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  #2941  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2011, 3:19 PM
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ardecila ardecila is offline
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^^ Far, far superior to Subway or Quiznos. The French bread used is actually similar to Ledenheimer's, only less chewy with a narrower loaf. The meats used are pretty top-quality... only thing I don't like is the tuna.

The nice thing is that you can get plain slim sandwiches (just meat and cheese) and the price is comparable to a McDonalds sandwich but far, far more tasty and healthy.

Too bad the location is on Veterans at Clearview. If they were in the city, I'd be their best customer.
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  #2942  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2011, 4:19 PM
FrenchTwins FrenchTwins is offline
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Just came across this awesome sketch from Waggonner & Ball of what the Lafitte Corridor would look like if Bayou St. John were allowed to stretch down it (as it once did many decades ago and prehistorically). I think this is an awesome idea. Bringing more waterfront to the city would be a huge property value boost to these neighborhoods, and give NOLA a more Venetian feel. Plus, the whole concept would be relatively pretty cheap, and reduce the heat island effect for a lot of property.

http://www.archdaily.com/151846/comp...s/#more-151846

Here is a bunch more images and an overview of the proposal. I was thinking that this might cause a lot more standing water for mosquitos to breed, but it sounds like they are looking at making the water circulate like some kind of big lazy river I guess. Pretty cool idea I'd say.
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  #2943  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2011, 5:21 PM
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The water on Bayou St John seems to move enough to prevent the mosquito situation. I think its a great idea to bring more water features into the city. Just as long as this looks like a nice, natural canal and not a culvert or ditch then Im all for it. Could you imagine kayaking from the French Quarter to the Lake?

Good article regarding the renovation of the Convention Centers oldest Halls:

http://www.mccno.com/newsroom/new-or...r-renovation-/




Last edited by tennis1400; Aug 4, 2011 at 5:57 PM.
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  #2944  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2011, 6:26 PM
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Found this online too and Im unsure what this is about? Website seems to be recent!

http://shownd.com/tellonedesign/2782...Boutique-Hotel





Rendering of 301 St Claude Senior Housing



Federal City Master Plan Rendering


Last edited by tennis1400; Aug 4, 2011 at 6:37 PM.
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  #2945  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2011, 6:47 PM
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More water features would be really nice. Especially since the lake is so underutilized.
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  #2946  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2011, 10:35 PM
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New Orleans City Council's 'yes' vote essentially defers action on Woolworth site

http://www.nola.com/politics/index.s...cil_essen.html

The New Orleans City Council voted this afternoon to approve developer Praveen Kailas' plans for a high-rise apartment building at Canal and North Rampart streets....



Great news. I disagree with the article, the vote is far from 'meaningless'. This project finally picking up steam.
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  #2947  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2011, 2:41 AM
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Originally Posted by tennis1400 View Post
Found this online too and Im unsure what this is about? Website seems to be recent!

http://shownd.com/tellonedesign/2782...Boutique-Hotel





Rendering of 301 St Claude Senior Housing



Federal City Master Plan Rendering

That is a fascinating-looking project, but the renderings are by a 4th year Tulane student, doesn't look like it's an actual developer's proposal. Too bad. Something like that would be a great addition to the WD.
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  #2948  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2011, 9:16 PM
polemic polemic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrenchTwins View Post
http://www.archdaily.com/151846/comp...s/#more-151846

Here is a bunch more images and an overview of the proposal. I was thinking that this might cause a lot more standing water for mosquitos to breed, but it sounds like they are looking at making the water circulate like some kind of big lazy river I guess. Pretty cool idea I'd say.
What if instead of an extension of Bayou St. John it was converted into (this country's only) urban kayaking course. It could pump water out of the Mississippi and empty into Bayou St. John on the opposite side. Artificial boulders and rapids could be added in. A horizontal elevator could then bring rider and kayak back to the top of the course on the other side. I'm not quite sure how you would get enough elevation on the course to make it into white water, but maybe it's possible? New Orleans seems to have perfect year-round kayaking weather and plenty of water to go around. In event of a storm, the course could be used to channel water out of mid-city (though admittedly, it would probably overload the Bayou). Plus, NOLA would have a unique tourist attraction that would target a growing group of tourists that currently would bypass the city (action sporting enthusiasts).

