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  #41  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2005, 10:04 PM
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Shore Club Condominiums

LOOKS LIKE A SHORE THING



November 5, 2005 -- A flurry of buyers has descended on the Shore Club Condominiums at Newport, the latest addition to Jersey City's Newport community.

Since opening for sales in late September, 184 of the building's 214 units have sold, despite the fact that developer LeFrak Organization did not advertise the condos.

So what drew buyers? Jamie LeFrak, general manager at LeFrak Organization, believes that buyers, the majority of whom were already renters at Newport, simply saw the Web site address posted on the construction lot of Shore Club.

A sprawling, 600-acre mixed-use community along the Hudson, Newport is also likely to attract Manhattanites looking for more space, according to LeFrak. Prices start at $395,000 for 780-square-foot one-bedrooms, $548,000 for 1,100-square-foot two-bedrooms, and $795,000 for 1,420-square-foot three-bedrooms (all sizes are approximates). All but four units come with terraces, while the top floor of the building includes a Wellness Center (with a steam room and sauna), a spa with whirlpool, gym and playroom.

www.shoreclubatnewport.com


Last edited by macmini; Nov 15, 2005 at 8:31 PM.
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  #42  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2005, 10:05 PM
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update on 77 Hudson K Hov and Equity Residential are doing a joint venture. It will consist of two residential towers one will be condos and the other rentals. The original plan for 77 Hudson by Hartz was for an 32 story office tower.

**77 Hudson – Khovnanian

48 stories, 39 above a 9 story parking garage

Two towers, 896 units; 500 foot height requirement met

½ rental: $1800 – 3700/mo

½ condo: $700k - $1M+

21k sf commercial on ground level – primarily Grand Street

Street entrances on Greene and Hudson

Garage entrance and services on Morris

Foundation work starts mid-2006

28-30 months to complete – 2009

1 parking space per unit met

Last edited by macmini; Nov 12, 2005 at 11:29 PM.
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  #43  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2005, 12:03 AM
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December 2005

In New Jersey, a boom focuses eastward

Lower sales prices and Manhattan views dot the Hudson River with new condo projects
By Alison Gregor


Development heats up across the Hudson: Jamie LeFrak at the site of the Shore Club Condominiums in Jersey City, across from Lower Manhattan.

Residential real estate developers are mining profits from New Jersey's "Gold Coast," where a building boom has conferred new cachet on a handful of Hudson River towns that have sometimes been overlooked. From Jersey City to Fort Lee, the riverfront communities across the Hudson from Manhattan are seeing new luxury development that competes with New York City projects loaded with amenities, but at half the price.

Developers say both condominiums and rental apartments are being snapped up. The Hudson Club at Port Imperial, a 344-unit condominium conversion in West New York, sold 50 apartments in its first week on the market in early November, said Beth Fisher, senior managing director at the Corcoran Group.

South of there, the Shore Club, being developed by the LeFrak Organization in Jersey City, moved 196 of 214 units in just over two months. The Beacon, a $350 million historical redevelopment project also located in Jersey City, slightly further inland, sold almost half of its 315 available units in five weeks, developer George Filopoulos, president of Metrovest Equities, said.

Buyers are responding to bargain-basement prices that are a subway stop away – at least in the Jersey City area, which is accessible by PATH trains that run all day.

"Jersey City got into the condo game a little later than the surrounding areas," Filopoulos said. "But you still have an opportunity to purchase an apartment at half of what it costs right across the river. As long as that remains the price point, I think all these projects slated for development will do very well."

The units being created in Jersey City and other Hudson County cities are mostly one- and two-bedroom apartments, along with a handful of studios, though the latter are typically more popular in Manhattan. There are fewer apartments with three bedrooms or more, though towns in formerly industrial parts of Bergen County are seeing the development of many townhouses as suburbanization spreads.

Besides The Beacon, which is pricing studios, one- and two-bedroom apartments from $300,000 to $700,000, there are several other projects in Jersey City, an urban area with a multitude of mass transit options and a commercial downtown viewed as an extension of Manhattan.

At the Zephyr Lofts in Jersey City, studios, one-bedrooms and two-bedrooms are asking about $500 a square foot, around half the price of new development in Manhattan. Similarly, at the waterfront project Port Liberté, also in Jersey City, 766-square-foot condos start at $345,000.

