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  #3541  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2019, 7:48 PM
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Originally Posted by kool maudit View Post
It is, it's American in origin too. It's like a stage direction.
It is a stage direction from Broadway. Same as "spirit fingers".
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  #3542  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2019, 7:49 PM
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Well, blimey. Funny how cultural myopia works. In all my years I've literally never heard it used anywhere outside of a few references in British TV shows.
Perhaps a lot of the British shows you watch are heavily tied to West End theatre. Of the American shows you watch, they are not so tied to Broadway.
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  #3543  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 12:28 AM
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Is "jazz hands" specifically British, or do North Americans use it too?

I recently came across the term in several different British shows and contexts, but hadn't heard it before. Then it showed up in an American context and got me to wondering if we're adopting it or if it's always been a term that's been used here.
I have friends who work in the entertainment industry who live in Toronto and they've used that term for awhile. I remember hearing it first around the year 2000. I think it's a term that has been used in theatre, show biz and musical acts for a long time meaning when someone puts their hands up and wiggles their fingers.

A friend told me of a school in Toronto, I think it was a private school, where the principal did not liking clapping as applause for school productions. The principal thought that clapping was uncivilized and barbaric or something like that. So she actually instructed the parents and others in the audience to show "jazz hands" in appreciation and they could cheer or woo along with it. My friend went to see a school play at that school where his friend's child was it in and he couldn't believe what he was seeing. For awhile, when a bunch of us got together including my friend, we would praise and applaud everything with jazz hands just to be silly after having heard that story.
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  #3544  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 2:58 AM
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Jazz hands might be a precursor to dabbing.
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  #3545  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 4:11 AM
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Bianca Andreescu sounds like she has a standard GTA accent, i.e. without the really long A in words like "slams" etc. that you get farther down south in Ontario. And there's no "hoser" in how she talks, yet she still sounds rather distinctively Canadian in a North American context.

What I think is fascinating is that the way she and younger kids in the GTA are speaking shows a development that goes contrary to the received wisdom that the world is homogenizing. Undoubtedly this must have something to do with Toronto now having a stronger sense of being its own centre of gravity.

Video Link


Contrast Bianca the GTA kid with a local here from the Stratford area who has a more American way of speaking as typified with the longer A in words like "and."

Video Link


You really can hear the difference between the GTA/Golden Horseshoe and southwestern Ontario. But it's devilishly difficult trying to identify any sort of border between the Golden Horseshoe and southwestern Ontario when it comes to accents. I think maybe you can trace an accent continuum along the QEW and the 401 as they proceed towards Hamilton/St. Catharines and London, respectively.
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  #3546  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 12:59 PM
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To me it sounds like she has a hint of an Eastern European accent... I would imagine her parents and close relatives must have fairly distinct Romanian accents which have crept into her manner of speaking a bit. (Of course, if they have standard GTA-Canadian accents then my theory goes out the window)

She definitely doesn't sound American, though. I agree with you there.
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  #3547  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 1:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rousseau View Post

Contrast Bianca the GTA kid with a local here from the Stratford area who has a more American way of speaking as typified with the longer A in words like "and."

Video Link


You really can hear the difference between the GTA/Golden Horseshoe and southwestern Ontario. But it's devilishly difficult trying to identify any sort of border between the Golden Horseshoe and southwestern Ontario when it comes to accents. I think maybe you can trace an accent continuum along the QEW and the 401 as they proceed towards Hamilton/St. Catharines and London, respectively.
Even in the first couple of words that softball player said: "a long taaahhhyme". Like an elongated vowel sound. To me "time" is much more clipped when most Canadians say it.
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  #3548  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 1:26 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
To me it sounds like she has a hint of an Eastern European accent... I would imagine her parents and close relatives must have fairly distinct Romanian accents which have crept into her manner of speaking a bit. (Of course, if they have standard GTA-Canadian accents then my theory goes out the window)
.
Totally agree about the Eastern European accent. I would not mistake her for a purely native English speaker, at least if I spoke to her for any length of time beyond simple transactional stuff in a store or restaurant.
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  #3549  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 1:28 PM
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Though IMO, to the untrained/less attentive ear either of these girls *could* definitely sound American.
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  #3550  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 1:33 PM
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Bianca was born in the GTA, but moved between Canada and Romania during her youth. It's likely her family language was (and still is to some degree) Romanian.

Her coach is also this guy, so she's spent and spends a lot of time in her life with people who don't have native anglo accents:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZTEzEZkIsc
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  #3551  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 1:37 PM
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The first time I heard her in an interview during the Rogers Cup I said, yup, GTA accent. GTA accent isn't uniform due to all the different cultures. For most people with it I see it like half their accent is GTA the other half is their ethnic background. So it's not instantly recognizable, but if you're from here then you should be able to pick up on it.

And I should also point out that lots of people here don't have the accent. It's more prevalent in youth and some carry it into their advancing years and some drop it.

For those that have it thicker than her, to me, they sound less sophisticated. Of course, I wouldn't have said that in my younger years.

I worked with a half Canadian, half Greek girl in her 30s that advanced quickly in her career due to being hard working, a go-getter and being attractive. She has an obvious GTA accent and if you just listened to her on the phone for instance, you wouldn't think much of her. But in person she is much more sophisticated than you would think.

