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  #361  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2016, 1:02 AM
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Originally Posted by north 42 View Post
^^^ I would think it's named after the original Halifax in the UK, rather than Halifax NS, I could be wrong though.
To be clear, Halifax NS was named for George Montagu-Dunk, the third Earl of Halifax, not for the City of Halifax in the UK.

I tend to agree though that this particular restaurant is probably named for the city in Yorkshire and not for the more remote city in Canada.
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  #362  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2016, 12:21 AM
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Thought I'd post a couple promotional videos for both Regina & Saskatoon. Let me know what you think/if you want to see more..

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The Saskatoon one is shot almost entirely from on top of the Bess Hotel
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  #363  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2016, 5:14 AM
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Gwyneth Paltrow's Instagram boasts of 'end of the earth' stay on Fogo Island

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Oscar-winning American actress Gwyneth Paltrow took to social media on Sunday to show off her digs for the night near the rocky shores of Fogo Island off the coast of Newfoundland.

Paltrow, who has starred in dozens of Hollywood films, posted a photo on Instagram of the Tower Studio, one of the artist studios Fogo Island Arts. The complex is affiliated with the luxury Fogo Island Inn.

Paltrow captioned the photo with "dinner spot" and the hashtag "heaven."

Dinner wasn't all Paltrow took in, as she earlier on the weekend posted a short video of a crackling fire near the water's edge, with a beautiful coastal sunset visible in the background.

CBC

Fogo Island Inn (Central) by www.experiencenl.com, on Flickr


Fogo Island Inn (Central) by www.experiencenl.com, on Flickr


Fogo Island Inn Suite Interior View by Fogo Island Inn, on Flickr


Tilting Sunset (Fogo Island) [Explored!] by Sam Russell, on Flickr
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  #364  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2016, 9:58 AM
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A lovely article following the Tely 10 (a 10-mile run through St. John's and its suburbs), one of the oldest races in Canada.

Ten Mile Island: A love letter to racing in St. John’s

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Ten years ago, I fell in love with St. John’s.

On the eastern shores of Newfoundland, in the frozen North Atlantic Ocean, St. John’s lies nestled in a narrow harbour, sheltered on all sides by a wall of great hills. It’s a city defined by paradox: shrouded in cloak of grey fog, broken only by the vibrant hues of brightly-painted clapboard houses; a relatively tiny town that still boasts better nightlife than the best of Montreal or Toronto (yes, really); a rugged coast perpetually battered by brutal winds and inhospitable weather, and yet somehow still famous for its hospitality.

Isolated from the mainland (and in outport communities, from each other), in the face of a volatile climate and an unstable fishery, the distinctive Newfoundland character has emerged. Theirs is a culture defined by a curious blend of long-suffering pride and irreverent humour. Newfoundlanders understand mainland English, but answer back in their own strange language – something akin to an Irish brogue, a dialect born of generations of islander isolation. They’re a universally bilingual people; music is their second language.

Raised partway in Dublin, Ireland as the child of Canadian expats, Newfoundland had long intrigued me for the way it seemed to blend my dual, conflicting identities. So at eighteen-years-old, in the spirit of fearlessness that defines so much of early adulthood, I decided to move there.

When you’re a mainlander living in Newfoundland, you can’t help but feel like you’ve stumbled upon one of the world’s last unspoiled treasures; the island’s inimitable charm is oddly unknown away from her own shores. And the islanders are quick to embrace the “Come-From-Aways” like myself who choose to settle there. The result is that St. John’s, and the extraordinary people who make their lives there, never really lets you go. You leave this town with a perpetual sense of unfinished business. Newfoundland, even if you’re not a native Newfoundlander, will always call you home.

This past weekend, I came home to St. John’s for what I thought would be a destination race. But really, it was a pilgrimage.

Newfoundland boasts one of the oldest road races in North America, a ten-mile course that runs a straight shot from the town of Paradise into the heart of old St. John’s. Second only to Boston and Around The Bay, the Tely 10 (diminutively named, in true Newfoundland style, for title sponsor the Telegram newspaper) is the island’s marquee athletic event.

It’s a mid-sized road race by most standards: this year saw just shy of 5,000 participants. But like so much else in Newfoundland, its modest size belies its mammoth significance in the insular island community. The local paper runs a detailed predictions page in the days leading up to race weekend. Every bit of the 16 kilometre course is lined with cheering spectators. The finish line crowds are packed five-deep, and the winners’ smiling faces are all but guaranteed to run on the cover of the paper the following morning.

