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  #21  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2014, 4:18 PM
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I suppose it's nitpicking, OutlawImages, but the railroad didn't "arrive" in the neighborhood in the 1870s--the Central Pacific Railroad started about 200 feet west of the Ebner Hotel at the foot of Front Street in January 1863

No worries, I wouldn't post in error intentionally and you have far more research knowledge than I do.

My source was a quick look at Wiki so could be wrong for sure

And I am being picky I guess about the "replica" historic building, just assumed like most people probably that they were rebuilt versions of at least portions of the original

But to see the condition of some of them in 1960s I understand they were neglected to a point of no return
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  #22  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2014, 6:17 PM
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Western star Tom Mix comes to Sacramento

Legendary western star Tom Mix and his traveling circus came to Sacramento in 1936 during his national tour

Looks like the local kids loved the show and even dressed up to see their hero



The parade coming down Kst and going past Brueners on the left, and Hotel Central in the background





Sacramento in 7th week - April 22 1936
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  #23  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2014, 1:03 PM
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Well, I started out as a Sacramento nightlife enthusiast, about 40-50 years after these ads were run! It's interesting to see the parallels between the way nightclubs are presented and advertised through the years, and researching what happened to people who were part of the local scene: music, art, nightlife, entertainment, bars and restaurants, promotion. Some only operated in that milieu, others went on to other things. Plus, it's kind of fun to think about folks 50-100 years ago going out to clubs to listen and dance to the latest music and make the scene, but otherwise basically doing the same things nightclubbers do today... I'm also interested because they represent a counter-narrative to the common perception of Sacramento as quiet little white-bread farm town. As this sort of material gets easier to find and share, that traditional narrative breaks down, revealing the story of a city that was far more lively, diverse, energetic, and entertaining than we are led to believe....
After my parents and sister moved to Sacramento, when I was visiting my sister dragged me out to the Cattle Club (later Bojangles and now I think it's a sports bar), which is every bit as notable as any historic downtown venue, within its own context and era. At the time, every alternative/grunge band worth its salt played the Cattle Club, before they got famous--Nirvana (who famously called it a 'shithole,' but played there more than once), Smashing Pumpkins, Pearl Jam (as themselves and also as "Mookie Blaylock"), Alice In Chains, Pavement and Deftones of course, and I think I remember Tool did too--coolest little club in the world. Ever. Those same bands didn't play San Francisco until they had already made some money. I almost never saw cool bands play in SF, but I saw all the cool bands play at the Cattle Club. Thanks, Sis!
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  #24  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2014, 6:33 PM
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Well hoping everyone is having great holidays with friends and family

I am enjoying mine

So I enjoy the film noir style mystery stuff from the 40s and there is lots of those stories on the La/Hollywood thread that inspired this thread for Sacramento.

You can see all the noir stories and locations about SoCal that inspired this thread for Sacramento here http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...0279&page=1261

So searching for similar stuff like that for Sacramento but unfortunately just not as many stories and media coverage like LA has always had

I did find an unsolved serial killer in Sacramento back in 1941 that I had in my 50 yrs living here never heard of before.

Has anyone heard of the "Mad Killer" Case, I had not. Went unsolved to this day and is cold case filed

http://www.nokilli.com/sacto/1941-killer.htm

All victims were taken from the old sac area when it was the slums of the city and were low income victims.

Only location mentioned is the long gone Al's style shop where a hat was bought

Not much to go on but old newspaper articles that seems to have errors for sure.

