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  #11421  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2018, 7:06 PM
mhays mhays is offline
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Seattle's system isn't that admirable. It's much more disjointed than RTD. We have one system for regional rail and bus transit (longer routes) called Sound Transit that does well. Local service is county-based. After state-level a tax revolt long ago, the counties each tried to replace its revenue via its county's voters, with varying success over the years. King County (the big one) failed to pass a measure, so the City of Seattle ran its own measure which restored/expanded service within the city limits but didn't cover the other 1.4 million people in the county. The local agencies still run regional buses into Seattle to augment Sound Transit's service. That's before you get to the ferry systems.

Operationally it's also complicated. For starters, Sound Transit runs in downtown tunnels operated by King County Metro and Burlington Northern. The latter is why we have miniscule commuter rail service to the north. A similar issue on ground-level tracks means the south is hampered as well. Denver also has a lot more in terms of existing rail corridors, a huge factor in its far larger mileage of light rail etc. at much lower cost.
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  #11422  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2018, 7:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
Sounds like an underground pipe-dream.

Politics is a Fickle Mistress
Your second statement is the real answer here. The Charlotte region has about $2.3 billion to spend on transportation capital projects in any given year, or about $30 billion to spend between now and the 2030 timeframe noted in the article. They have the money to support a $7 billion megaproject. It's a question of whether or not they want to.
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  #11423  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 1:33 PM
LooksLikeForever LooksLikeForever is offline
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I feel like a broken record asking this again, but... any news on the G-Line? I assume it's tied to the same recent hearings regarding the quiet zones along the A-Line, but I'm hearing very little about the G.

Anyone have any insight? What's the over/under on this thing opening before 2020?
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  #11424  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 4:03 PM
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Quote:
RTD is planning an event to announce the opening date of the G Line to Arvada and Wheat Ridge.

The bad news is that we don’t know when we’ll know.

...

RTD’s latest documentation references a 2018 opening. The big factor is the Federal Railroad Administration. RTD requested permission last month to begin full testing, but they haven’t heard back yet.
https://denverite.com/2018/07/11/rtd...-what-we-know/
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  #11425  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 7:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
Seattle's system isn't that admirable. It's much more disjointed than RTD.
Thanks! That helps me to understand a (little) better.

Now about that Seattle Streetcar project. http://mynorthwest.com/1047568/seatt...ate-july-2018/
Quote:
“For example, one of the things we know is that the new streetcars, as designed, are longer than the current ones we have, and heavier,” Durkan said. “They won’t fit in the maintenance barns, for example, we are not sure if they will fit on the gauge of rail that’s there.”
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  #11426  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 10:38 PM
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  #11427  
Old Posted Jul 20, 2018, 3:01 AM
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Mr. FUGLY!

Quote:
Originally Posted by seventwenty View Post
Quote:
"Wanting to serve on RTD, this wasn't my lifelong goal," Evans says. "But I've been a vocal critic of RTD.” The Boulder native wants to be an advocate for change across the transit district's service area.

"[RTD] is a business, but it's a publicly funded business," he says. "We should be watching every dollar possible, but at the same time, if it's not serving the public who's paying for it, then why are we paying for it?"
I think all critics should run for office. It's one thing to take pot shots (w/o understanding the issues) and quite another to become a constructive spoke in the wheel.
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  #11428  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2018, 5:11 AM
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Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
Durkan said... we are not sure if they will fit on the gauge of rail that’s there.”
This smells fishy. Nobody even remotely competent enough to have a job planning a streetcar line would make a mistake like that. This project was way too far along, and had passed way too many reviews. That would be the most monumental engineering mistake since... I dunno, Galloping Girtie maybe. This seems more like a case of a mayor who's decided to bad talk the project, and is playing loose with the truth to do so.

Too bad too, because that's a legit project. Dedicated lanes, great route, really the necessary piece to making Seattle's entire streetcar network work at all.
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  #11429  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2018, 8:22 PM
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Source

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
This smells fishy.

Too bad too, because that's a legit project. Dedicated lanes, great route, really the necessary piece to making Seattle's entire streetcar network work at all.
The track compatibility did seem a bit far-fetched unless it goes to engineering stuff I don't understand like load bearing or turning radius... dunno. Not using the same stock seemed odd though.

The other issue is that everything done so far is running well over budget, sometimes waaay over budget. There's generally valid reasons but this never looks very good to taxpayer/voters.