In a sport so often relegated to the periphery, the Tely 10 offers a brief, shining moment in which distance runners can feel like kings.

It might look to mainlander eyes like a smaller race, but a victory in the Tely 10 is no small feat. The competitive field runs remarkably deep, and despite not having an elite program, the race consistently attracts world-class athletes from across the country.

(An unofficial elite program operates primarily in the form of local distance runner David Freake’s Twitter feed. Freake’s method is a targeted, earnest, and unrelenting year-long promotion of the event, complete with proffers of free accommodation and rides to the airport – a truly St. John’s approach if ever there was one.)

Like the island it calls home, the Tely 10 is unselfconsciously eccentric. A midsummer road race of non-standard distance with the gravitas of a championship event, it heralds the peak of racing season for Newfoundlanders. Forget the usual spring/fall training schedule; like the island’s peculiar half-hour time zone, the Tely 10 refuses to be bound by a mainland timetable. Never mind the ordinary – this is Newfoundland, after all.

Even the course markings are no exception to this. The Tely 10 mile markers aren’t your usual sandwich boards or flags, but actual road signs – permanent, integrated fixtures in the town’s infrastructure. There’s a sense of rigidity, a characteristically Newfoundland stubbornness, to be inferred from this; here is the course, as it is, as it always has been.

This isn’t an event; it’s an institution.

With the benefit of hindsight, I would have been hard-pressed to choose a better year for my first Tely 10 than this one. The 89th running of the race, 2016 is destined for infamy as the year Kate Bazeley shattered Nicola Will’s 30-year-old course record, in a finishing time of 55:34.

Bazeley, who ran to a ninth-place finish in last year’s race just weeks after giving birth to her second child, has been enjoying a banner year, with a strong performance in far-less-than-ideal conditions at the 10K road championships in Ottawa this spring. Her record-breaking run this Sunday, while not entirely unexpected, was one of those rare, dizzying moments of athletic transcendence. Make no mistake: the unofficial ambassador of Newfoundland athletics is a woman on the brink.

But though Bazeley’s competitive zeal and undeniable fitness are a force to be reckoned with on the roads, she cuts a surprisingly disarming figure in conversation at the Nautilus Running Club‘s post-race celebration later that evening.

There, in the quiet of Pippy Park, in that long, suspended summer moment between daylight and dark, is where the real weight of the Tely 10’s long history is unpacked. There are tales of high winds, and bad weather, of years that went favourably and those that didn’t, of the dominance of Paul McCloy, of the record that was broken today, and of ones that might never fall. It’s an unwritten saga, a living, oral history unwound over music and laughter, and just a bit too much of that unforgettable Quidi Vidi Beer.

“There’s a saying ’round here,” one member tells me, as a friend laments his running prowess hasn’t translated to success in today’s race. “If it’s not done at the Tely, yer not worth a damn.”

…he may not have said damn.

Chase big dreams.
https://thelongslowdistance.com/2016...g-in-st-johns/
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  #365  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2016, 2:00 PM
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American soldiers enjoy accidental friendly invasion in Stephenville

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As the town commemorates the opening of the Ernest Harmon Air Force Base 75 years ago and its closing 50 years ago in 1966 with an event called The Friendly Invasion, it was like Part 2 of that invasion as 75 service personnel stopped in the town for a crew rest and refueling of their plane earlier this week.

The accidental tourists continued on to their deployment in the Middle East as of Tuesday evening.

While many of the servicemen took the opportunity to stretch their legs and walk around town, others availed of a sightseeing tour around the Port au Port Peninsula hosted by Lorraine Gaudet, a weather observer and customer service representative for the Fixed Based Operator at the airport.

Francis Russell, senior refueller and maintenance at the airport, said he was told by some members of the group of the warm reception from people in the town.

