HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Manitoba & Saskatchewan

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #321  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2018, 10:31 PM
optimusREIM's Avatar
optimusREIM optimusREIM is offline
There is always a way
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 963
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzg View Post
I'm just confused how a loading zone on Provencher connects to this development... whoever it's coming from. Why does the developer want it, why are residents against it? Is it just for construction?



That'd be nice. I'm still so surprised that Sparrow Hotels hasn't taken the Norwood up a tier, considering their other hotels are much nicer – Inn at the Forks and Mere, and they own Cibo.
This loading zone business seems trivial. My guess is it's just your run of the mill conservationist nimbys who will dream up any excuse to preserve the "character" of the neighbourhood, even if it means upholding the gravel parking lot status quo. Speaking of that lot, btw, I got stuck there last winter, so I have a special axe to grind against it. The sooner the better.

And yeah, that is strange. It would be great though, to have like a 6-8 floor building somewhere on Provencher - I can think of several candidate lots - that houses a hotel, even a chain would be great. It would be a huge coup for the area and would help raise its profile.

So much unrealised potential..... ugh!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #322  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2018, 10:46 PM
Tacheguy Tacheguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 790
the way I read this is that the locals don't want loading car entrances on Provencher. they want it at the back lane.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #323  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2018, 11:22 PM
buzzg buzzg is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 4,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tacheguy View Post
the way I read this is that the locals don't want loading car entrances on Provencher. they want it at the back lane.
This building is 2 blocks north of Provencher... there was never going to be an entrance there.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #324  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2018, 11:30 PM
Tacheguy Tacheguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 790
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzg View Post
This building is 2 blocks north of Provencher... there was never going to be an entrance there.
sorry. I was thinking of the other project by le garage.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #325  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2018, 6:21 AM
optimusREIM's Avatar
optimusREIM optimusREIM is offline
There is always a way
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tacheguy View Post
sorry. I was thinking of the other project by le garage.
It is. They talk about 3 projects in the article. It's literally says loading zone, makes no mentions on lanes or curb cuts. My guess is that it will just be one of those signs that says loading zone
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #326  
Old Posted Jun 10, 2018, 9:10 AM
Wpg_Guy's Avatar
Wpg_Guy Wpg_Guy is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 2,591
Quote:
Hello, is it brie you're looking for?
Storied cheese maker opens doors in Old St. Boniface
This City By: David Sanderson

Posted: 06/10/2018

Gouda things come to those who wait.

On May 1, 82 years after Bothwell Cheese was founded in New Bothwell by a group of area farmers, the internationally acclaimed cheese maker opened its inaugural standalone store in Winnipeg, at 136 Provencher Blvd.

"We’ve only been here a few weeks but we’re already drawing a fair amount of foot traffic to St. Boniface from The Forks, instead of the other way around," says Jean-Marc Champagne who co-owns Fromagerie Bothwell with Kevin Thomson, president of Bothwell Cheese, Canada’s largest independently run cheese producer. "Because the Bothwell name is so well-known already, we’re really hoping the shop is going to become an economic driver for this part of the city."

Champagne met Thomson in 2012 at a social function. The two became fast friends and not long thereafter, Champagne, who studied advertising at Université de Saint-Boniface, told Thomson he had a few "outside-the-box" marketing strategies to help promote his brand.

"He was totally open to what I had in mind and we ended up doing some super-fun stuff, including this crazy campsite crashers campaign, where we literally showed up at random campgrounds throughout the province, asking people who were barbecuing if they wanted some Bothwell cheese for their burgers or smokies," says Champagne, who can’t recall a time growing up when there wasn’t a block of Bothwell cheddar or marble cheese in his family’s crisper. (His mother is originally from Ste. Anne, a neck of the woods where "it’s Bothwell or nothing," he says with a chuckle.)

The notion for the retail store started to germinate about five years ago. After going back and forth on what a Bothwell specialty shop might look like, they spent the next while debating where an optimum setting for it would be. They eventually agreed on St. Boniface due to its central location, minutes from downtown.

Last August, they were strolling down Provencher Boulevard on their way to get a bite to eat when they spotted a for rent sign in the window of what had previously been the Soul Medicine Psychic Shoppe. Champagne called the number listed on the placard, informed the person who answered they were standing outside the property, and asked how long before he could join them.

"He brought us inside and even though it looked nothing like it does now, we could definitely see the potential," says Champagne, noting they struck a handshake deal that evening, and began renovating the 1,200-square-foot space, situated almost at the foot of the Esplanade Riel, on Sept. 1, 2017.

In February, Champagne and Thomson taped posters to the windows of their establishment, boldly announcing it as the future home of Fromagerie Bothwell. Within minutes, curious types began poking their head inside, to the point Champagne finally had to lock the door so his contracted workers could go about their chores, without being peppered every 10 minutes with queries about when the store was going to be up and running.

"We hosted a family-and-friends night on April 30, and tore the posters down first thing the next morning," he says. "Not a word of a lie, seconds after we were done removing them, people started filing into the store, telling us they were excited we were finally open for business."

