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  #961  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2019, 12:27 PM
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ns_kid ns_kid is offline
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Thanks for posting that, someone123. That is a marvelous photo of the North Street station. It is probably the best extant image of the structure.

While photos exist of the interior of the trainshed, I have searched for but have yet to find any photo taken inside the head house, such as the waiting room areas or offices. It would be fascinating to see how the building was laid out inside.
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  #962  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2019, 7:34 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Yeah, great photo. Looks like a higher-quality version of the photos posted on page 44 of this thread. It's nice in that you can even see some of the masonry detail of the building.

I too would love to see some interior photos of the station. I can't help but think that some must exist somewhere that just haven't seen the light of day in awhile...

I'm also intrigued by the similarities to the old Halifax Academy building, which was built around the same time period as the station...



https://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep...u.aspx?id=3896



https://novascotia.ca/archives/Notma...ves.asp?ID=969
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  #963  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2019, 9:56 PM
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Keith P. Keith P. is offline
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That use and style of masonry was apparently the reflective-glass window wall of its day.
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  #964  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2019, 10:02 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
That use and style of masonry was apparently the reflective-glass window wall of its day.
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  #965  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2019, 11:38 AM
IanWatson IanWatson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
That use and style of masonry was apparently the reflective-glass window wall of its day.
That's a pretty astute observation. It's what people don't understand when they grouse about, "all these new buildings being the same". That's the way it's always been. At any particular time there is one style that is overwhelming the choice for new construction, due to taste trends, technology, the type of skilled trades you have available, and regulations.
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  #966  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2019, 1:41 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by IanWatson View Post
That's a pretty astute observation. It's what people don't understand when they grouse about, "all these new buildings being the same". That's the way it's always been. At any particular time there is one style that is overwhelming the choice for new construction, due to taste trends, technology, the type of skilled trades you have available, and regulations.
Actually, I don't agree with that point.

While, yes, certain architectural trends were more popular in particular time periods (i.e. Victorian, Georgean, etc.), I think there was much more variation in buildings built during the same time periods.

I think this was possible because there was more handwork and craftmanship in the buildings in the 19th and early 20th centuries, thus allowing more one-off features. Presumably custom features like carved stonework were cheaper than it would be today, for example. I feel that there may have been more of a trend among architects to create distinctive work, but I can't confirm this.

The reason I pointed out the similarities between the North Street Station and the Academy was that I was surprised to see such similarities in two seemingly unrelated buildings from the late 19th century. Typically they would share certain design features, but not so many.

I don't think it is a fair comparison to say that glass walls with almost identical (except the colour) cladding is quite the same, but that's just my opinion of course.
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