“It was the best-ever stopover,” Spencer Angle of Kentucky wrote in a guest book of his trip around the Port au Port Peninsula; while Andrew Kehman, another serviceman out of Tennessee, called it an “awesome experience.”
http://www.thewesternstar.com/News/L...Stephenville/1
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  #366  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2016, 2:24 PM
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Has anybody seen the new "Where am I? Ontario" tourism ads? I think they are intended to encourage Ontarians toward "staycations", so people elsewhere may not be seeing them. The idea seems to be that the whole exotic world can be found here, so why go elsewhere. Dubious though that proposition might be, it's the ad itself that makes me cringe, and not just for the roller derby and Elvis imitator. And I have no idea what "I am the smoke, but never the fire" is supposed to mean!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nufc37CHso
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  #367  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2016, 2:27 PM
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Beautiful shots. "I fall down, but never up" is another weird line, though. Perhaps lose the narration, start and end the video with "Where am I?" and then linger on the word Ontario a little longer? It's a very well-filmed piece.
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  #368  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2016, 2:31 PM
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^^ Interesting. I kind of like the concept but I think the attempt to be intruiging mysterious passed the line into cryptic and confusing. My reaction to most of it was.."wait...what?" But maybe more of it would have made sense if I was from Ontario
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  #369  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2016, 6:34 PM
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Time's Sunset Travel has just named Tofino BC "Best Beach Town in the West".
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  #370  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2016, 10:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Denscity View Post
Time's Sunset Travel has just named Tofino BC "Best Beach Town in the West".
I would have taken it for granted in terms of Canada, but placing it before Santa Barbara, Santa Monica, or Cabo seems a stretch, imho.
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  #371  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2016, 3:33 AM
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It's been a while since Ontario put out a good commercial.

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  #372  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2016, 3:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Denscity View Post
Time's Sunset Travel has just named Tofino BC "Best Beach Town in the West".
It's interesting watching as travel websites begin to focus more on millennial travellers: less laying on a beach for a week, more experience based.
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  #373  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2016, 7:00 PM
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With the low dollar the one area of the whole country that is doing well is Tourism.

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Tourism is booming in Canada, especially from the U.S.
https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/blogs/i...182413093.html

Quote:
BC tourism growth projects to ‘record’ year
Quote:
British Columbia continues to be a popular place for visitors, according to the latest data released by the provincial government, which used the holiday weekend to highlight 14% growth in overnight visits through the first five months of 2016.

At the end of May, the province had welcomed international visitors for more than 1.65 million overnight stays, even though overnight visitor growth for the month of May compared to 2015 (4.8%) lagged behind the national average (5.2%).

“It looks like 2016 will be a record-breaking year for B.C.’s tourism economy,” said Destination British Columbia CEO Marsha Walden in a statement Sunday.

“Residents and visitors alike are drawn to our refined cities perched in the raw wilderness, rugged coastlines, lush rainforests and monumental mountains.”

In addition, single-day visitation from the United States increased 10.2% through the end of May compared to last year, with more than 735,000 Americans making same-day trips to B.C.

China, Australia and the U.K. continue to be B.C.’s biggest sources of overseas tourists. But the international markets with the largest growth as of May 31 were Taiwan (41.4%), Mexico (38.1%) and Switzerland (37.8%).

With 4.6% fewer tourists recorded, Southeast Asia is one of few regions from which B.C. has received a noticeable decline in visitors this year.

The Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training and Responsible for Labour also pointed to revenue growth in the hotel sector exceeding 17%. Year-to-date hotel occupancy was noted as being up significantly in Whistler (5.7%) and Nanaimo (5.5%), while Vancouver hotels have similarly been busier with 4% more room bookings.

The ministry also reports increased passenger volume at major B.C. airports and a 4.5% increase in BC Ferries passengers.
http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/2016/08/01...to-record-year

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Viva Vancouver! City on track to welcome record number of tourists
Quote:
It seems that tourists just can't get enough of Vancouver.

After record numbers of visitors in 2014 and 2015, all things are pointing to another record year for tourists visiting the city, said Ty Speer, head of Tourism Vancouver.

"It's been a fantastic year," he said. "We're on a bit of a winning streak."

One reason for tourists coming to the city is the perception of safety.

"We are seen as a safe country, and we are seen as a safe and welcoming city. That's something we should all work very hard to protect."

That diverse, welcoming atmosphere was definitely part of last week's Pride Week celebrations, Speer said.

"We have a terrific inbound number of people who come here because of what we stand for."

Top origin countries

Speer said Vancouver received tourists from all ove the world, while the top three origin countries of tourists coming into Vancouver are Canada, the United States and China.

"We get a lot of visitors from Canada," he said. "Canadians are certainly enjoying their country and they're coming to enjoy Vancouver. That's fantastic."

Numbers of tourists from the United States and China both increased by 16 per cent and 13 per cent respectively compared to last year, he said.

He also said the city is seeing growth in markets not typically seen before — like Mexico.

"Through our partners at YVR, we have flights [to and from Mexico] and now we have nearly twice as many people coming in from Mexico as last year."
https://ca.news.yahoo.com/viva-vanco...140000954.html

A lot of the growth is too the great numbers for British Columbia has lots too do with YVR.