A loft rental conversion called 150 Bay Street recently opened in the Powerhouse Warehouse Arts District, a formerly commercial area being marketed to artists as Jersey City's Soho. Developer Jeff Gural, chairman at Newmark, said he's testing the market for rentals among the new wave of condominiums. "It's tough to do a rental, because Jersey City really doesn't give you much of an incentive tax-wise," he said. "New York City gives you much bigger real estate tax incentives to do rentals."

Condominiums are a different story. A partnership of the Athena Group and GoldenTree InSite Partners is doing a $110 million, 33-story condo project called "A" condominiums with about 250 units.

Louis Dubin, Athena Group's president and CEO, said cheap land costs make condo development lucrative. "The land cost is considerably lower across the river in New Jersey, by a factor of anywhere from two to four," said the New York-based developer. "And although the projects on the Jersey waterfront tend to be union, like in Manhattan, construction costs tend to be a little less.

"Our opening prices are going to be a little bit less than half of the median for a new condominium in Manhattan," Dubin added. "The median is about $1,100 a square foot, and we're opening at between $525 and $550 a foot. It's a great deal."

About half of the developers working on New Jersey's Gold Coast are from New York, and half are from New Jersey or elsewhere, said developer Jamie LeFrak of the LeFrak Organization, one of the coastal area's largest developers. There are some advantages to developing property in New Jersey.

"Because of the difference in the way zoning is handled, our zoning is per dwelling unit in Jersey City, not per floor-area ratio, so apartments tend to be quite large and very liveable," LeFrak said. "A one-bedroom apartment is more like 800 square feet, unlike New York, where you'd see 650 square feet."

Even so, New York City has a much better scheme for tax abatements, LeFrak said, not to mention that publicity for new projects is well above that seen on New Jersey's coast.

"Somebody puts up eight units in Brooklyn, and suddenly, Brooklyn is Versailles," he said. "In Jersey City, there's been luxury high-rise development since we started there in 1985, but it still typically gets passed over by the New York-centric media. In a funny way, the same thing tends to be true of New Jersey media, which view the state's own waterfront as an extension of Manhattan."

The media may not overlook New Jersey's Gold Coast for long. The quantity of new residential development is catching attention – and may be inflating prices.

"The big thing with the whole Jersey City market right now is new construction, which is, of course, driving up all the other prices," said Michael Miller, a broker with New Jersey Gold Coast Real Estate. But the upper end of the market is still a struggle, he says. "Our hardest sale, especially in Jersey City, is $1 million and above. If a client comes here looking for that, they've probably already looked in Manhattan and determined they like the Jersey City lifestyle."

That lifestyle still may be lacking in retail services, though developers are providing a lot of commercial as part of their residential developments. For instance, more retail of is needed in Paulus Hook, Jersey City's answer to Greenwich Village, Filopoulos said.

But buyers are still flooding into the area. They include not only young professionals and growing families priced out of the New York market. Many buyers are "empty nesters" from inland New Jersey and even other parts of the country, Filopoulos said.


Developers build for a view

The market for New Jersey waterfront development appears to be bottomless as long as a project can offer views of Manhattan's skyscrapers.

Whether residents are commuting to Downtown Manhattan from Hoboken or to Midtown from north of Weehawken, they all have unparalleled views of a world-renowned skyline. Now there's enough growth in the area that builders can design projects to attract specific groups of potential buyers, rather than putting up a riverview building and seeing who wants to look east.

"The focus of every building we've done is views, views and more views, because that's really what developers are selling," said Michael Gelfand, partner and head of residential design at architects Gruzen Samton LLP.

The firm, which has an office in New York, is working on a project in just about every town along the Gold Coast of New Jersey, Gelfand said. Among them are the Watermark, WCI Communities' 206-unit condominium on River Road in North Bergen, and Tarragon Corporation's 168-unit development One Hudson Park – the first new construction high-rise condominium to be built in Edgewater, just across the water from the Upper West Side and Harlem.

The latter is completely feng shui-inspired and intended to appeal to Edgewater's Asian community, which may indicate how much the Gold Coast market has matured, Gelfand said.