Fromagerie Bothwell stocks more than 20 varieties of Bothwell cheese, in assorted sizes. Heck, if you have a large appetite — and $379 burning a hole in your pocket — you can even go home with a 19-kilogram block of cheese. (Yes, the person behind the counter will be happy to help you lug it to your vehicle.)

"Obviously, Bothwell cheese is available in tons of retail grocery stores, but there are always going to be a few things here you can’t buy anywhere else, such as our five-year-old cheddar," Champagne says. "Plus, because we have a commercial kitchen in the back, the goal is to become a test site for new products, where we can get real-time feedback from customers shopping in the store. We’re already thinking ahead to the next Festival (du Voyageur), when the plan is to come out with a cheese made with Caribou, which, if you’re not familiar, is kind of like fortified wine and is the official drink of Festival."

In addition to cheese, flavoured curds and a wide variety of licensed Bothwell merchandise such as clothing and cutting boards, the shop also stocks dozens of made-in-Manitoba products, among them Smak Dab mustard, Flora & Farmer jams, Gourmet Inspirations sauces and La Cocina tortilla chips.

"Personally speaking, that’s definitely been one of the best parts of this whole process, learning about all these fantastic things that are made right here in Manitoba," says Champagne, patting his tummy while admitting the last six months have been "fairly gluttonous," in the name of research. "Kevin and I wanted the store to have a year-round farmer’s market feel, so we’ve spent a lot of time going to pop-up markets or events like Third + Bird, to get a sense of what’s out there. Some of what we carry we were already familiar with — like breads and croissants from La Belle Baguette or butter from Notre Dame Creamery — but others, like Happy Dance Hummus and Dr. Beetroot ketchup, were completely new to us." (To go along with the store’s keep-it-local mantra, all the shelving at Fromagerie Bothwell was constructed out of reclaimed barn wood acquired from Manitoba farmsteads.)

With tourist season around the corner, Champagne fully expects to welcome a large number of out-of-towners who aren’t familiar with Bothwell Cheese’s storied past, or don’t know the company is a perennial champ at culinary competitions such as the British Empire Cheese Show. In case he’s not around when people start asking questions, he’s made sure all his staff members have gone on a guided tour of the plant in New Bothwell, where they were able to witness firsthand the amount of effort that goes into the finished product.

"It’s important they understand where the cheese we’re selling comes from, and get an appreciation for how it’s made. It’s also imperative they’re familiar with all our flavours, so when somebody says they’re in the mood for something different but aren’t quite sure what, they can offer suggestions," he says, adding samples are always available for anyone having a particularly tough time making up their mind.

One more thing; Champagne laughs and says, "yeah, who would have guessed, eh?" when asked about his store’s roof-mounted mascot, which, practically overnight, has become an udder celebrity in Winnipeg’s French Quarter.

"That was a fun promo to put on but even in our wildest dreams, we never thought it would go as viral as it did," he says, referring to the fromagerie’s name-the-cow contest, which resulted in the life-size bovine acquiring the tag Teemoo, after close to 90,000 people wheyed, er, weighed in via social media, from as far away as Finland and Australia. "We found her at Penner Farm Services in Blumenort, and it was a bit of a traffic-stopper to say the least, the day we rented a boom truck to get her up onto the roof."

Champagne acknowledges it was too bad Teemoo hadn’t been named yet, when her namesake, National Hockey League hall-of-famer Teemu Selanne flew to Winnipeg last month to cheer on the Jets in their second round playoff series versus the Nashville Predators. That said, he’s fairly certain the Finnish Flash will be back one day, at which point he’d only be too happy to introduce Teemu to Teemoo. And, if he’s famished, offer him a slice of cheese.

David Sanderson writes about Winnipeg-centric businesses and restaurants.

david.sanderson@freepress.mb.ca
https://www.winnipegfreepress.com/lo...485054463.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #327  
Old Posted Jun 10, 2018, 1:04 PM
Tacheguy Tacheguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 790
Their three and five year old cheddars are great. love the place.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #328  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2018, 4:05 AM
Boreal's Avatar
Boreal Boreal is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 1,563
I was unaware that there was cheese available for purchase in Manitoba that wasn't Bothwell . I hope it's a massive success for all involved.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #329  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2018, 4:34 AM
Wpg_Guy's Avatar
Wpg_Guy Wpg_Guy is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 2,591
Nice little history and look at the Bothwell operation
Focus Manitoba Video: https://globalnews.ca/video/3966292/bothwell-cheese