Might look into seeing if police reports might be available to see everything they had , could be interested
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  #25  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2014, 5:59 PM
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Originally Posted by fflint View Post
After my parents and sister moved to Sacramento, when I was visiting my sister dragged me out to the Cattle Club (later Bojangles and now I think it's a sports bar), which is every bit as notable as any historic downtown venue, within its own context and era. At the time, every alternative/grunge band worth its salt played the Cattle Club, before they got famous--Nirvana (who famously called it a 'shithole,' but played there more than once), Smashing Pumpkins, Pearl Jam (as themselves and also as "Mookie Blaylock"), Alice In Chains, Pavement and Deftones of course, and I think I remember Tool did too--coolest little club in the world. Ever. Those same bands didn't play San Francisco until they had already made some money. I almost never saw cool bands play in SF, but I saw all the cool bands play at the Cattle Club. Thanks, Sis!
It was Bojangles (a gay dance club) before it was the Cattle Club, and technically it was still Bojangles during the Cattle Club era--Jerry Perry leased the place but they still did dance nights, the Cattle Club was its name for live shows. Definitely a legendary place, many great bands and shows. The bathroom was truly awful, but a disgusting bathroom tends to be a hallmark of every legendary rock & roll venue.
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  #26  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2014, 6:05 PM
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I know the author of the "Mad Killer" article, not sure if he ever did more research to track down further information.

If you want some real-life crime stories from Sacramento, give a listen to the "Unit 99" radio show! It was a "true crime" radio drama of the 1950s. It was unique in that earlier "true crime" radio shows were dramatized, with dialogue retold by actors. Unit 99 carried a high-tech portable reel to reel magnetic tape recorder, so the real police officers and suspects could be recorded in the field. The result is a radio document of crime in Sacramento, a la "Cops," from the "film noir" era. A lot of real locations (nightclubs, bars, businesses, addresses) are described in the radio program.

There are legal/copyright issues with posting historic photos that are held in archive collections, so I'm a bit timid about the images I post here, but there are plenty of photos out there that show off the kind of city that Sacramento was back then--definitely not the quiet, idyllic farm town that many assume it was, but neither was it a crime-ridden sink of pestilence. For the most part, downtown Sacramento was a residential neighborhood, with many families and cultural institutions, albeit ones not appreciated by the powers that were in the 1940s and 50s. I'll post some of those later--including some color pics--that give a different image of downtown than many are used to.
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  #27  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2014, 6:35 PM
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Originally Posted by wburg View Post
I know the author of the "Mad Killer" article, not sure if he ever did more research to track down further information.

If you want some real-life crime stories from Sacramento, give a listen to the "Unit 99" radio show! It was a "true crime" radio drama of the 1950s. It was unique in that earlier "true crime" radio shows were dramatized, with dialogue retold by actors. Unit 99 carried a high-tech portable reel to reel magnetic tape recorder, so the real police officers and suspects could be recorded in the field. The result is a radio document of crime in Sacramento, a la "Cops," from the "film noir" era. A lot of real locations (nightclubs, bars, businesses, addresses) are described in the radio program.

There are legal/copyright issues with posting historic photos that are held in archive collections, so I'm a bit timid about the images I post here, but there are plenty of photos out there that show off the kind of city that Sacramento was back then--definitely not the quiet, idyllic farm town that many assume it was, but neither was it a crime-ridden sink of pestilence. For the most part, downtown Sacramento was a residential neighborhood, with many families and cultural institutions, albeit ones not appreciated by the powers that were in the 1940s and 50s. I'll post some of those later--including some color pics--that give a different image of downtown than many are used to.

Merry Chrismas and Happy New Year Wburg I appreciate the link to the Unit 99, had not found that yet and will be checking it out for sure

The Mad Killer is interesting as a mystery and the limited info from the media reports makes me wonder what might have been found in actually police reports?

I am not one of the murder fans that love or follow that stuff just to clarify, my interest is solely from its connection to Sacramento history, whether bad or not it is history.

The copyright issue - I certainly would never want to violate any copyright for anyone's work. But I am not sure what a copyright covers or whats its limits are (maybe I need to research) but would think it would be more aimed at someone making money off another persons work. I see these photos here as sharing info for our enjoyment.

