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  #45461  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2019, 9:07 PM
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The problem is it’s self fulfilling. Restrict development, raise prices, make the neighborhood exclusive. The residents have more clout, restrict development further.
The instant residents try this crap, it goes exponential and what should be a thriving neighborhood becomes a rich enclave.

Or it becomes a neglected poor one.
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  #45462  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2019, 11:07 AM
marothisu marothisu is offline
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Anyone have an update/ recent pictures of the mega mall development in Logan Square?
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  #45463  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2019, 1:47 PM
wchicity wchicity is offline
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Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Anyone have an update/ recent pictures of the mega mall development in Logan Square?
Don't have any pictures, but walked by it the other day. It has a HUGE presence and definitely gives that block a completely different look and feel. I guess we'll see how the overall quality of the buildings turns out, but I think it's a massive improvement over the empty lot that was there before.
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  #45464  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2019, 8:58 PM
The Lurker The Lurker is offline
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I was in town this week and took a ton of photos but flickr is on the fritz so I'll be sharing links. I can't come up with a URL with a mobile device, but if anybody is able to, you are more than welcome to post the images. I'll be photo dumping for a good part of the day. Please click the links and enjoy.

Milwaukee Ave. Stuff:

https://flic.kr/p/2gnfgoD

https://flic.kr/p/2gnfejV

https://flic.kr/p/2gnfe5M

https://flic.kr/p/2gnfdGY

https://flic.kr/p/2gneMTd

https://flic.kr/p/2gnh4xX

Fulton Market stuff:

https://flic.kr/p/2gngeGg

https://flic.kr/p/2gnfPmB

https://flic.kr/p/2gnfP9x

That little gust front Thursday evening knocked down the fencing at 800 W. Fulton Market and gave us a peek in.

https://flic.kr/p/2gngeV7

https://flic.kr/p/2gnfWRX

Sears Tower reatail;

https://flic.kr/p/2gnhv9S

Gem's academy;

https://flic.kr/p/2gneQP3

1533 W. Warren, fencing around site and a few excavators I didn't get in the shot;

https://flic.kr/p/2gniu8b
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Last edited by The Lurker; Jun 29, 2019 at 10:21 PM.
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  #45465  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 2:25 AM
Stockerzzz Stockerzzz is offline
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Heartland Cafe Apartment Project Won’t Get Zoning Change — So Developer Is Killing Affordable Units

ROGERS PARK — New Rogers Park Ald. Maria Hadden said Wednesday she won’t support a zoning change for a six-story building at the site of the old Heartland Cafe, a decision that doesn’t stop the project but will kill a plan to add affordable housing in the building, the developer told Block Club Chicago.

Hadden (49th) said she decided to oppose the zoning change based on community feedback. Allowing the developer to build a taller building than the site currently allows would change the character of the area too much for too little in return, she said.

“After several meetings with the developer, our community input process, and much consultation with local and city zoning and planning experts, I have decided not to support the zoning change request for the development at 7000 N. Glenwood,” Hadden said in a statement Thursday.

Developer Sam Goldman proposed building a 70-foot-high, six-story apartment building with 60 units at 7000 N. Glenwood Ave. Without a zoning change, he said he can only build a 65-foot building with a smaller footprint, allowing for 30-40 units to be built at the site.

The initial plan called for six of the units to be affordable housing units. That’s the minimum required under the city’s Affordable Requirements Ordinance, which calls for 10 percent affordable units. Goldman could have built four units off site, but committed to doing all six in the building and keeping them affordable for 30 years.

But without a zoning change, he won’t be required by the city to build affordable housing. Facing decreased density, Goldman said he’s now removing the affordable units from the plan so the project can remain profitable.
https://blockclubchicago.org/2019/06...ordable-units/
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  #45466  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 4:14 AM
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Those genius community members and their "input"...

This is not how you build a city.
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  #45467  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 6:06 AM
JK47 JK47 is offline
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Originally Posted by Stockerzzz View Post

With the recent changes made by Lightfoot does the opposition of the Alderman for a ward still carry the same weight as before?
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  #45468  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 1:23 PM
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Yes, because a rezoning ordinance is passed by city council. A mayor can't change that with an executive order.
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  #45469  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 2:40 PM
Baronvonellis Baronvonellis is offline
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Haha, that's hilarious how she says she's working on a plan for affordable housing, while at the same time denying a plan to build some affordable housing!
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  #45470  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 2:53 PM
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Would not "preserving the character of the area" actually mean allowing people to build courtyard buildings with no parking and four plus ones wherever they want?