And yes, she has an element of EE to her accent as from what I read, she spent some of her youth in Romania as well and grew up hearing it at home of course. I know a couple of people like this, born here but went back EE and then back here and same thing.
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  #3552  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 1:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Bianca was born in the GTA, but moved between Canada and Romania during her youth. It's likely her family language was (and still is to some degree) Romanian.
Ah OK, then in that case it's 100% a Romanian accent that we're hearing. With two Romanian parents (that is the case, isn't it?) and having spent time living in Romania, I would wager that she speaks Romanian at home or with family in Canada.
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  #3553  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 1:40 PM
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Originally Posted by megadude View Post
For those that have it thicker than her, to me, they sound less sophisticated. Of course, I wouldn't have said that in my younger years.
Ha, you sound like a Manhattanite talking about someone with a Brooklyn or Staten Island accent
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  #3554  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 2:02 PM
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Ah OK, then in that case it's 100% a Romanian accent that we're hearing. With two Romanian parents (that is the case, isn't it?) and having spent time living in Romania, I would wager that she speaks Romanian at home or with family in Canada.

No, it's definitely a Toronto accent. Without actually knowing where she was from or what her ethnic background is I could 100% place her as being from the GTA.

Even if there is a tinge of Romanian in there, as Megadude described there are commonly regional/ethnic variations on the Toronto accent anyway. An Italian from Woodbridge and a Jamaican from North York and a Chinese guy from Scarborough are bound to sound a little different, but will all still be unmistakably Torontonian.
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  #3555  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 2:08 PM
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Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
Bianca Andreescu sounds like she has a standard GTA accent, i.e. without the really long A in words like "slams" etc. that you get farther down south in Ontario. And there's no "hoser" in how she talks, yet she still sounds rather distinctively Canadian in a North American context.

What I think is fascinating is that the way she and younger kids in the GTA are speaking shows a development that goes contrary to the received wisdom that the world is homogenizing. Undoubtedly this must have something to do with Toronto now having a stronger sense of being its own centre of gravity.

Video Link


Contrast Bianca the GTA kid with a local here from the Stratford area who has a more American way of speaking as typified with the longer A in words like "and."

Video Link


You really can hear the difference between the GTA/Golden Horseshoe and southwestern Ontario. But it's devilishly difficult trying to identify any sort of border between the Golden Horseshoe and southwestern Ontario when it comes to accents. I think maybe you can trace an accent continuum along the QEW and the 401 as they proceed towards Hamilton/St. Catharines and London, respectively.
I think a big part of what you're hearing is the fact that one of those two has non-English speaking immigrant parents. That, more than anything else, is defining the "GTA accent" (suburbs division). Stratford is also on the edge of "Letterkenny country", no?
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  #3556  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 2:18 PM
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When I spent two weeks on the UWS in Manhattan a few years ago I only heard one person with a thick Brooklyn accent and it was fascinating. He was walking after work with gym bag in hand with who I assume were two co-workers to go play ball. They were Wall Street types in their late 20s. I was walking behind them on the sidewalk so I heard everything.

Just listening to that one Brooklyn guy and not seeing him in a suit you would think he was a construction worker until they started talking about the market. It was fascinating to hear.

As for me, I would say I probably have a little bit of an accent when I'm at work. You would assume I'm from the GTA. When I'm with friends or family then it comes out more.
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  #3557  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 2:19 PM
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Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
No, it's definitely a Toronto accent. Without actually knowing where she was from or what her ethnic background is I could 100% place her as being from the GTA.

Even if there is a tinge of Romanian in there, as Megadude described there are commonly regional/ethnic variations on the Toronto accent anyway. An Italian from Woodbridge and a Jamaican from North York and a Chinese guy from Scarborough are bound to sound a little different, but will all still be unmistakably Torontonian.
Most definitely. Those are the exact examples I was thinking of adding in my post.
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  #3558  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 2:22 PM
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Of all the celebrities, Drake is the best example. He turns it on and off depending on the audience.

His accent aligns more closely to the Jamaican variation I'd say due to who he would hang out with growing up, but he's half American half Jewish.
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  #3559  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 2:30 PM
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At work there's someone in funding from Guyana. She's been here for several years but her accent is basically unchanged.

There's a Director of a dept. from Jamaica, but she has been here much longer. She does not speak with a thick accent. It's definitely a Caribbean accent, and I get the impression she's from upper middle class there, but she still tones it down because I've heard her speak on the phone in the lunch room where she lets it out more.

One of the obvious conclusions to be drawn is that it depends who your peers are and where you are in the hierarchy.
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  #3560  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 2:34 PM
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Originally Posted by megadude View Post
At work there's someone in funding from Guyana. She's been here for several years but her accent is basically unchanged.

There's a Director of a dept. from Jamaica, but she has been here much longer. She does not speak with a thick accent. It's definitely a Caribbean accent, and I get the impression she's from upper middle class there, but she still tones it down because I've heard her speak on the phone in the lunch room where she lets it out more.

One of the obvious conclusions to be drawn is that it depends who your peers are and where you are in the hierarchy.
Reminds me of a secretary I once had who was from Newfoundland. Speaking to me in the office, she spoke "Newfoundland". Speaking with family on the phone, she'd revert to "cut it with a knife". Middle-class Jamaicans are bilingual, speaking both "Jamaican" and patois.
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