I updated myself on what Sound Transit is doing and I was reminded why I contend that Seattle is NOT a good (transit) peer comparison for Denver. Their light rail projects are running/projected from $275-$350 million per mile (not firm figures). At those rates RTD/Fastracks could have built the A Line - train to the plane and the Flatiron Flyer.

And I'm not doubting the value of Sound Transit projects; I'm sure they will be worth every penny spent. It's just that Denver doesn't have a $54 billion pot to play with and they were able to build 6 LRT lines (~95 miles) instead of just one 23-mile line and the admittedly wildly successful Flatiron Flyer.
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  #11430  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2018, 8:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LooksLikeForever View Post
I feel like a broken record asking this again, but... any news on the G-Line? I assume it's tied to the same recent hearings regarding the quiet zones along the A-Line, but I'm hearing very little about the G.

Anyone have any insight? What's the over/under on this thing opening before 2020?

Source

RTD gets approval for the next phase of testing on the G Line
Jul 20 2018 by Ashley Dean/Denverite
Quote:
The Federal Railroad Administration has approved the next phase of testing on the G Line, which means RTD starts to ramp things up today and we inch a little closer to an opening. It’ll soon be running empty G Line trains at a full daily schedule — about 21 hours a day.
While they're already planning for the opening party they don't dare promise anything... until the ink is dry; good chance it's by the end of the year.
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  #11431  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2018, 9:35 PM
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One milestone down

Here are some of the major Colorado road projects a sales-tax hike could fund
Jul 20, 2018 By Ed Sealover – Reporter, Denver Business Journal
Quote:
CTC members on Thursday finalized a project list for the proposed 20-year request for a 0.62-cent sales-tax hike for which the Denver Chamber of Commerce and other coalition partners are collecting signatures to get onto the ballot.

It includes major highway projects in all parts of the state but is particularly heavy on two of the pinch points that have galled Denver business leaders the most — the stretch of I-25 between Denver and Fort Collins and the portion of I-70 that slows to a crawl heading to ski resorts and other mountain areas vital to Colorado’s tourist economy.
The CTC = Colorado Transportation Commission.

It was important to reach agreement despite varying opinions in order to be able to publish a specific project/priorities list for voters to clearly see what will be targeted with their tax $'s.
Quote:
Sean Duffy — a spokesman for Let’s Go Colorado, the coalition that will lead the campaign if the Denver Chamber gets its proposed tax hike on the ballot — said he believes the breadth and depth of the list of projects, which will not be on the ballot but will be sent out in the blue book that is given to all voters, should appeal to Coloradans who have listed transportation as one of their top concerns for several years.
Specific metro Denver projects would include:
Quote:
The widening of Interstate 270 from I-70 to Interstate 76
The addition of 1.5 miles of additional lanes on C-470 in both directions from U.S. 285, reconstruction of the 285 interchange and other upgrades
The widening of I-25 in the two-mile stretch between Alameda Avenue and Sixth Avenue near downtown Denver
If they can collect the necessary signatures to get this proposal on the ballot, it should pass.
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  #11432  
Old Posted Yesterday, 2:58 AM
DenverDave DenverDave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
One milestone down

Here are some of the major Colorado road projects a sales-tax hike could fund
Jul 20, 2018 By Ed Sealover – Reporter, Denver Business Journal

The CTC = Colorado Transportation Commission.

It was important to reach agreement despite varying opinions in order to be able to publish a specific project/priorities list for voters to clearly see what will be targeted with their tax $'s.

Specific metro Denver projects would include:


If they can collect the necessary signatures to get this proposal on the ballot, it should pass.
I'm not a subscriber. Any bones thrown to transit or multimodal?
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  #11433  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:07 AM
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Originally Posted by DenverDave View Post
I'm not a subscriber. Any bones thrown to transit or multimodal?
Not specifically but...

CDOT will receive 60% of the new revenue of which 15% must be spent on transit/mobility. CDOT generally adds bike paths along all of their freeway projects. They also are now running the Bustang service which they intend to expand and which I recently took from DUS up to Frisco. It was a very nice ride. CameraShy believes that Summit County likely has the best transit stops/service in the state and I'd agree the FREE Summit Stage Shuttle was very impressive. Just a guess that CDOT provided (matching) grant money and/or engineering and construction services for their setup. So that's the type of thing they might do. With respect to their planning process CDOT describes how they make their decisions HERE.

Additionally, 40% of the new revenue will be redirected to local (city/county) jurisdictions for transportation purposes at their discretion. So for example the City/County of Denver can use their share however they wish.
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