"Because the market has gotten bigger, these don't have to be generic buildings that appeal to anybody and everybody because these are pioneering neighborhoods," he said. "Now that demand has increased, you're going to see these buildings geared more toward specific demographics."

Along those lines, Florida's WCI Communities, which bills itself as the largest publicly-held developer of luxury residential towers, will be offering a resort-style development in the Watermark that appeals to the company's typical buyer – one located outside of the New York City metropolitan area, Gelfand said.

Michael Miller, a broker with New Jersey Gold Coast Real Estate, said that the large amount of residential development coming to the market on the Gold Coast has led him to caution investors.

"I tell them, especially those looking [in Bergen County], to look at things that have unique properties to them," he said. "I think it may become a difficult market if you buy a condominium that doesn't have anything unique to it, like a view of Manhattan or larger square footage."
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  #44  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2005, 12:46 AM
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so did trump tower NJ and athena begin construction in Nov like they were supposed to
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  #45  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2005, 5:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazpmk
so did trump tower NJ and athena begin construction in Nov like they were supposed to
The Athena tower started construction in November but The Trump tower has yet to start.
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  #46  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2006, 1:11 AM
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700 Grove
700 Grove Street
www.700grove.com
Developer: Toll Brothers
Condo's
started: 2005
finished: 2006
Stories: 12
230-unit


Last edited by macmini; Jan 18, 2006 at 9:44 PM.
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  #47  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2006, 3:48 AM
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Liberty harbor
http://www.libertyharbor.com/index.php

The Liberty Harbor North Redevelopment is ready to leap from the drawing board into reality!

Peter Mocco and Jeff Zak are the principal developers of the $2 billion project. Andres Duany, chief architect of Liberty Harbor North, is known for the famed "New Urbanism" city planning concept, as exemplified by the Seaside development in Florida.

The 86-acre mixed-use development will have more than 6,000 units in housing; 775,000 square-feet for retail; 175,000 square-feet for school facilties; 1.1 million square-feet for a hotel; and 4.6 million square-feet for offices.



During the Spring months of 2005, we’ve been working hard developing Liberty Harbor. And as we survey the grounds in April, we see five brand new City roads, seven blocks worth of new basement and garage construction, and the foundations and footings for our beautiful homes in Section 1.


Should you find yourself winding through Grand Street and Liberty View Drive in May, you’ll see our masons preparing the grounds for the pouring of townhouse and brownstone foundations. Meanwhile, we continue our work shaping and developing the seven new City blocks on our site.


June 2005


Summer is in full swing, and so is construction throughout Liberty Harbor. Our roads are growing, utilities are being connected, and no fewer than three new City blocks of townhouses and brownstones are rising from their construction sites. Perhaps most exciting of all, the largest structure in our community, the Condominium, has its foundation in place as we prepare for its framing to begin.


Construction is now in full view, the lumber has arrived. The townhouses and brownstones are being framed; the first floors are just taking shape. All other construction is moving forward on schedule.


The townhouses and brownstones we began in the Spring have come into their own. These luxury homes in sections 4 and 1 have transformed the landscape of Grand Street from a site of great potential to a warm, welcoming neighborhood.


Standing at our newly constructed intersection between Liberty View Drive and Grand Street, you’ll greet the epically beautiful Statue of Liberty in unobstructed sight. Our luxury townhouses and brownstones are completely framed. Soon their structures will be complete when the roofers arrive to cap these beautiful homes.


November 2005


December 2005


January 2006


February 2006

Last edited by macmini; Feb 7, 2006 at 10:08 PM.
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  #48  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2006, 12:46 AM
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GlobeSt.com UPDATE: Trump Partner Gets $171M Loan
By Eric Peterson
Last updated: January 18, 2006 08:20am

JERSEY CITY-Corus Bank has closed on a $171-million loan to Vector Urban Renewal Associates I, an affiliate of the Hoboken-based Metro Homes and its head, Dean Geibel. The financing is for Trump, Jersey City, a massive residential/retail complex that Metro Homes and Geibel are developing in partnership with Donald J. Trump.

As GlobeSt.com reported at the time, the project was unveiled back in late September with a price tag estimated at $415 million. When completed, it will be operated under the Trump umbrella of properties and managed by the Trump Organization.