The LA Noir page they post from various museums etc and just make sure to give credit for the source of the info, and they have 2,000 pages of photos etc
And I will always try and give credit where possible to the copyright holder

But you know more about them than I probably do

Hope there are people enjoying this thread so far and might join in

Last edited by OutlawImages; Jan 6, 2015 at 5:37 AM.
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  #28  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2015, 9:09 PM
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Excellent thread OutlawImages. Keep up the good work!
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  #29  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2015, 7:12 AM
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Excellent thread OutlawImages. Keep up the good work!
Thank you sir, I enjoy your LA thread so hopefully I will do this justice

Honored by your visit
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  #30  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2015, 6:34 PM
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Congratulations

Congratulations on your new Noir site. I am a L.A. Noir fan and always interested in other Ca. cities as well. I will check the site regularly.
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  #31  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2015, 3:51 PM
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Here are a few Sacramento Bee articles about places of interest in Colonial Heights, along Stockton Boulevard. In 1940, a streetcar ran from 55th Street and 21st Avenue downtown via Stockton Boulevard, making Stockton a prime business street and Colonial Heights a popular suburb.

The original streetcar was operated by Central California Traction, an electric interurban railroad who operated between Stockton in Sacramento. In 1933, passenger trains from Stockton stopped, but freight trains and streetcars continued. In 1943, CCT sold their streetcar operation to National City Lines. Colonial Heights was far out in the country when first built out circa 1910, but rapidly grew into a busy suburban neighborhood, and was eventually incorporated into the city as far as 14th Avenue--later incorporations took over the rest of Colonial Heights, but the west side of Stockton along the southern end of Colonial Heights is still Sacramento County.


The Colonial Theatre opened in 1940. It was designed by Herb Goodpastor, who also designed the Tower Theater. Supposedly, Goodpastor's contract for the Tower required that he design no theater within three miles of the Tower, a circle covering all of downtown Sacramento. According to local legend, the Colonial Theatre's site was chosen because it is three miles and one foot from Tower as the crow flies.

The Colonial opened to great fanfare in 1940.

Right next door to the theater was a nightclub and restaurant, the Movie Club--it's the place with the octagonal window in the photo above.

In 1954, the Movie Club became the Circle Club.

Farther down Stockton Boulevard was Frasinetti's, owned by the Frasinetti family, whose vineyard in Florin dates to the 1890s. Frasinetti's opened in 1936 and operated at the prominent corner of Stockton Boulevard and San Francisco Boulevard, the "main street" of the Colonial Heights subdivision, recognizable by its two rows of palm trees, accessible from the Stockton Boulevard streetcar line, which ran until 1946.

In 1954, Frasinetti's became Burich's, owned by the Jim Burich family. Burich was also the operator of a long-standing downtown Sacramento bar, the Equipoise Cafe near 4th and K Street, notorious as a site for underground gambling dens. Burich's was farther out into the county, and could have been a more "family-oriented" place given its location in a suburb--or maybe it was just that much farther from the prying eyes of police who worked the West End?
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  #32  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2015, 4:46 PM
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Great post!!



Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post


The Colonial Theatre opened in 1940. It was designed by Herb Goodpastor, who also designed the Tower Theater. Supposedly, Goodpastor's contract for the Tower required that he design no theater within three miles of the Tower, a circle covering all of downtown Sacramento. According to local legend, the Colonial Theatre's site was chosen because it is three miles and one foot from Tower as the crow flies.

The Colonial opened to great fanfare in 1940.


Loved that post, the Colonial is a great theater , and thankfully it still survives. And Mexican restaurant on right side used to be the "Circle Club"







Amazing how communities names get forgotten in time like Colonial Heights, been here my whole life and never heard of Colonial Heights. But thanks to learning more about my city







Quote:
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Here are a few Sacramento Bee articles about places of interest in Colonial Heights, along Stockton Boulevard. In 1940, a streetcar ran from 55th Street and 21st Avenue downtown via Stockton Boulevard, making Stockton a prime business street and Colonial Heights a popular suburb.

In 1954, the Movie Club became the Circle Club.

Farther down Stockton Boulevard was Frasinetti's, owned by the Frasinetti family, whose vineyard in Florin dates to the 1890s. Frasinetti's opened in 1936 and operated at the prominent corner of Stockton Boulevard and San Francisco Boulevard, the "main street" of the Colonial Heights subdivision, recognizable by its two rows of palm trees, accessible from the Stockton Boulevard streetcar line, which ran until 1946.

