HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations

About The Ads  This week the ad company used in the forum will be monitoring activity and doing some tests to identify any problems which users may be experiencing. If at any time this week you get pop-ups, redirects, etc. as a result of ads please let us know by sending an email to forum@skyscraperpage.com or post in the ads complaint thread. Thank you for your participation.


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2005, 4:14 PM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
SHANGHAI, Huangpu river redevelopment

SHANGHAI HUANGPU RIVER BANKS REDEVELOPMENT

Due to Shanghai's incredible construction boom, old days suburbial industries are now trapped among the quickly expending city dowtown. The Huangpu river redevelopment plan intends to relocate these shipyards, factories and warehouses in order to give back access to the river banks. In a few years, parks and walkways will stands there giving new angles to enjoy Shanghai's skyline. Everything should be completed before te 2010 World Expo.

These two recents aerial views only show the most central yards, from north to south :

- The ship yard that stood next to the Lujiazui CBD has been demolished. The land that has been cleared is huge.
- The North Bund redevelopment in the Hongkou district.
- The south part of the Bund (close to the "old" city and the YuYuan garden)
- A (still active) coal dump right in front of the Shimao Riviera Garden residentials (a luxury residential area).

April 2005



June 2005






The Lujiazui shipyard

May 2004, from the Oriental Pearl



May 2005, from the Oriental Pearl



June 2005, from the JinMao



July 2005, from the Oriental Pearl




Different plans and renderings for the zone that were posted on the chinese cameraunion forum. I hope the buildings planned there will be high enough to add some more density behind the actual towers circling of the Central Green garden. By now, from some angles, it's too much of a toothless mouth.










North Bund

November 2004, from the Oriental Pearl



Full resolution : http://www.worldisround.com/hosted/16/503/440_o.jpg

November 2004, from the Oriental Pearl



Full resolution : http://www.worldisround.com/hosted/16/503/441_o.jpg

November 2004, from the Oriental Pearl



Full resolution : http://www.worldisround.com/hosted/16/503/442_o.jpg

June 29th 2005, from the Oriental Pearl


Full resolution : http://www.worldisround.com/hosted/17/391/61_o.jpg

Demolitions pix :



Old Hongkou ghost :




November 2004, a bad pic (wrong hour for the angle) I took from the north end of the Yard. An agressive guard never let me climb the wall to take a better pic but it helps imaginating how great the view on both Puxi and Pudong skylines will be from the park walkway. It's not a bad idea to build the cruise ship terminal there, tourists will be very impressed.



Full resolution : http://www.worldisround.com/hosted/16/489/639_o.jpg

Same area in april 2005




All the models and renderings we already saw for this project were just master plans from the different competitors, not the actual projects from the winners. I'm still collecting information about the North Bund redevelopment and I'll post it later.



South Bund

These two recent views from the JinMao show the whole area in two parts. The former warehouses has been demolished, no construction activities yet.





I don't know exactly what has been planned fot the bank itself there. An extension of the Bund walkway ? A garden ? What is already obvious is that all buildings are been recladded in order to make them look older, probably with the idea of creating a sort of continuity with the historical Bund. This habit of messing with history really makes me ill at ease, kind of Orwell's "1984" nightmare came true.

All the following pix were collected from the cameraunion forum (moyan808, I think, thanks to him)

A model :



The already recladded buildings :



The latest buildings been redesigned (the residential midrise on the left was very ugly)

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2005, 5:58 PM
Jaroslaw's Avatar
Jaroslaw Jaroslaw is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Seoul
Posts: 1,792
Thanks for the great update and amazing news...
__________________
Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2005, 8:20 PM
The Chemist's Avatar
The Chemist The Chemist is offline
恭喜发财!
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: 中国上海/Shanghai
Posts: 8,660
Ah, so that's what used to be on that vacant lot in Lujiazui. I was up in the Jin Mao and Pearl Towers, and I couldn't figure out what used to be on that land, considering how big the lot was. I can't wait to see what this redevelopment looks like when it's finished.

Shanghai will be an even better city than it is now by the time it hosts the Expo in 2010.
__________________
"Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature." - Michael Faraday (1791-1867)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2005, 7:42 AM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
Quote:
Shanghai will be an even better city than it is now by the time it hosts the Expo in 2010.
These developments are really going to change Shanghai much. Expect many new angles on the city skyline. The riverside Park in the Lujiazui zone already gives an idea of what Shanghai's banks are going to be : very pleasant and quiet places (no traffic) from where you will be able to contemplate the city.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2005, 5:36 PM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
NORTH BUND REDEVELOPMENT

Though we already saw many projects for the North Bund zone redevelopment, I think no precise renderings or models of the actual project ever surfaced out. Those were only master plans from the urbanists and architects in competion. What we now know for sure now is that the three winners are the New York-based architecture firm HLW INTERNATIONAL, the COX GROUP of Australia and RTKL ASSOCIATES of Baltimore.