Quote:
According to Statistics Canada, passenger rates increased at airports across Canada by 2.7%, to 133.4 million in 2015. The biggest expansion of fliers came in international traffic, up 6.6%. Domestic flights posted an increase of 1.9%.

Provincially, British Columbia recorded one of the largest increases in air travel with boosted numbers across the board: domestic (3.2%), transborder (3.6%) and international (6.7%).

Transborder travel is up over the past seven years (29%) as well as international flights (40%) and domestic travel (22.9%). Canada’s domestic travel sector still remains its largest with 79.5 million passengers taking to the skies last year, compared to transborder (26.5 million) and international (27.4 million) fliers.

One of the airports to see the biggest jump in terms of fliers last year was Gander International Airport in Newfoundland, which saw a 22% rise in domestic travellers and 18.6% climb in international fliers.
https://www.biv.com/article/2016/7/y...all-time-high/
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  #374  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2016, 7:16 PM
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I really love this one, despite the title.

Fogo Island: The Day I Was Adopted By A Canadian Island

Bolded parts that made me laugh, or happy.

Quote:
Newfoundland is massive, about the same size of California but with only about 500,000 people living there. That’s 1/76 the population of California for the math nerds out there. That means driving through Newfoundland involves a lot of driving through absolutely nothing at all, especially since the population is largely scrunched up along the coastline. That’s what I experienced on my way from St. John’s to the ferry terminal that would eventually take me to one of the most unique and certainly interesting places I’ve ever been, Fogo Island. I’ve visited other islands before; I was prepared for quirky people, strange traditions and lovely scenery. I saw all of that no doubt, but I also experienced so much more during my weekend on the island that it warrants some explanation as I struggle to define what the admittedly brief experience meant to me on a very personal level.

When it came time to plan my trip to the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador there was one place I knew I simply had to visit – Fogo Island. The reason was simple; the island is home to one of the top hotels in the world and definitely one of the most unique luxury properties I’ve ever seen. Social media had worked, the incredible photos I saw ALL THE TIME of this hotel made me desperately want to visit. I didn’t know where it was, I knew nothing about Fogo Island or how to get there and frankly I didn’t care. All I knew was that I had to visit the hotel. I’m thankful for that too, otherwise I would never have been fortunate enough to experience everything that makes the entire island, not just the hotel, so incredibly amazing.

Since you probably don’t know a lot about Fogo Island either, I thought I’d provide a brief primer. Located off the northeast cost of Newfoundland, Fogo is the largest of the province’s offshore islands at a whopping 25km long and 14km wide. It’s home to around 2,000 people spread out across a variety of communities, depending on the time of year. It’s an old place though, like much of Newfoundland it was among the first places colonized in the New World. Fishermen first started visiting the island in the 16th century and it was later settled by Irish and English visitors. This was and is an isolated place though and even the communities on the island have long been separate and distinct from each other.

In the Irish settlement of Tilting, for example, the accents are all Irish, the customs and traditions are all Irish and if you suspended disbelief for a few moments you could easily imagine yourself on the Emerald Isle. Running water, electricity, roads and cars didn’t make their way to Fogo until the early to mid-20th century or so and it’s long been studied by anthropologists for its peculiarities that separate it from just about any other place on the continent. It’s a special place; the people who live there are connected to it in every way and are fiercely proud of their home. Those personality traits may have inhibited growth for a while, but today it’s the sole reason not only for its survival, but its ability to grow and even thrive.

I know, I know, you’re thinking that I wax poetically about a lot of places and it’s true, I do. Travel excites me and I tend to get very enthusiastic about most places I visit, but Fogo is different and I’m not the only person to realize that. Checking into the Fogo Island Inn, the drive from the ferry terminal had been eye opening. Passing gorgeous coastlines, cute little towns and even bizarre-looking modern architectural works of art, I was intrigued almost right away. Just as I expected, I was met warmly and kindly by the staff at the luxury hotel, an experience I will fully explore and detail in a future series of posts. But the hotel itself is integral to the modern story of Fogo Island, because it’s not just any luxury hotel. It’s actually an experiment in modern socio-economic theory. Trust me, this is more exciting than it sounds.