Ok, so honestly this idea is a bit nuts, but my problem with the Lafite Greenway is just that it might not be unique enough. I definitely don't think it's unique enough to attract large numbers of tourists. It's just too hot and stick in New Orleans for most of them to motivate them to take a long walk outside that doesn't involve a booze run. So the question is: will locals use it? And I think the answer is that there won't be enough usage to make most people feel safe, and once people don't feel safe on the greenway, it's unlikely to be a huge success. Obviously, I shouldn't be negative: a underused greenway is better than no greenway at all. But that's my two cents.
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  #2949  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2011, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by polemic View Post
What if instead of an extension of Bayou St. John it was converted into (this country's only) urban kayaking course. It could pump water out of the Mississippi and empty into Bayou St. John on the opposite side. Artificial boulders and rapids could be added in. A horizontal elevator could then bring rider and kayak back to the top of the course on the other side. I'm not quite sure how you would get enough elevation on the course to make it into white water, but maybe it's possible? New Orleans seems to have perfect year-round kayaking weather and plenty of water to go around. In event of a storm, the course could be used to channel water out of mid-city (though admittedly, it would probably overload the Bayou). Plus, NOLA would have a unique tourist attraction that would target a growing group of tourists that currently would bypass the city (action sporting enthusiasts).

Ok, so honestly this idea is a bit nuts, but my problem with the Lafite Greenway is just that it might not be unique enough. I definitely don't think it's unique enough to attract large numbers of tourists. It's just too hot and stick in New Orleans for most of them to motivate them to take a long walk outside that doesn't involve a booze run. So the question is: will locals use it? And I think the answer is that there won't be enough usage to make most people feel safe, and once people don't feel safe on the greenway, it's unlikely to be a huge success. Obviously, I shouldn't be negative: a underused greenway is better than no greenway at all. But that's my two cents.
The Greenway is narrow enough that you're never really surrounded by parkland; you always have the city on two sides. So I don't think safety is an issue, like it is in City Park where nobody can hear you scream.

As for attracting locals... I think that gets at a broader question about how the city should develop. I think it's foolish to keep relying on tourism to save the entire city. If you spread the tourism peanut butter too thin, then the city will lose its critical mass and cease to be a popular tourist destination. The city should confine touristy things to the Quarter/CBD/Warehouse District.

In the rest of the city, investments should be made with the end goal of attracting new residents and keeping old ones. That means investments in schools, parks, libraries, and other quality-of-life things... and the city also needs to work with the private sector to bring in the needed retail, not in 2-3 huge strip centers, but at the neighborhood scale. Let's get some Wal-Mart Expresses to open up and help revitalize the old neighborhood commercial districts along St. Claude, Broad/Washington, Canal/Broad, Felicity, OC Haley, etc. Improving the quality and design of roads is very important as well... and once you're doing this, things like bike paths and bus lanes are just a few cans of paint.

A whitewater course is a foolish megaproject that will saddle the city with one more white elephant. Imagine a weed-choked concrete flume cutting through Mid-City... it would look like South LA or something.

I don't entirely disagree with the notion of regional amenities being built along the Greenway, but definitely not taking up the whole thing. For example... if the park incorporated an interpretive center that explained the unique condition of the city, in environmental and historical terms. Sorta like this. Or this. Both are small museums integrated into a bigger landscape. That Learning Village posted a few pages ago was a good example of what this might look like in New Orleans.
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Last edited by ardecila; Aug 5, 2011 at 10:19 PM.
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  #2950  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2011, 4:09 PM
FrenchTwins FrenchTwins is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polemic View Post
What if instead of an extension of Bayou St. John it was converted into (this country's only) urban kayaking course. It could pump water out of the Mississippi and empty into Bayou St. John on the opposite side. Artificial boulders and rapids could be added in. A horizontal elevator could then bring rider and kayak back to the top of the course on the other side. I'm not quite sure how you would get enough elevation on the course to make it into white water, but maybe it's possible? New Orleans seems to have perfect year-round kayaking weather and plenty of water to go around. In event of a storm, the course could be used to channel water out of mid-city (though admittedly, it would probably overload the Bayou). Plus, NOLA would have a unique tourist attraction that would target a growing group of tourists that currently would bypass the city (action sporting enthusiasts).

