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  #1989  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 11:21 PM
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Hamilton














Pictures by me.
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  #1990  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 11:44 PM
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We don't see enough of Hamilton it seems.

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  #1991  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2013, 11:47 PM
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We don't see enough of Hamilton it seems.

This. Very much.
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  #1992  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2013, 2:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisallard5454 View Post
Here is an example of what you will find in cities like Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, and Edmonton:


This is my picture of Winnipeg.

The thing that sets Winnipeg a part is the sure number of mature Elm trees that it has. Literally every neighbourhood, except for one, that is not a recent subdivision looks like this. Regina, Saskatoon and Edmonton have this as well, but the difference is that in Winnipeg it is harder to find a neighbourhood without canopies like this than it is to find one with it.

Don't get me wrong though, I have seen what Dutch Elm can do, and my greatest fear is that the lack of effort that the city puts into keeping and replanting a proper canopy will leave it like a lot of Eastern cities that have already lost their Canopies.
There is only one block in Thunder Bay that even looks remotely like this.

Just one single 300 foot long stretch of road.

Actually there is another, half-kilometre stretch of this in the other end of town, so we have two. Two streets that look like this. Out of 1,000 streets. (That sounds like an exaggeration but it's true; Thunder Bay has over 1,000 named streets.) Something like 6,000 blocks, and 3 or 4 of them have tree canopies that look like that.
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  #1993  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2013, 3:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
There is only one block in Thunder Bay that even looks remotely like this.

Just one single 300 foot long stretch of road.

Actually there is another, half-kilometre stretch of this in the other end of town, so we have two. Two streets that look like this. Out of 1,000 streets. (That sounds like an exaggeration but it's true; Thunder Bay has over 1,000 named streets.) Something like 6,000 blocks, and 3 or 4 of them have tree canopies that look like that.
My street is like this, but I actually like the winter view more than summer. Walking or driving under blocks of hoar-frost laden trees always feels a little magical to me... especially at Christmastime.
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  #1994  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2013, 3:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Nathan View Post
My street is like this, but I actually like the winter view more than summer. Walking or driving under blocks of hoar-frost laden trees always feels a little magical to me... especially at Christmastime.
This!!!!! Yes!!!! I am a winter man, hence the city of my choosing. But hoar frost covered canopies with freshly fallen snow, not yet covered in sand and salt brings with it an amazing feeling.

I grew up into the Harry Potter series, and I have this really happy memory that occurred when I was eleven. I had just finished reading the first book (this was a year or two before the movie had come out yet) and on my way to school I saw a Snowy Owl perched on an Elm, in broad daylight. An amazing thing in and of itself. The cloud was grey, and snow was twinkling down, the light fluffy fat kind. The roads and sidewalks were still sprinkled white, from the fall the night before. And I remember thinking that I could very well be going to Hogwarts... How children dream. I daydreamed about it for the entire trek to school.

That was just a happy memory that I always return to with winters here. Something about fresh snow, hoar covered trees (or even snow covered), and grey skies (which are admittedly rare during Winnipeg's winters) feel so magical to me. Sorry about the diatribe. So many people say that Winters are ugly and bland, I feel the complete opposite.
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  #1995  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2013, 5:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisallard5454 View Post
This!!!!! Yes!!!! I am a winter man, hence the city of my choosing. But hoar frost covered canopies with freshly fallen snow, not yet covered in sand and salt brings with it an amazing feeling.

I grew up into the Harry Potter series, and I have this really happy memory that occurred when I was eleven. I had just finished reading the first book (this was a year or two before the movie had come out yet) and on my way to school I saw a Snowy Owl perched on an Elm, in broad daylight. An amazing thing in and of itself. The cloud was grey, and snow was twinkling down, the light fluffy fat kind. The roads and sidewalks were still sprinkled white, from the fall the night before. And I remember thinking that I could very well be going to Hogwarts... How children dream. I daydreamed about it for the entire trek to school.

That was just a happy memory that I always return to with winters here. Something about fresh snow, hoar covered trees (or even snow covered), and grey skies (which are admittedly rare during Winnipeg's winters) feel so magical to me. Sorry about the diatribe. So many people say that Winters are ugly and bland, I feel the complete opposite.
It was on its way to deliver my letter. Sorry to get your hopes up.
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  #1996  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2013, 11:40 PM
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Winter is nice until January. Then it sucks.
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  #1997  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2013, 11:43 PM
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  #1998  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2013, 11:30 PM
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  #1999  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2013, 11:54 PM
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Signal will like that Sherbrooke view
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  #2000  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2013, 11:55 PM
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I love Rimouski.
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