Bothwell Cheese has been around for more than 80 years. Now this Manitoba staple can be found across the country and its award winning products are being tasted more than ever before.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #330  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2018, 1:45 PM
wags_in_the_peg wags_in_the_peg is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 1,915
__________________
just an ordinary Prairie Boy who loves to be in the loop on what is going on
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #331  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2018, 1:56 PM
esquire's Avatar
esquire esquire is offline
Think about Winnipeg.
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 20,547
^ Very nice looking storefront!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #332  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2018, 2:52 PM
Ando Ando is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,035
I like the fact they named the cow TeeMoo.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #333  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2018, 2:58 PM
buzzg buzzg is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 4,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ando View Post
I like the fact they named the cow TeeMoo.
It was wearing a Jets jersey for the entire playoff run as well.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #334  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 5:40 PM
Tacheguy Tacheguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 790
Ironclad moving fast on their project. Demolition almost completed
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #335  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2018, 9:31 PM
vjose32 vjose32 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 537
Apparently councillor Matt Allard wants to reduce the amount of lanes on Provencher to one in each direction and force truck traffic on other unnamed routes (who cares what that does to traffic right?) and add rapid transit lanes. Not even sure how that's going to work. Is the rapid transit lane going to be between parked cars and the sidewalk or vice versa? Doesn't seem like a well thought out plan.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #336  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2018, 9:51 PM
Tacheguy Tacheguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 790
Quote:
Originally Posted by vjose32 View Post
Apparently councillor Matt Allard wants to reduce the amount of lanes on Provencher to one in each direction and force truck traffic on other unnamed routes (who cares what that does to traffic right?) and add rapid transit lanes. Not even sure how that's going to work. Is the rapid transit lane going to be between parked cars and the sidewalk or vice versa? Doesn't seem like a well thought out plan.
I would love that
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #337  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2018, 11:18 PM
buzzg buzzg is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 4,709
I think one lane in each direction is ridiculous, unless he means two lanes each way, with one being parking? Corydon is a great example of a 2-lane each way street that could work here. It's narrow, with parked cars, so it naturally calms speed.

There's a lot of room to work with on Provencher, so there's no reason why we can't comfortably and beautifully have calmed vehicle traffic, parking, bike lanes, nice sidewalks, and planting. While I normally would hate to lose trees – there's not many mature ones in good shape, we could move them.

One thing odd about Winnipeg is we seem obsessed with having street layouts centred and symmetrical. What if we kept the boulevard as is, made one lane EB into a two-way bike lane (to line up with Esplanade Riel), turned the median into a park-like setting, and widened the north sidewalk, or reconfigured parking? There's so much room on Provencher to get creative.

I've mentioned it before here but Minneapolis just re-did Nicolett Mall and it's amazing. They smartly put the road to one side (yes I know it's transit only) so that they could make one sidewalk extra large like a linear park, and then other side still has a more-than-adequate sidewalk. Why have two OK sidewalks when you can turn one side into something amazing, and still have a good one on the other?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #338  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2018, 7:31 PM
GEli GEli is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzg View Post
I think one lane in each direction is ridiculous, unless he means two lanes each way, with one being parking? Corydon is a great example of a 2-lane each way street that could work here. It's narrow, with parked cars, so it naturally calms speed.

There's a lot of room to work with on Provencher, so there's no reason why we can't comfortably and beautifully have calmed vehicle traffic, parking, bike lanes, nice sidewalks, and planting. While I normally would hate to lose trees – there's not many mature ones in good shape, we could move them.

One thing odd about Winnipeg is we seem obsessed with having street layouts centred and symmetrical. What if we kept the boulevard as is, made one lane EB into a two-way bike lane (to line up with Esplanade Riel), turned the median into a park-like setting, and widened the north sidewalk, or reconfigured parking? There's so much room on Provencher to get creative.

I've mentioned it before here but Minneapolis just re-did Nicolett Mall and it's amazing. They smartly put the road to one side (yes I know it's transit only) so that they could make one sidewalk extra large like a linear park, and then other side still has a more-than-adequate sidewalk. Why have two OK sidewalks when you can turn one side into something amazing, and still have a good one on the other?
Reading through his detailed announcement, two lanes with one for parking is what he's proposing. He references some of Winnipeg's other great streets (such as Corydon) as the inspiration.

I like the idea, but it's also partnered with running the new RT route through St B. I'm mixed about this. I'm split between concern that the new RT route won't be rapid if it's run down the median of Provencher and has all of the lights and stops associated with running through such a dense area. On the other hand, RT is only useful if it's where people can access it, so I'm not sure where this falls in the balancing act between putting the line near enough to the people that will use it while still making it a fast transit line. One benefit of the RT line would be the active transport path required to run alongside it, which would be a huge plus to St B.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #339  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2018, 8:02 PM
Wpg_Guy's Avatar
Wpg_Guy Wpg_Guy is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 2,591
I don’t get how it can be rapid going over the Provencher bridge during rush hour without it’s own dedicated right of way. It took almost an hour the other day to get from the forks over the bridge, between construction and a train it was hell
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #340  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2018, 1:58 AM
esquire's Avatar
esquire esquire is offline
Think about Winnipeg.
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 20,547
^ I have reservations about the Provencher BRT route too... to me it sounds more like the Glen Murray-era "quality corridors" than actual rapid transit. There is nothing "rapid" about a regular city bus plodding along in bumper to bumper rush hour traffic.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Manitoba & Saskatchewan
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 3:27 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.