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  #1081  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2017, 9:35 PM
swimmer_spe swimmer_spe is online now
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Originally Posted by scryer View Post
Most of those lines are owned by the feds. Most of those lines are used to transport imports and exports, and therefore move the economy. This railyard is something that is used to transport people, and what I'm saying is that residential TOD is less likely to happen as living by railyards is actually something that usually negatively affects the value and livability of the area. Living by a station, on the otherhand, is a different story.
What are you going on about?

CN/CP/Metrolinx owns those lines. Not the feds.

Now, you are also saying that it is not going happen because there is a railyard? Toronto proves that wrong.

Better proof is Vancouver. All of their major development backs on to various rail yards. Those rail yards are what brings goods in and out of Canada.

So, please, show me what you mean by an example in Canada.
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  #1082  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2017, 10:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
Not a choice one would need to make. They are several orders of magnitude different in terms of cost. And one would be self-supporting financially.
A third bridge (and associated infrastructure) would be considerably more expensive than commuter rail (except if they choose to build a rail tunnel through the downtown core).

There would likely be better cost recovery however with a bridge rather than with rail.

One problem with the bridge option is that you are ending up depositing even more traffic on the peninsula. Where is it all going to go when it gets there??? At least with commuter rail, most of the associated vehicular parking will occur at suburban stations, and hence will stay out of the core.

No one solution is perfect. BRT will be subject to existing congestion on the few access points onto the peninsula. A third bridge will be prohibitively expensive and will contribute to worsening traffic in the core. Fast ferries probably wouldn't have the capacity to make much difference. Commuter rail won't be able to cover all areas.

My preferred solution would be a backbone of commuter rail, skipping the idea of a downtown rail tunnel, but connecting to and supplemented by trolleys on main downtown streets and also fast ferries to improve connections with the Dartmouth side.
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  #1083  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2017, 4:02 PM
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is offline
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Rail yards for assembling trains really suck to live near. I think that happens more here though:

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  #1084  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2017, 7:07 PM
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Originally Posted by MalcolmTucker View Post
Rail yards for assembling trains really suck to live near. I think that happens more here though:

i live close to Rockingham yard. its not that loud. I get more noise from clanging containers at Fairview Cove.

Toronto and vancouver both have massive re-devlopment in areas that were former rail yards. that land was freed up by changes in how things are shipped. Halifax doesnt really have excess capacity. what exists now is whats needed to support operations, so its unlikely land can be freed up.
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