I met with the hotel’s Coordinator of Community Hosting, what I thought was a strange title until I realized its importance. Much like a more traditional concierge, she helped explain everything at the property, all of the amenities and the activities I had planned, including my first introduction, a tour with a community host. Truthfully, I had no idea what this meant, but I wanted to see more of the island and figured it was the best way. Nothing prepared me for the amazing afternoon I enjoyed with that guide, but I think I’m getting ahead of myself. Let me back up and explain what exactly is going on all around Fogo Island.
And on it goes, excellent explanations of how the hotel's relationship with the community, and purpose, is so unique... gorgeous pictures, too.

http://landlopers.com/2016/08/09/fogo-island
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  #375  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2016, 4:57 AM
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Fogo must be a very CANADIAN island. Look at that shed with the maple leaf flag on it! The CANADIANS on that island seem like interesting people.

SignalHillHiker: Why do you have a faded Irish flag beside your name?

LOL
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  #376  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2016, 10:49 AM
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I shared the article myself! I think that earns a reprieve from ribbing!
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  #377  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2016, 2:02 PM
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Via jeddy1989, perhaps one of the most complimentary reviews we've ever received from an urban perspective. So many lines I wouldn't dare think, let alone say.

Via the New York Times:

I Lost My Job and My Husband. Then I Found Newfoundland.

Quote:
...

In the morning, we pressed on toward St. John’s. The towns on the way were smaller, the accents more pronounced. In Fredericton we slipped (undetected, we thought) into the back pew of a weatherboard church, where the congregants were singing hymns a cappella and by heart in what was approaching an Irish brogue. The pastor gathered the children in front of the altar and snapped his fingers in their faces when they failed to pay attention, then commanded them to sing the “welcome song” and give us bags of hard candy.

We passed through Lumberton and Newtown, stopped to roam among endless mazes of lobster traps on the docks. And in Gambo I ate the biggest portion of soft-serve ice cream I’ve had to date. The closer we got to St. John’s the colder it became — the east coast unbuffered from the ocean winds’ true power. At night it was so cold in the car I woke and buried myself beneath a heap of our dirty clothes to keep from shivering.

Then, finally, we dipped south to the Avalon Peninsula, and reached St. John’s the next afternoon. While most of the province was dark blues and greens, St. John’s was brazen in telegraphing its presence, the downtown lined with rowhouses in fuchsia, yellow and orange. Here there were stores and signs catering to tourists and plaques denoting historical achievements: Some considered St. John’s the oldest English-founded city on the continent; Signal Hill was the site of the first trans-Atlantic wireless communication. But I wondered then and now about the history of those smaller places we had passed through with no plaques to speak of.

At night there was music in the streets and crowds filled the pubs even though it was a Tuesday. I felt something inside me switch on again, the excitement of my very first days in New York City, the thrill of a new place alight and alive through the dark. We went to a bar on George Street, said yes to the house dinner special; it was called Brewis, which, in the server’s best description, contained “codfish and wet bread.” We ordered the beer ourselves.

I don’t remember where we slept that night, or the feverish drive back to the ferry port in the days that followed. I don’t remember the boat or bus rides home. New York was still hot and full of the problems I’d left there, and I spent the rest of the summer earning minimum wage by correcting the faulty geocode of Google Maps listings. I never came across any listings for Newfoundland, but sometimes I would type in Twillingate and watch the map zoom northward, allow myself to stand for a moment on the cliff where I could craft an adventure based solely on the mystery of a place’s name, and the promise of the beauty it might hold.
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/14/tr...=fb-share&_r=0

Unghhh... yessss... lol
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  #378  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2016, 12:19 PM
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I've noticed how giddy tourists from Quebec get when they visit Cobourg pier. I guess for many it may be their first time seeing an open body of water.

Lighthouse by Duane Schermerhorn, on Flickr
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  #379  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2016, 12:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TownGuy View Post
I've noticed how giddy tourists from Quebec get when they visit Cobourg pier. I guess for many it may be their first time seeing an open body of water.
Are you serious ?!?
You make it sound like la Gaspésie or Old Orchard don't exist ;-)
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  #380  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2016, 1:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TownGuy View Post
I've noticed how giddy tourists from Quebec get when they visit Cobourg pier. I guess for many it may be their first time seeing an open body of water.
I'd say that the vast majority of people in Quebec have been to Gaspesie, New Brunswick, Ogunquit, Kennebunk, Old Orchard, Cape Cod, Myrtle Beach, the Caribeans, etc, so they know what an open body of water looks like. Cobourg and the Maine beaches are about the same distance from Montreal.

I think those you saw were really surprised to see such a nice beach and pier west of Quebec. I certainly was the first time I went to Cobourg. It was a total surprise to me.
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Last edited by begratto; Aug 14, 2016 at 11:38 PM.
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