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  #41  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 9:30 PM
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[QUOTE=rocketphish;7919693]Updated timeline on construction in New Edinburgh

by Michelle Nash Baker, Ottawa East News
Sep 0
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  #42  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2017, 2:00 AM
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Sewage tunnel dig to begin later this fall under Kent Street
$232M project scheduled to be complete by 2020

CBC News
Posted: Oct 24, 2017 2:45 PM ET Last Updated: Oct 24, 2017 2:45 PM ET



A component of the tunnel boring machine is lowered down an access shaft at Kent Street and Chamberlain Avenue. Work to dig the tunnel from Chamberlain north to the Ottawa River is expected to be completed in the spring of 2018.

The City of Ottawa has reached an early milestone on its other major underground project — the sewage storage tunnels meant to keep sewage overflows from entering the Ottawa River.

The Combined Sewage Storage Tunnel is a $232.3-million project funded by all three levels of government, but it's been overshadowed by work on the multi-billion-dollar light-rail transit system.

Work began in June 2016 on an access shaft to the site of the future sewage tunnel at the intersection of Kent Street and Chamberlain Avenue.

The 23-metre deep shaft is now complete, and a tunnel boring machine is being assembled underground to start digging, the city said Tuesday.

That machine will work its way under Kent Street starting later this fall and surface behind the Supreme Court of Canada in the spring of 2018.


The access shaft below Kent Street and Chamberlain Avenue is where the tunnel boring machine will begin its work.

A second, inter-connected east-west tunnel will run through the downtown core, from Stanley Park to LeBreton Flats, generally under Cumberland and Slater streets.

The tunnels will be three metres in diameter and located 10 to 31 metres below surface level.

During major rainfalls the tunnels will hold up to 43 million litres of surface runoff and wastewater — as much as approximately 18 Olympic-sized pools. Once the rainfall subsides, the water will be treated before being returned to the river.

The tunnel is also being built to aid the city's drainage system, and the city said it's expected to reduce the risk of basement flooding in the downtown core.


The 250-metre-long tunnel boring machine has a rotating cutter wheel that chips away rock in various sizes, ranging from tiny gravel to fist-sized pieces, as the machine moves forward. Conveyors then take the pieces back to the shaft entrance to be taken away.

Sewage overflow has been a persistent problem for the Ottawa River for years, but it was particularly bad during this spring's record rainfall.

From May 5 to May 7, more than 430-million litres of sewage overflowed into the river, far more than the sewage tunnel could handle.

Work on building the sewage tunnel is scheduled to be complete in 2019, with the tunnel operational in 2020.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...reet-1.4369420
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  #43  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2017, 3:23 AM
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Note that the TBM is from Dragados, the same company that was subcontracted to excavate Ottawa's LTR tunnel

http://www.dragados-usa.com/exp_tinn...pe=Tunnel#tab2
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  #44  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2017, 1:46 PM
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Does anyone know if this is intended as the permanent fix for the mixed sewage problem or is it just a temporary solution until they can separate the separate the storm and sanitary sewers in the areas that they are combined?
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  #45  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2017, 3:53 PM
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Article from OBJ including a video from Front Page Media. Explains what's been going on at Chamberlain and Kent. They might as well dig a Bank Street LRT tunnel while they're at it since this is running parallel.

Quote:
Ottawa’s sewer tunnel boring machine readied for big dig

OBJ staff
PUBLISHED:
Oct 25, 2017 4:36pm EDT

Video Link


A giant rock-carving machine will soon be rumbling beneath city streets as a massive sewage storage tunnel takes shape.

The city said this week that the tunnel boring machine was being lowered into an access shaft at Chamberlain Avenue and Kent Street and will soon start grinding out the tunnel.

The machine will bore a two-kilometre tunnel underneath downtown Ottawa before emerging near the Supreme Court. Last year, the city awarded a construction contract to a joint venture of infrastructure firm Dragados and Ottawa heavy construction firm Tomlinson for the Combined Sewage Storage Tunnel project, which has a total price tag of $232.3 million.

Late in 2016, shovels first entered the ground to create an access shaft to make way for the tunnel boring machine, which will be 250 metres long once fully assembled and can chew through 20 to 25 metres of rock a day.

“The average citizen won’t know that the TBM is working underground,” said Paul McCarney, Tomlinson’s vice-president of business development, in a statement last year. “It will be literally like a mechanical mole working deep in the ground.”

He added that the machine cost in the neighbourhood of $7 million.

The overall project consists of two interconnected tunnels spanning a total of more than six kilometres, aimed at reducing the amount of raw sewage that’s dumped directly into the Ottawa River.

During heavy rainstorms, the tunnels will hold up to 43,000 cubic metres – the equivalent of 18 Olympic-sized swimming pools – of runoff and wastewater until it can be treated.
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  #46  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2017, 12:33 PM
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I noticed this morning that they've installed a 25 ton gantry crane over the Kent/Chamberlain tunnel access portal. There's going to be a lot of debris coming out of here over the next little while.
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  #47  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 2:36 PM
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Sewer construction to block off parts of Confederation Park, surrounding streets

Christian Paas-Lang, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: January 5, 2018 | Last Updated: January 5, 2018 6:30 PM EST


The construction of new sewage infrastructure in Confederation Park will cause temporary closures of adjacent traffic lanes and a portion of the park, starting in March.

Work to construct the Rideau Canal Interceptor Diversion Chamber is scheduled to continue until January 2019. It’s part of a larger city project, called the Combined Sewage Storage Tunnel, which seeks to reduce sewage overflows into the Ottawa River during heavy rainfall. The diversion chamber being built in Confederation Park will help push this project forward by diverting the flow of the current Rideau Canal Interceptor into the CSST system.

Steven Courtland, project manager for the CSST, said the work in the downtown park will “adhere to industry standards for mitigation of potential noise, dust and vibration,” and that “vehicle access to the National Arts Centre and cycling and pedestrian connectivity” will be maintained. Construction will take place in an approximately 1,400-square-metre area on the eastern side of the park.

The CSST is itself part of the Ottawa River Action Plan, which Courtland describes as “the City of Ottawa’s roadmap to protect the Ottawa River for future generations.” In addition to reducing overflow into the river, the CSST will, according to Courtland, lower the risk of flooding in homes in the Glebe and O’Connor area.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...unding-streets
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