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  #2021  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2016, 6:18 PM
shreddog shreddog is offline
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Originally Posted by Airboy View Post
Also Concordia and Kings College.
Yeah I purposefully cut off the list at the smaller schools as there are a number in each city (Calgary - St Marys/Ambrose/ABC etc) that only add up to a couple thousand for each city.

The point is that there doesn't seem to be a significant difference in post-secondary student enrollment in both cities and a quick glance at the respective websites appears to indicate that the staff levels are the same, hence my question.

Since I first moved to Calgary the mantra was always that post-secondary was a bigger fish in Edmonton, but I was never able to find any facts to support that.
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  #2022  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2016, 6:42 PM
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A very simple explanation would be that post-secondary is a more important chunk of the GDP in Edmonton due to Calgary having a bigger GDP.
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  #2023  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2016, 7:14 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
A very simple explanation would be that post-secondary is a more important chunk of the GDP in Edmonton due to Calgary having a bigger GDP.
Could be, but the point is more often brought up with regards to employment, not GDP. Namely that currently Edmonton is doing better wrt job losses as a result of the post-secondary element of its economy. While that could be true, I have yet to see evidence indicating that is a larger in absolute terms than Calgary.

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...
We do have a lot of Secondary education institutions which help though
...
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  #2024  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2016, 7:43 PM
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Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
Very interesting development in the Chinese Yuan today.

It absolutely plunged against the US$ by a whopping 10% and is now trading at levels not seen since the 2008 recession. This is due to a combination of factors but primarily due to continued outflows of capitol, strict regulations to stop it, a very weak Chinese economy growing at about 2% per year as is estimated by most economists, a BoC not willing to prop it up, Trump's electoral win and his promise to come down very on unfair Chinese trade policies and to introduce major import tax, and China's out control government debt levels which have more than quadrupled in the last 6 years..........these subways are built for free.

This could have serious repercussions for Canada. It will certainly hurt the Vancouver real estate market as the price of every house they want to buy to launder their money just rose by 10% overnight...
Good.

Every city, whether it has been Vancouver, London, New York, has been harmed by letting global capital rape the local real estate market. It's time cities were given back to their citizens.
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  #2025  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2016, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
On the other hand, any Chinese who had the foresight to park a few million CAD into a moldy vacant Point Grey shack just gained 10% overnight.
No it didn't but rather quite the contrary, it probably dropped 10% overnight.

If bought today as opposed to 2 days ago, that $3 million shack on the Westside is still $3 million to Vancouverites and Canadians but it's $3.3 million to the Chinese. In 2 or 3 months if this is maintained {and there is every indication the BoC will allow the Yuan to drop even further to boost exports and it's sagging economy}, the price for Canadians themselves will drop far greater as the near sole market for these shacks are the Chinese laundering their money..........their buyers have vanished.

These shacks reducing their prices forces all prices down. In speculative markets, which Vancouver has written the book on, price inclines and booms always start at the top end of the market and conversely the crashes also all start there.
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  #2026  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2016, 10:52 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
This document (http://3plus.ca/documents/Greater_Mo...d37101d4c6.pdf) produced by the 3+ Corporation (the economic development agency for greater Moncton) has looked at this and here are some comparisons:

Median Family Income (2014):
Vancouver - $71,140
Calgary - $98,300
Toronto - $71,210
Montreal - $71,390
Halifax - $80,490
Moncton - $71,800

In other words, the median family income in Moncton and Halifax compares very favourably with the major Canadian cities.

Average Real Estate Price (2014):
Vancouver - $514,950 (7.2x annual income)
Calgary - $459,640 (4.7x annual income)
Toronto - $566,531 (8.0x annual income)
Montreal - $320,323 (4.5x annual income)
Halifax - $276,040 (3.4x annual income)
Moncton - $155,816 (2.2x annual income)

So, as of 2014, housing is four times more expensive (relatively speaking) in Toronto as it is in Moncton. This can have a huge impact on a family's disposable income. I certainly know that in my neighbourhood, we often have middle management type people moving into the area from TO quite frequently and they can't believe how much further their money goes down here than it does back in the big smoke. I've known more than a few of these people who have actually been quite reluctant to move back to Toronto once their term down here in Moncton is over. It's not just the cost of living, but also the space, lack of traffic congestion, neighbourliness and the peace & quiet of the Maritimes.
Given that those are 2014 data, housing now is probably 5-6 times more expensive in Toronto given the enormous price increases just in the last two years, while I doubt Moncton has increased much at all in that time. Really you have to have an enormous income (I'd say at least $250K or $300K) to comfortably afford Toronto or Vancouver these days...
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  #2027  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2016, 11:35 PM
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Originally Posted by eternallyme View Post
Really you have to have an enormous income (I'd say at least $250K or $300K) to comfortably afford Toronto or Vancouver these days...
No you don't.
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  #2028  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2016, 11:51 PM
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Originally Posted by eternallyme View Post
Given that those are 2014 data, housing now is probably 5-6 times more expensive in Toronto given the enormous price increases just in the last two years, while I doubt Moncton has increased much at all in that time. Really you have to have an enormous income (I'd say at least $250K or $300K) to comfortably afford Toronto or Vancouver these days...
Family friendly 3 bedroom units in both Vancouver and Toronto for less than 300k:

https://www.realtor.ca/Residential/S...ge-The-Westway

https://www.realtor.ca/Residential/S...olumbia-V3J7K4

Yes, if you want a single family detached home walking distance to the downtown core in either Vancouver or Toronto, you will be paying for it. Otherwise, as long as your housing expectations match living in two of the largest more urban Canadian cities, you can easily afford both places.