I still have technical problems with the worldisdround server so I can't display pix of the COX Group and HLW master plans right now. For a start, here is the RTKL project (with the underconstruction North Bund twins, we already see some changes occured) :


RTKL associates

"The city of Shanghai held a competition to find the best master plan for a massive renovation of its North Bund district - a region full of dilapidated warehouses, docks and residential complexes. RTKL's winning design - deemed a "beautiful balance of romance and rationality" - turned the area into a shipping hub, a business center and a historic tourism spot.

Under RTKL's plan, the Central Business District is made up of professional services that form an important 'cradle' for creating employment opportunities. In order to compensate for the lack of public transportation, the team designed an accessible subway line so that everyone who works or lives in the area will be within ten-minute walking distance of transportation. In the shipping business area, an oval-shaped central green area will allow visitors to relax, while providing a scenic link to a nearby yacht club. A 200-meter-tall futuristic-looking ferris wheel - the "Shanghai Eye" - will provide a modern contrast to several historic temples and a preserved prison."

source : http://www.rtkl.com/cs_shanghai_north_bund_district.asp

"... our urban design for Shanghai’s North Bund district, an historic district of dilapidated warehouses that will be transformed into a lively urban district that resembles lower Manhattan".

Harold Adams, chairman of RTKL Associates Inc

 



Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2005, 7:09 PM
colemonkee's Avatar
colemonkee colemonkee is offline
Ridin' into the sunset
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 7,585
^The tower in the middle of that last picture reminds of Nina Towers in HK, especially the top.
__________________
"Then each time Fleetwood would be not so much overcome by remorse as bedazzled at having been shown the secret backlands of wealth, and how sooner or later it depended on some act of murder, seldom limited to once."

Against the Day, Thomas Pynchon
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2005, 6:15 AM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308


Yes you're right. Though it is very sketchy, this rendering which features the North Bund twins might be the most up to date I ever saw. The higher tower in the background might be +200 meters high.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2005, 6:51 AM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
NORTH BUND REDEVELOPMENT


COX Group

Project Dates: Competition Submission June 2002
Client:Shanghai North Bund Developing Authority
Size: 3.14 sq km

The Cox Groups' masterplan seeks to balance the development of North Bund as a prestigious, mixed commercial, residential and retail area, while respecting its diverse economic, social and heritage context. The proposed masterplan identifies the potential of two new subway lines to the North Bund area, the southern orientation to both the view and the riverfront, and the existing urban fabric, which recalls its social and cultural history of Shanghai.

The masterplan provides major nodes along the new proposed M2 subway line, each has been planned with its own functions and characters, and as a whole, the masterplan seeks to enhance the waterfront area of Shanghai city and in particularly to link the "central triangle".

Given its proximity to the Bund and existing CBD of Shanghai, the western precinct of North Bund has the opportunity to turn into a unique, highly accessible and highly desirable place to establish higher order employment, complemented by top class hotels for business visitors and tourists.



Tiny ones :





Another COX Group link about the whole Huangpu river redevelopment (tiny renderings too).

Last edited by avcellvs; Aug 13, 2005 at 5:08 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2005, 6:12 AM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
NORTH BUND REDEVELOPMENT


HLW

Some reflections (a PDF document) about contemporary chinese urbanism, by Christopher Choa of HLW Shanghai. Short but very interesting.



Full resolution : http://www.worldisround.com/hosted/17/433/61_o.jpg







An encounter with Christopher Choa . A may 2004 article, New York Times :

SALVAGING JEWISH HERITAGE IN CHINA, BLOCK BY BLOCK, By Sheridan Prasso  

 
Every morning at 5 Christopher Choa gets up for his daily run, logging 8 to 10 miles on his trip to and from the North Bund, which includes the old Jewish ghetto in Shanghai.

A New York architect who moved to Shanghai three years ago, Mr. Choa became enchanted by the area and its history. So when he learned that the North Bund was facing redevelopment, he decided to try to save as much of the old ghetto as possible.

"The history of the Jews in Shanghai is so compelling," said Mr. Choa, who is Roman Catholic, but whose great-grandmother was a Sephardic Jew. "It's really worth preserving. It's part of the fabric."