Ok, so honestly this idea is a bit nuts, but my problem with the Lafite Greenway is just that it might not be unique enough. I definitely don't think it's unique enough to attract large numbers of tourists. It's just too hot and stick in New Orleans for most of them to motivate them to take a long walk outside that doesn't involve a booze run. So the question is: will locals use it? And I think the answer is that there won't be enough usage to make most people feel safe, and once people don't feel safe on the greenway, it's unlikely to be a huge success. Obviously, I shouldn't be negative: a underused greenway is better than no greenway at all. But that's my two cents.
Here's an example of what I think could be done with sections of the Greenway. Make certain "checkpoints" or gathering places that people will flock to and eventually you will have people wanting to ride their bikes from one checkpoint to the other,etc:



http://inhabitat.com/seoul-recovers-...an-urban-park/

While the park in Seoul is much different urban context, it is these water features in the public spaces that make people want to spend time there in the summer. Maybe some sections could be connected with a stream running through the middle. If it is made long enough, maybe even consider paddle boats? I know this is all dreaming, but why would anyone want to make possibly the last undeveloped large public urban space in the city just meh?
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  #2951  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2011, 7:10 PM
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That's a great idea, something that is being considered in Baton Rouge, to a lesser extent. New Orleans could much better support it. Its a great idea to capture that young professional population base as the areas around it are improved. It would be great if it was modeled after that greenway loop that Atlanta is working on.
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  #2952  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2011, 8:23 PM
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  #2953  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2011, 11:36 PM
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Hate the diagonal orientation. It's so damn suburban.
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  #2954  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2011, 8:47 AM
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Hate the diagonal orientation. It's so damn suburban.
Agree. New Orleans doesn't need that BS.
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  #2955  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2011, 5:30 PM
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Donald Trump should have just downsized his high rise condo and build a luxury apartment condo complex.
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  #2956  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2011, 2:42 AM
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Hotel Le Cirque

http://www.nola.com/business/index.s..._relaunch.html



I hate everything about this new renovation - especially about them removing the colored lights from the facade. I don't think it's too "Las Vegas". I thought it was a nice change of pace for New Orleans and a beautiful contrast to the neo-classic monument it backgrounds.
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  #2957  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2011, 3:34 AM
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Removal of the lights is a bad idea. I did think it added something nice to the city in the evening.
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  #2958  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2011, 3:38 AM
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Quote:
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http://www.nola.com/business/index.s..._relaunch.html



I hate everything about this new renovation - especially about them removing the colored lights from the facade. I don't think it's too "Las Vegas". I thought it was a nice change of pace for New Orleans and a beautiful contrast to the neo-classic monument it backgrounds.
I actually really like this renovation. The modern renovation will help define the neighborhood. The new restaurant/bar and lounge will bring more people to the area. I like how the owner sees potential in the area, a kind of antithesis to the French Quarter. Lee Circle has been underused for too long. I also like his idea of having an international music scene, something more than just jazz.

Also, it seems the building will still have lights except it will only shine orange, rather than cheesy Christmas colors or sports teams colors.
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  #2959  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2011, 3:45 AM
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This isn't anything big but I think it says a lot of how NOLA is starting to be seen in the eyes of outside investors.

http://www.bestofneworleans.com/blog...saturday-aug-6
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  #2960  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2011, 2:19 PM
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Removal of the lights is a bad idea. I did think it added something nice to the city in the evening.
I agree I actually like the lights but if it stays orange Im ok with that to. Hotel is seriously in need of an upgrade so this is overall great news. Reality is Lee Circle wont reach its potential til both gas station are gone.
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