I get that some people are die hard single family detached homes only types. If that is the case, and that is more important to you than location, career, prospects, upward mobility, and the litany of other things that these large urban centres can provide, by all means. Make that choice.
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  #2029  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2016, 1:14 AM
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About the whole Edmonton-Calgary student thing, I made this chart a while back. It shows the number of university students per 1000 people in each CMA. It's not really a scientific comparison (Quebec for example will be lower because of structural differences in their system) and I only used universities specifically because of very different approaches to vocational education in different provinces that I didn't want to pick through, but here it is:

Undergraduate university students per 1000 people (CMA borders)


Based on that chart, compared to Calgary, Edmonton does have a noticeably larger student population relative to the size of the city.

As expected, smaller cities rule the roost. Guelph & Kingston in particular are huge heavyweights.. about one-sixth of the entire city of Guelph is students!
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  #2030  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2016, 3:24 AM
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Last edited by shreddog; Dec 7, 2016 at 3:35 AM.
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  #2031  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2016, 3:37 AM
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Originally Posted by 1overcosc View Post
About the whole Edmonton-Calgary student thing, I made this chart a while back. It shows the number of university students per 1000 people in each CMA. It's not really a scientific comparison (Quebec for example will be lower because of structural differences in their system) and I only used universities specifically because of very different approaches to vocational education in different provinces that I didn't want to pick through, but here it is:

Undergraduate university students per 1000 people (CMA borders)


Based on that chart, compared to Calgary, Edmonton does have a noticeably larger student population relative to the size of the city.

As expected, smaller cities rule the roost. Guelph & Kingston in particular are huge heavyweights.. about one-sixth of the entire city of Guelph is students!
I imagine that if you used the City of Waterloo rather than the K-C-W CMA, Waterloo would be at the top of the list, by a considerable margin.
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  #2032  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2016, 10:12 PM
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Read in the Vancouver Sun today about more belly aching from the restaurant and service sector in Vancouver about not being able to find enough workers and having to delay the opening of one Pizza Hut planned because they can't find or keep staff. Pizza Hut and the industry say this is happening across the city. Sales in restaurants in BC will lead the nation this year but average profitability is still below the national average due to high rent/lease costs.

This is another fallout of the housing crisis............businesses can't afford to expand due to lease rates and people can afford to live on the wages due to the astronomical cost of living and that assumes they can even find a place to live.

Of course there is never a "real" shortage of labour in relatively low skilled jobs just a shortage of businesses willing to pay a liveable wage. The thing that gets me is that it will be left-wing Trudeau who will come to their rescue of the terminally bitching service sector industry by bringing in more foreign workers and refugees to do the slave labour and keep the wages suppressed and at the same time make the rental shortage crisis even worse.

Funny how the business community always wants the market to decide wage levels and are the biggest complainers of minimum wage hikes but conversely want the government to come to their rescue when the free market isn't advantageous for them.
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  #2033  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2016, 1:00 AM
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Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
Read in the Vancouver Sun today about more belly aching from the restaurant and service sector in Vancouver about not being able to find enough workers and having to delay the opening of one Pizza Hut planned because they can't find or keep staff. Pizza Hut and the industry say this is happening across the city. Sales in restaurants in BC will lead the nation this year but average profitability is still below the national average due to high rent/lease costs.

This is another fallout of the housing crisis............businesses can't afford to expand due to lease rates and people can afford to live on the wages due to the astronomical cost of living and that assumes they can even find a place to live.

Of course there is never a "real" shortage of labour in relatively low skilled jobs just a shortage of businesses willing to pay a liveable wage. The thing that gets me is that it will be left-wing Trudeau who will come to their rescue of the terminally bitching service sector industry by bringing in more foreign workers and refugees to do the slave labour and keep the wages suppressed and at the same time make the rental shortage crisis even worse.

Funny how the business community always wants the market to decide wage levels and are the biggest complainers of minimum wage hikes but conversely want the government to come to their rescue when the free market isn't advantageous for them.
If they are having trouble hiring workers, then it simply means the carrot they are offering isn't big enough. If you can't get workers, you have to offer higher wages. It's fairly basic economics.

If paying the current market wage makes your business model unprofitable, then don't go into business.

Continuously adding temporary foreign workers so that wages don't have to rise doesn't benefit local residents.
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  #2034  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2016, 1:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Procrastinational View Post
If they are having trouble hiring workers, then it simply means the carrot they are offering isn't big enough. If you can't get workers, you have to offer higher wages. It's fairly basic economics.

If paying the current market wage makes your business model unprofitable, then don't go into business.