“Despite the large loan size, the bank was able to close the transaction without participants,” says Keith Gibbons, first vice president of Corus Bank, a subsidiary of the Chicago-based Corus Bankshares Inc. Rising on a two-acre parcel at Washington and Bay streets in this city’s Exchange Place neighborhood, the complex’s two towers, when completed, will be the tallest buildings in the State of New Jersey. The project will include a 531,500-sf tower topping out at 55 stories and containing 445 condo homes. The second tower, reaching 50 floors, will total more than 480,000 sf and have 417 homes.

Work will start on the larger of the two towers first, and both will be linked by a 330,000-sf, seven-story base that will include a parking structure with a capacity of nearly 700 cars. The base unit will also house 23,000 sf of retail space, a business center, a private 8,000-sf fitness and a rooftop plaza with an outdoor heated pool, among other things.

Construction is being done by Bovis Lend Lease on a design produced by DeWitt Tishman Architects. The development partners are targeting the end of 2007 for initial occupancy.
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  #49  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2006, 8:05 AM
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This was posted by Historyrules on JC List great article in The Sunday Star-Ledger about the PowerHouse located at First Street and Washington Boulevard on the Jersey City waterfront.



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  #50  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2006, 9:01 PM
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St. Francis Hospital Redevelopment

St. Francis Hospital has been a major anchor on Jersey City's Hamilton Park for nearly 150 years. The Franciscan Sisters of the Pooe founded the hospital originally as a three-story brick house on Hamilton Square in 1863.The hospital expanded several times turning the east side of Hamilton Park into a jumble of building styles on a non conforming footprint.The building contained approximately 400,000 square feet of floor area.

Proposed Phases of Development

Transform the existing hospital structure located on the east side of Hamilton Park and two nearby parcels - the parking garage on Erie street and the vacant lot located at 210 Ninth Street - into residences, commercial/retail space, and enclosed parking.

The first phase of development should take place in the spring of 2006 on McWilliams Place and will take approximately one year to complete.This phase will include the facad replacement of the brown brick tower, the restoration of the circa 1920's building on the corner of Erie and Ninth Streets, and the construction of a new six story infill building on the corner of McWilliams Place and Ninth Street. In addition, the main building immediately to the south will be razed at this time. When completed, this block will contain approximately 125 residences.

The second phase of the project will be the new construction of approximately 75 and the adaptive reuse of the Nursing School on Eighth Street into appromimately 35 residences. All of the building will contain ground floor commercial space and underground parking. The commercial space contemplated to be located within the project include boutiques and cafes, The Garden Pre-School, a gym/health club and doctors/professional offices.

The Third phase of the project will be the dismantling of the parking garage on Erie Street, and replacing it with a new aesthetically pleasing brick and glass structure that will include indoor parking and approximately 65 residences with ground floor retail. The vacant lot at 210 Ninth Street will see the new construction of a five story residential building compatible with the adjacent structures.

Exeter is also committed to contributing to the rehabilitation and preservation of Hamilton Park, and has begun to refurbish the existing chain link fence that surrounds the Park.


You can find more renderings at http://www.saintfrancisjerseycity.com/






Last edited by macmini; Jan 31, 2006 at 9:19 PM.
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  #51  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2006, 10:56 PM
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99 Montgomery a small project but one of my favorite projects under construction in Jersey City. On the corner of Montgomery and Warren it has Curved Glass structure with the Historic Facade still in place.

you can see construction pics @ http://www.emporis.com/en/il/pc/?id=...&yr=2005&mt=9"


Last edited by macmini; Jan 30, 2006 at 11:17 PM.
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  #52  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2006, 11:09 PM
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GROVE POINTE

Grove Ponite now has a website their is not much information on the site the full site is still under construction. www.grovepointecondos.com

29 stories
525 residential units and 535 parking spots
* 67 condominiums
* 458 rental apartments

Besides the residential building, the project also calls for developers to re-design the one-block section of Newark Avenue (borders are Grove and Marin) as well as the triangular park area that includes the entrance to the Grove Street PATH station.