The ghetto, in what was once the American and then the International Settlement and is now called the North Bund, harbored more than 20,000 Jews who fled Nazi Europe from 1933 to 1941 and another 5,000 to 10,000 who fled Stalin's Russia before that. Viewers of Steven Spielberg's 1987 film "Empire of the Sun" got a glimpse of the area. Known in Chinese as Hongkou (or Hongkew), the ghetto was a haven for stateless refugees in a city that for years did not require a visa to enter.

Almost all the Jews, except a few descendants of mixed parentage, resettled in New York, Los Angeles, Tel Aviv and elsewhere as the Communists took power in 1949. They left behind a charming neighborhood with row houses, schools, a synagogue, a park and even a Little Vienna Cafe. The district is now inhabited by working-class Chinese, some of whom live in rooms lighted by a single hanging bulb and with three or more families sharing a kitchen and bathroom. When Shanghai officials announced urban renewal plans for the North Bund almost two years ago, they said they envisioned turning the area into a masterpiece of the 21st century, a modern business and residential district with skyscrapers, apartment buildings, cruise ship docks and even an enormous Ferris wheel.

The gleaming metropolis that city planners had in mind did not leave room for a quaint old neighborhood. Officials had earmarked about 400 historic buildings for preservation citywide, but in the old ghetto only the Ohel Moishe Synagogue and a block or so of row houses made the list.

Mr. Choa had a different idea. He and his New York-based architecture firm, HLW International, entered a competition to design a master plan for the new North Bund. HLW, along with two other firms, the Cox Group of Australia and RTKL Associates of Baltimore, won.

Mr. Choa, who had already restored the Art Deco lobbies of the Park Hotel and the Peace Hotel annex, architectural jewels from the era when Shanghai was known as the Paris of the East, has experience in environmentally sensitive design. The centerpiece of his plan is creating a memorial park around the synagogue, where there are now buildings, and bringing in gravestones of Jewish residents from former cemeteries. He says his idea would symbolically link the park to the Huangpu River on one end and an ornate Buddhist temple on the other.

Yet creating the park would mean saving only a few more of the ghetto buildings than the city required, Mr. Choa said. By tearing down some of the row houses, developers, who would be chosen by the government, could build more profitable high-rises.

"The choice was to keep the housing or put in a park," he said. "Park space was so underrepresented. I thought the park was more important."

"I agonized a lot about what to do in this area," he added, calling the decision a "Faustian bargain."

Mr. Choa said that no matter what he proposed, much of the ghetto could be torn down anyway. "There's no guarantee that even a municipal-preserved building will stay," he said.

But momentum is growing to preserve the entire neighborhood. An alternate plan has been drawn up by two Canadians, Ian Leventhal and Thomas M. Rado, who are Jewish. They formed a company called Living Bridge, which is trying to raise $450 million to preserve at least 50 ghetto buildings in a nine-block area.

"Our plan calls for the restoration of all the buildings of significant architectural importance, such as row houses, the Broadway Theater, and of course the Ohel Moishe Synagogue," Mr. Leventhal wrote in an email message, though he declined to say how much money has been raised.

Mr. Leventhal and Mr. Rado, who are working with government-appointed preservation professors from a Shanghai university and a Toronto architect, made a presentation to district officials in Hongkou last Monday. If district officials can be convinced of the financial viability of the Leventhal-Rado restoration plan — which also calls for a boutique hotel, an extensive memorial park and a car-free pedestrian zone — it would then go to the Shanghai city government for consideration when they auction the area to developers.

"In principle the government is supportive, and our next step is to do a more detailed version for presentation early this summer," Mr. Leventhal said, adding that he hoped to set a precedent for heritage conservation and development.

The Ohel Moishe Synagogue is already a tourist attraction. No longer used for worship (Judiasm is not officially recognized by the Chinese government), the synagogue operates as a small museum and Jewish cultural center supported by donations. A museum plaque listing visitors during the last few years includes photos of Hillary Rodham Clinton, former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright, Chancellor Gerhard Schröder of Germany and former Israeli Prime Ministers Yitzhak Rabin and Benjamin Netanyahu.

Because Shanghai has not decided which redevelopment path to take, no one knows what, if any, buildings beyond the synagogue and the rowhouse block will be preserved. All Mr. Choa, Mr. Leventhal and Mr. Rado can do is keep urging government officials to consider the tourism potential of the district so that they in turn might transfer that pressure onto future developers.