Continuously adding temporary foreign workers so that wages don't have to rise doesn't benefit local residents.
It's a bit of a double edged sword in that, yes, bringing in TFW's does lower the wages for some sectors of the economy, but which sectors are actually using TFW's? Generally unskilled labour which acts as a bedrock of the basic service economy. Fast food, cleaning, restaurants, agriculture.

Canada generally has a problem with not enough workers to really power a diverse economy. If you raise the wages on these fundamental service sectors, yes, wages will increase, but you will also drive away businesses who will simply not be able to make the numbers work.

Immigration, and temporary foreign workers, are key tools to use to maintain the competitiveness of the Canadian market for business as well as for the Canadian economy to compete globally. While there have been TFW and immigration abuses, keeping wages low for certain low skilled "bedrock" services while ensuring that Canadian wages for higher skilled positions remain globally competitive - does have many advantages for the economy at large, and for many average everyday citizens.
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  #2035  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2016, 5:06 AM
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Minimum wage jobs use to be the domain of strictly high school students but that is no longer the case. Even those high school students need higher wages to afford university/college tuition as their tuitions have grown MUCH faster than the rate of inflation and the rise in real wages over the last 30 years.

TFW are a cope-out for businesses that refuse to pay a living wage. If they can't afford the rates people are demanding to keep a roof over their head and food on the table then they have a poor business model and shouldn't start the business in the first place.

You can't refuse higher wages when unemployment is high but then refuse higher wages when jobs are aplenty. If you beleive in free enterprise as these associations always claim they do then they have to pay the going rate and if they can't it then they will go belly upjust like everyother business. They want government off their backs when they have lots of worker choices but demand the government come to their rescue when there are fewer workers. It's the height of hypocrisy. The problem is that Trudeau will cave in and bring in more TFW to appease them..............he said he wants to help the middle class but forgot to mention that it will be at the expense of the lower & working class.
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  #2036  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2016, 6:46 AM
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Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
Minimum wage jobs use to be the domain of strictly high school students but that is no longer the case. Even those high school students need higher wages to afford university/college tuition as their tuitions have grown MUCH faster than the rate of inflation and the rise in real wages over the last 30 years.

TFW are a cope-out for businesses that refuse to pay a living wage. If they can't afford the rates people are demanding to keep a roof over their head and food on the table then they have a poor business model and shouldn't start the business in the first place.

You can't refuse higher wages when unemployment is high but then refuse higher wages when jobs are aplenty. If you beleive in free enterprise as these associations always claim they do then they have to pay the going rate and if they can't it then they will go belly upjust like everyother business. They want government off their backs when they have lots of worker choices but demand the government come to their rescue when there are fewer workers. It's the height of hypocrisy. The problem is that Trudeau will cave in and bring in more TFW to appease them..............he said he wants to help the middle class but forgot to mention that it will be at the expense of the lower & working class.
This.

Young people are constantly told they need to get higher education in today's job market, but it's spiralling costs force them into high debt. There's no reason service jobs couldn't provide a better wage, it's just another means of transferring money from the older or wealthier cohort to the younger.

Temporary Foreign Workers are just another way for corporate interests to screw the local workers over. I'm surprised geotag is so nonplussed about it, while at the same time he rails against China's trade tactics. TFW are just another side of the same problem. Free trade in labour is just as damaging to North American living standards as any other free trade.
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  #2037  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2016, 9:13 PM
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Originally Posted by whatnext View Post
This.

Young people are constantly told they need to get higher education in today's job market, but it's spiralling costs force them into high debt. There's no reason service jobs couldn't provide a better wage, it's just another means of transferring money from the older or wealthier cohort to the younger.

Temporary Foreign Workers are just another way for corporate interests to screw the local workers over. I'm surprised geotag is so nonplussed about it, while at the same time he rails against China's trade tactics. TFW are just another side of the same problem. Free trade in labour is just as damaging to North American living standards as any other free trade.
I was just looking at a few service job ads here in the city... one listed a associate degree as a requirement for a entry level position in a clothing store. This isn't a problem for me obviously as I have a degree and am not applying for work, but it just struck me as quite
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  #2038  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2016, 11:42 PM
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I was just looking at a few service job ads here in the city... one listed a associate degree as a requirement for a entry level position in a clothing store. This isn't a problem for me obviously as I have a degree and am not applying for work, but it just struck me as quite
You sent me to Google - I had never heard of an "Associates Degree".
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  #2039  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2016, 11:53 PM
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Wouldn't North Bay be near the top of the list? Nipissing University has 5,000 undergrads and North Bay metro only has 65,000 tops.

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Originally Posted by 1overcosc View Post

Undergraduate university students per 1000 people (CMA borders)


Based on that chart, compared to Calgary, Edmonton does have a noticeably larger student population relative to the size of the city.

As expected, smaller cities rule the roost. Guelph & Kingston in particular are huge heavyweights.. about one-sixth of the entire city of Guelph is students!
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  #2040  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2016, 3:33 AM
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^ North Bay isn't a CMA. Assuming the number you gave is accurate, North Bay would score a 76.9 on that chart, so fairly near the top.
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