The ground floor facade will host 20,000 sq.ft. of retail space. The plans envision streetside cafes with outside tables, trees, planters, bike racks, and decorative lights. The functional backside of the building (on Morgan) will also be landscaped and decoratively lit.






Last edited by macmini; Jan 31, 2006 at 4:24 AM.
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  #53  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2006, 6:35 PM
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Jersey City makes the short list for Jets home office site

By JANET FRANKSTON
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
NEWARK - The New York Jets are considering five northern New Jersey sites - including Jersey City - for the team's new corporate headquarters and practice facility, including a former Exxon headquarters in Florham Park.

Also in the running: Wood-Ridge, Berkeley Heights and Millburn.

As part of the deal to jointly build a new stadium at the Meadowlands with the New York Giants, the Jets agreed to move their headquarters to the Garden State from Hofstra University on Long Island.

A final decision, made by the team with the New Jersey Sports & Exposition Authority, is expected by March 1.

The authority plans to either purchase 20 acres or enter into a long-term lease for the site, to include a 110,000-square-foot building and one indoor and three outdoor football fields.


The Jets sought land that would be easy to develop within 20 miles of the Meadowlands and Newark Liberty International Airport, yet accessible to Manhattan and near a range of housing, hotels and medical facilities.

Jets president Jay Cross said the team considered more than 40 properties.

The move from Hempstead is expected to generate more than $10 million each year in new taxes, according to the Jets.

George Zoffinger, president and CEO of the sports authority, said his agency will make sure the site makes the most economic sense for New Jersey.

A law approved last month expanded the sports authority's role to buy or lease land for the training facility away from the East Rutherford sports complex where the Giants will continue to practice on a new 20-acre site.

"I'm happy about the Jets possibly coming here," Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy said in a statement. "Jersey City, with its proximity to New York and all the amenities we can offer, is a great fit for the Jets."

Marissa Shorenstein, a spokeswoman for the Jets, said the team hasn't yet determined if it will also develop land surrounding the practice facility.


© 2006 The Jersey Journal
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  #54  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2006, 9:24 PM
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Just Approved

The Jersey City planning board on February 7, 2006 approved K. Hovnanian at 77 Hudson Street.

896 units in two towers
22,000 sf of retail space
901 parking space

http://www.cityofjerseycity.com/cale...7_2006_min.pdf

old plan for the sitehttp://www.77hudson.com/
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  #55  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2006, 1:12 AM
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77 Hudson will be 45 stories each tower the west tower will be rental the east will be condos. The condo tower will be wider like a triangle then the rental tower. The condo will be directly in front of the rental blocking most of the views.

Here is a pic for you the construction at the bottom is A Condos project and the one next to the Power House is the Trump project. It's hard to tell because of the snow but the A Condos project is way ahead of Trump.

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  #56  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2006, 6:23 PM
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Journal Square: Harwoods see towers in place of Tawil blights

A family with deep roots in Jersey City has signed a contract to purchase most of the properties on a key block in Journal Square, and is likely to be named the site's designated developer, city officials said yesterday.

The family-owned firm, led by Scott Harwood, is purchasing all Journal Square properties owned by Ralph Tawil Jr., an investor who owns roughly 80 percent of the block next to the PATH Transportation Center, including the defunct Hotel on the Square.

Having racked up nearly $4 million in building and fire code fines - and in the process of demolishing several of these properties - the New York City-based Tawil is apparently ready to leave town.

Harwood, whose roots in Jersey City stretch back three generations, signed a contract to purchase the Tawil properties in January, the developer and city officials said yesterday.

Harwood's vision for the site: Two mixed-use high-rise towers, which would include apartments, retail stores, parking and, possibly, a hotel.

"There is no reason that Journal Square, which arrived much earlier (in economic importance to the city) than the waterfront, cannot be renewed," said Harwood, who with his son, Scott, and nephew, Brett, owns two Journal Square parking lots, is part-owner of the recently opened State Theater apartment complex.

Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy is pleased a hometown developer is taking on the job.

In the past few weeks, Harwood, who wants to start construction next January, has presented his plans for the Square to Healy and commissioners at the city's redevelopment agency.