Of course we know that's not what this is about.
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  #45471  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 3:01 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is online now
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Originally Posted by Baronvonellis View Post
Haha, that's hilarious how she says she's working on a plan for affordable housing, while at the same time denying a plan to build some affordable housing!
What accelerates gentrification more?

a) A 30 unit building with no affordable units
b) A 60 unit building with 6 affordable units?

I'm sure it's up for debate, but I'd argue that (a) accelerates gentrification because it offers less supply. Fewer units, less supply, thus higher asking rents.

In my own apartments, despite a booming rental market, the fact that tenants have a lot of other choices forces me to charge less rent, and it's fairly often that one has to lower their asking price to finally land a tenant.

Supply and demand is still the best way to keep down costs...
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  #45472  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 4:00 PM
OrdoSeclorum OrdoSeclorum is offline
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Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
What accelerates gentrification more?

a) A 30 unit building with no affordable units
b) A 60 unit building with 6 affordable units?

I'm sure it's up for debate, but I'd argue that (a) accelerates gentrification because it offers less supply. Fewer units, less supply, thus higher asking rents.

In my own apartments, despite a booming rental market, the fact that tenants have a lot of other choices forces me to charge less rent, and it's fairly often that one has to lower their asking price to finally land a tenant.

Supply and demand is still the best way to keep down costs...
It's absolutely obvious that "a" does more to increase gentrification. And whenever I find myself in a disagreement on this topic, it feels like I'm arguing about how many sides a triangle has.

I think what's up for debate on this topic is what is the best way improve housing options for those with truly low incomes. Supply can do a lot to improve affordability for the lower middle class. But folks who--for a variety of reasons--may not ever have the ability to earn more than a janitor's wage, it's possible to imagine the market being unable to provide them housing in some cities with high wages and high land costs. I don't know what the best solution is.
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  #45473  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 4:48 PM
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Originally Posted by OrdoSeclorum View Post
It's absolutely obvious that "a" does more to increase gentrification. And whenever I find myself in a disagreement on this topic, it feels like I'm arguing about how many sides a triangle has.

I think what's up for debate on this topic is what is the best way improve housing options for those with truly low incomes. Supply can do a lot to improve affordability for the lower middle class. But folks who--for a variety of reasons--may not ever have the ability to earn more than a janitor's wage, it's possible to imagine the market being unable to provide them housing in some cities with high wages and high land costs. I don't know what the best solution is.
Best Option: Vouchers
2nd Best Option: Vouchers
Bottom Feeder Options: Everything else.

Vouchers are the only way to deliver housing for that type of individual without A: creating a bunch of perverse incentives B: costing the taxpayers more per unit than new construction housing intended for upper class consumers.
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  #45474  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 4:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
"colossal pain in the ass"?

i used to live near broadway in edgewater. i never had issues crossing broadway. walk to the corner, wait for the walk sign, and cross. kinda like every other major street crossing in the city (ashland, irving, western, etc.).

now, is broadway too much of an auto-sewer through there with too much auto-oriented commercial development (strip malls & drive-thrus)? yes, absolutely, but crossing broadway in its current state is not terribly difficult.
Admittedly, I was being dramatic--my choice of language reflects the accumulation of impatience from having to cross it for 5 years now. By the way, I'm specifically talking about the portion of Broadway from Hollywood north.

My belief is that, relatively speaking, yes, it is a pain in the ass. E-W crossings are woefully infrequent, and when they do arise, the allotted time is insufficient (if you're not queued at the crossing when the signal changes, you're not going to make it across with ease, and that's for a person with an able body at that).
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  #45475  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 5:46 PM
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3460 N. Broadway “Treasure Island Site”

From 44th Ward Alderman Tunney:
Quote:
"I will be hosting a meeting to discuss a proposed redevelopment of the Treasure Island site at 3460 N. Broadway. This meeting will be held on Thursday, July 11th, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the 19th District Police Station, 850 W. Addison. The development team will present their proposal, answer questions and take feedback from neighbors. Their presentation will be available on the 44th Ward website following the meeting. This is the first step in the community process and I look forward to a robust discussion."


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  #45476  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 6:08 PM
Freefall Freefall is offline
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Man, that's a big beautiful lot. I hope Tunney doesn't turn it into another Mariano's on broadway situation
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  #45477  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 6:22 PM
JK47 JK47 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiPlanner View Post
From 44th Ward Alderman Tunney:


I'm going to miss watching cars get towed from that lot. Despite all the signs in the lot and all the signs on adjacent buildings saying don't park there because you'll get towed I frequently see tow trucks hauling cars out of that lot.
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  #45478  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 6:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Jibba View Post
Admittedly, I was being dramatic--my choice of language reflects the accumulation of impatience from having to cross it for 5 years now. By the way, I'm specifically talking about the portion of Broadway from Hollywood north.