In 1954, Frasinetti's became Burich's, owned by the Jim Burich family. Burich was also the operator of a long-standing downtown Sacramento bar, the Equipoise Cafe near 4th and K Street, notorious as a site for underground gambling dens. Burich's was farther out into the county, and could have been a more "family-oriented" place given its location in a suburb--or maybe it was just that much farther from the prying eyes of police who worked the West End?




And glad to see the Frasinetti/Burich building has survived as well, although some remodeling over the years



wburg thanks so much for sharing, really enjoyed the post

The unheard history is very interesting as well, the underground gambling etc. The stuff you never hear in the normal history tours is always very cool to me and understand Sacramento has quite a history with that going back to prohibition and speakeasys

Very interesting stuff

Last edited by OutlawImages; Jan 25, 2015 at 11:15 PM.
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  #33  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2015, 1:17 AM
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Aviation legend Charles A. Lindbergh visited Sacramento more than 80 years ago

September 17, 1927 The Spirit of St Louis landed at Mather airbase while on the Guggenheim Tour



The famous plane at Mather field




On the evening of Lindbergh’s arrival, a banquet was held in his honor in the Florentine Room at the Hotel Senator on L Street, between 11th and 12th streets, just north of the state Capitol

Read more below


Huge thanks for permission to post this from Lance Armstrong and his informative article on this
http://www.valcomnews.com/?p=3259

Last edited by OutlawImages; Jan 25, 2015 at 11:18 PM.
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  #34  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2015, 9:16 PM
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Sacramento grid

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Here are a few Sacramento Bee articles about places of interest in Colonial Heights, along Stockton Boulevard. In 1940, a streetcar ran from 55th Street and 21st Avenue downtown via Stockton Boulevard, making Stockton a prime business street and Colonial Heights a popular suburb.
On this map, the grid of the Downtown section is straight North/South but in reality it is inclined North/East like Downtown Los Angeles. In L.A. that comes from the Spanish times. But how comes that in Sacramento ? I guess the section was empty in the Spanish times.
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  #35  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2015, 2:41 AM
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It parallels the sacramento river
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  #36  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2015, 6:13 PM
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Most likely, as Web said--it was laid out by American engineers in December 1848, but the method they used was very similar to that of Spanish colony planners, using a rectangular grid aligned with magnetic north. Magnetic north put Front Street parallel to the river, which probably facilitated the sale of the prime riverfront lots.
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  #37  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2015, 1:25 AM
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Here are some photos of the old passenger tracks we uncovered at the Sacramento Valley Station during construction




If you aren't following the progress thread, here is the website for the project
http://sacramentovalleystation.com/
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  #38  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2015, 7:19 PM
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Here are some photos of the old passenger tracks we uncovered at the Sacramento Valley Station during construction




If you aren't following the progress thread, here is the website for the project
http://sacramentovalleystation.com/

Interesting find right under our feet

Great post and thanks for the link I will follow your project over there as well

Appreciate the post and your sharing
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  #39  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2015, 3:06 AM
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Most old historic pics of Sacramento are by MCurry's. But there was also Harley Frederick who started with McCurry's at 15 yrs old and worked for 10 yrs till entering WWI

He started Frederick's Fotos at 916 1/2 7th in a 2 story building next to the D.O.Mills building (on the left of building)right after returning from WWI around 1920, Later moving to 718 1/2 J st


The building is gone now and is just a small parking lot unfortunately




Harley is still somewhat famous because of his early baseball cards. And especially a very very rare Babe Ruth card while he was still with the Red Sox in 1921

About this card
http://www.goodwinandco.com/extremel...-lot28308.aspx





A short story about some of his other cards

Last edited by OutlawImages; Jan 30, 2015 at 3:27 AM.
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  #40  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2015, 9:03 PM
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Interesting Foto!

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Most old historic pics of Sacramento are by MCurry's. But there was also Harley Frederick who started with McCurry's at 15 yrs old and worked for 10 yrs till entering WWI

He started Frederick's Fotos at 916 1/2 7th in a 2 story building next to the D.O.Mills building (on the left of building)right after returning from WWI around 1920, Later moving to 718 1/2 J st
Beautiful building. Something didn't look quite western american : the 5 windows of the second floor and the front roof. They look rather western european (XVIII/XIX centuries).
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