Chris Fiore, acting interim director of the redevelopment agency, said the Harwoods would likely be named the "designated developer" for the site at the agency's next meeting on March 21.
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  #57  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2006, 8:58 PM
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Trump Upgrades facade

Item #10 changes to building
http://www.cityofjerseycity.com/cale...ry_28_2006.pdf

February 28,2006 Jersey City planning board approved changes to Trump Building.



From: Real Estate Weekly
Title: DeWitt Tishman gets the job at Trump Towers in Jersey.
Publication: Real Estate Weekly
Issue: Sept 28, 2005

With Donald Trump on board, the new owners retained DeWitt Tishman, asking the New York City-based firm to make the design changes necessary to transform the project into a development that reflects the high standards of the Trump Organization.

"This is a very high profile assignment for us," said Peter DeWitt, a company principal. In a few short months, the firm, working with the Trump Organization and Metro Homes, made some design modifications that they believe will make the property unique to the Jersey City waterfront area.

Some of the changes from the original plan include a cast stone facade in place of brick. DeWitt noted that cast stone was used with great success at Trump Place Riverside in Manhattan. In addition, cast stone spandrels with distinctive Art Deco detailing will decorate the space above and below the apartment windows. The windows themselves were changed from double hung to sliders.

In addition, a number of alterations were made to the interior finishes at the Trump Plaza: Jersey City. A key design element retained from the original plan, DeWitt said, was the stepped floor plan of the towers, which provides expansive corner views of Manhattan from most of the nine apartments on each floor. Apartments in the upper reaches of the buildings benefit from panoramic views of the entire region, with premium three-bedroom residences on the top floors utilizing building setbacks as private terraces.

Some of the other noteworthy design elements to be featured at Trump Plaza: Jersey City include: monumental stone piers that define the lobby entrance, a stately seven-story base that mediates between street level and the tower above and rusticated piers that soar the full height of the building to a distinctive crown defined by setbacks and deeply set windows.
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Old Posted Feb 28, 2006, 9:07 PM
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HARBORSIDE'S NEW TENANT - Financial firm to bring 300 jobs


Citco Fund Services, a leading investment management company, is leaving Manhattan for Jersey City.

Citco executives say they will move as many as 300 employees from their offices on Madison Avenue to Harborside Plaza 10 on the Jersey City waterfront by the end of the year.

"We got an offer for a Grade A building in a great location that is near where all our clients are based," said Jay Peller, managing director for Citco Fund Services. "We'll be moving our back- and middle-office operations there, and some of our technology services. Jersey City is a very good location for us."

The deal continues the growth of the financial industry in Jersey City, which has been holding its own in the battle with downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn for attracting companies looking for relief from skyrocketing rents in Midtown.

In the current buyer's market, the deal is a major coup for American Financial Realty Trust, the Pennsylvania-based real estate investment trust that controls the 70,000 square feet at Harborside Plaza where Citco will move.

"This was a deal for continuous space that we were able to negotiate in two and a half weeks where we could give them one of the best locations on the waterfront," said Michael Weil, vice president of sales at American Financial, which controls 1,100 buildings, totaling roughly 40 million square feet, in the United States.

Citco Fund Services handles the administrative work for more than 1,700 hedge funds. Among its varied services, the company settles trades and sends investors portfolio updates.

Peller said most of Citco's clients in the region are in New York or southern Connecticut. Citco was located across from the World Trade Center until September 2001, then moved to Midtown three months later.

Moving to Jersey City will give the company significant savings on rent. Rents on the Jersey City waterfront are in the $30-to-$35-per-square-foot range, compared with $75 and up in Midtown Manhattan.

"The economics factor into it, but this is the right building in the right location close to the city," Peller said.

© 2006 The Jersey Journal
© 2006 NJ.com All Rights Reserved.
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  #59  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2006, 3:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macmini
77 Hudson will be 45 stories each tower the west tower will be rental the east will be condos. The condo tower will be wider like a triangle then the rental tower. The condo will be directly in front of the rental blocking most of the views.

Here is a pic for you the construction at the bottom is A Condos project and the one next to the Power House is the Trump project. It's hard to tell because of the snow but the A Condos project is way ahead of Trump.

Great location. Downtown Jersey City definitely needs more density.
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  #60  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 9:51 PM
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The new design for the Trump Plaza



New Design vs. Old Design
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