My belief is that, relatively speaking, yes, it is a pain in the ass. E-W crossings are woefully infrequent, and when they do arise, the allotted time is insufficient (if you're not queued at the crossing when the signal changes, you're not going to make it across with ease, and that's for a person with an able body at that).
i only lived over by there for 3.5 years (elmdale/glenwood), so maybe i didn't have enough time to get as jaded as you, but i still think you're being ridiculously over-dramatic.

between hollywood and devon, there are 6 signaled E-W crossings (not including hollywood and devon themselves), over a span of 4600', or one signaled crossing every 650' on average. that does not seem terribly unreasonable for such a major auto-sewer like broadway.

could the situation be improved for pedestrians? of course! there's ALWAYS room for improvement in our stupid-ass auto-centric society, but after living there for years, i never found broadway to be some kind if impenetrable barrier that some make it out to be. as i said earlier, it's nearly identical to crossing any other major 4 lane street on the northside (ashland, western, irving, etc.).
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  #45479  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 10:39 PM
LouisVanDerWright LouisVanDerWright is offline
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Originally Posted by Buckman821 View Post
Best Option: Vouchers
2nd Best Option: Vouchers
Bottom Feeder Options: Everything else.

Vouchers are the only way to deliver housing for that type of individual without A: creating a bunch of perverse incentives B: costing the taxpayers more per unit than new construction housing intended for upper class consumers.
Interestingly enough I literally just signed a lease with a fellow who works as a tenant placement specialist for CHA at one of my properties in Marshall Square (I'm done calling it LV after I was thoroughly internet chastized for calling it Little Village in that video a while back). The CHA just took over the old Nathaniel Pope Elementary that Rahm closed and renovated it into a Class A office building for their workers.

First of all he's a really interesting individual who was homeless 8 years ago and was picked up by Salvation Army and indoctrinated and is now a soldier or whatever they call themselves. They gave him shelter, then clean clothes, and then job training and he's been working at CHA for like 3 years now.

I could talk to this guy for hour about these topics, but he came right out and said he was shocked by the digs some of his clients land with vouchers. People paying $80 a month for $2,000 apartment in Wicker or Lincoln Park. Meanwhile he has been forced to live in Austin while he got his shit together in a $1200 a month apartment in a building full of transients where he had to watch TV at night laying on the floor because of the constant shootings. He seemed to think it was awfully unfair to people like him who have busted their ass "pulling themselves up by their own bootstraps" that others sit and live off vouchers their whole lives.

I'm sure there's tons of room for improvement in the system and I'll obviously be chatting my new tenant up about the topic whenever I run into him. But generally vouchers are the best thing we have, that and existing buildings in moderately depreciated condition. Just rented out another 2BD at Albany and Cermak for $800 for example. It's still got mostly double hung wood windows and space heaters for heat, but it's home.
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  #45480  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2019, 3:52 PM
Handro Handro is offline
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Originally Posted by LouisVanDerWright View Post
Interestingly enough I literally just signed a lease with a fellow who works as a tenant placement specialist for CHA at one of my properties in Marshall Square (I'm done calling it LV after I was thoroughly internet chastized for calling it Little Village in that video a while back). The CHA just took over the old Nathaniel Pope Elementary that Rahm closed and renovated it into a Class A office building for their workers.

First of all he's a really interesting individual who was homeless 8 years ago and was picked up by Salvation Army and indoctrinated and is now a soldier or whatever they call themselves. They gave him shelter, then clean clothes, and then job training and he's been working at CHA for like 3 years now.

I could talk to this guy for hour about these topics, but he came right out and said he was shocked by the digs some of his clients land with vouchers. People paying $80 a month for $2,000 apartment in Wicker or Lincoln Park. Meanwhile he has been forced to live in Austin while he got his shit together in a $1200 a month apartment in a building full of transients where he had to watch TV at night laying on the floor because of the constant shootings. He seemed to think it was awfully unfair to people like him who have busted their ass "pulling themselves up by their own bootstraps" that others sit and live off vouchers their whole lives.

I'm sure there's tons of room for improvement in the system and I'll obviously be chatting my new tenant up about the topic whenever I run into him. But generally vouchers are the best thing we have, that and existing buildings in moderately depreciated condition. Just rented out another 2BD at Albany and Cermak for $800 for example. It's still got mostly double hung wood windows and space heaters for heat, but it's home.
Anecdotal stories like this are useless. Have any concrete examples of people paying $80 to live in a $2,000 apartment in Lincoln or Wicker Park? Reminds me of the old Fox News stories about people with food stamps buying steak and lobster.
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