"You're just trying to save as much as possible," Mr. Choa said.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2005, 6:37 AM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
North Bund redevelopment

August 10th 2005, from the Bund. I don't think this under construction tower fit any of the projects...

http://image26.webshots.com/26/8/1/3/389580103lGeFIt_ph.jpg
Very high resolution :
http://image26.webshots.com/26/8/1/3/389580103lGeFIt_fs.jpg
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2005, 12:03 PM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
HLW proposal for North Bund redevelopment

Bigger renderings and new ones from HLW Shanghai site :














Two examples of the historic buildings that HLW wants to save :

The formerly Braodway theater (now a restaurant) :



Old row houses of the jewish ghetto :

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2005, 3:43 PM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
New Environmental Masterplan for Pudong Pearl Park

Another HLW project including two new midrises next to the Shanghai Customs Building (the one with cupola):

CLIENT: Shanghai Oriental Pearl (Group) Co.,Ltd
AREA: 1,800,000 sm
land area. 31,510sm new program area
SCOPE OF SERVICES: urban design, architecture, landscape architecture

The Pearl Park area of Pudong (Xiao Lu Jia Zui) incorporates the largest concentration of destination attractions in Shanghai. This major waterfront crescent along the Huangpu River incorporates museums, tourist attractions, retail sites, hotels, and parks.

However, many environmental and programmatic obstacles prevented Xiao Lu Jia Zui from realizing its cultural and commercial potential. HLW proposed a new, world-class, environmental masterplan that maximizes this area’s great potential and creates a truly attractive commercial and cultural destination for visitors and residents, a true expression of the City of Shanghai. The design solution emphasizes the expansion of the public domain. Specifically, the masterplan rationalizes vehicular movement, introduces pedestrian-friendly circulation, introduces optimal arrangements of retail zones, creates new recreation and dining venues, and makes strategic connections to pre-existing but previously isolated park areas.

















Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2005, 4:08 PM
colemonkee's Avatar
colemonkee colemonkee is offline
Ridin' into the sunset
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 7,585
I like both the park Masterplan and the North Bund development. A good balance of tall buildings and greenspace in both. Some of the buildings in the North Bund proposal remind me of Cira Center in Philadelpia, which is a good thing.
__________________
"Then each time Fleetwood would be not so much overcome by remorse as bedazzled at having been shown the secret backlands of wealth, and how sooner or later it depended on some act of murder, seldom limited to once."

Against the Day, Thomas Pynchon
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2005, 4:38 PM
Fabb's Avatar
Fabb Fabb is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Paris
Posts: 9,018


^Come on, this is not Shanghai.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2005, 3:25 PM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
^ Yes, I don't like this overdrawn square filled with trees and circled with these small town lowrises of no architectural ambition.

We must not take too seriously these proposals, these are only masterplans. All of them features :

- a park and a walkway by the river,
- a yatch port whose location varies according to the projects,
- three nodes probably located where the future metro stations will be constructed :
* a cluster of (not so) highrises behind the North Bund twins,
* a big square behind the North Bund Tower (on some of the renderings it has quite melted down, half of the initially planned height I guess)
* and a third around the cruise ship terminal.

What will exactly be constructed we don't really know by now.


Do you remember that 320m John Portman's proposal for the cruise ship terminal ? It's not on any of these three projects.



As you can see on this pic, this tower under construction behind the North Bund twins was not planned in any of the winning projects renderings neither :



Full resolution : http://www.worldisround.com/hosted/18/48/496_o.jpg
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Aug 23, 2005, 9:40 AM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
Lujiazui ship yard area redevelopment

Two renderings that were posted on the cameraunion forum with a given maximal height of 200 meters (the higher of the three pair of twins. Too bad the pix are truncated. What is this strange "boat under contruction" shaped building ?



Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2005, 11:03 AM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
This model is actually exposed at the Shanghai urban planning musem. It gives a good idea of the scale of this construction yard. The greening of the Huangpu river banks might be quite realistic but details of the model seem already out of date (see Lujiazui CBD buildings).

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2005, 1:43 AM
phillyskyline's Avatar
phillyskyline phillyskyline is offline
Monomania w/ Skyscrapers
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: In the sky with other skyscrapers
Posts: 2,557
I cant wait to see this amazing city in 5 years....
__________________
"OK gang, you know the rules, no humping, no licking, no sniffing hineys."
Harry Dunne
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2005, 2:19 PM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
North Bund redevelopment

September 7th 2005, from the Bund. First time a crane is up there. May be just for construction of the park (which is partly extending above the Huangpu river).

http://image50.webshots.com/50/5/22/50/445252250febWHM_ph.jpg
Full resolution :
http://image50.webshots.com/50/5/22/50/445252250febWHM_fs.jpg
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2005, 3:14 PM
avcellvs avcellvs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,308
North Bund redevelopment

September 17th 2005, from the Oriental Pearl.

http://image52.webshots.com/152/0/94/15/457209415nXhJMi_fs.jpg

Here is what the crane is for. I don't think any building has been planned so close to the river, so these might be preparation works before digging underground floors under the park.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 7:30 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.