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  #3021  
Old Posted May 15, 2018, 8:25 PM
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Originally Posted by wags_in_the_peg View Post
Mac's owner (Couche Tard) is rebranding all Mac's as Circle K
WHO YOU CALLIN A "couche tard"????
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  #3022  
Old Posted May 16, 2018, 12:20 AM
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Originally Posted by wags_in_the_peg View Post
Mac's owner (Couche Tard) is rebranding all Mac's as Circle K
The rebranding in Canada started about 1 year ago.
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  #3023  
Old Posted May 16, 2018, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by buzzg View Post
That seems odd – I thought 7-Eleven was taking over all the Esso convenience stores?
7-11 has bought out BC and Alberta locations. Alimentation Couche-Tard Inc (AKA MAC's) bought Ontario and Quebec. The news release I was looking at did not say who had bought out the Manitoba or Sask locations.

A few years ago a lot of the standalone Esso locations in Winnipeg were bought out by Pioneer Petroleum.

The C-store locations may be converting to unbranded ESSO gas retailers. Domo for years was selling Shell gas (as opposed to gas without the additional additives beyond the required govt ones). Same as Safeway with Shell before they rebranded into Shell stations.
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  #3024  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2018, 6:04 PM
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Depressing article in the CBC about the emerald ash borer:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manito...ipeg-1.4699623

Along with dutch elm, this is really going to change a lot of neighbourhoods. Here's a street in Ottawa in 2012:



And the exact same street four years later:

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  #3025  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 12:57 PM
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^yes, very bad news for Winnipeg. I’m curious how the city will decide which 1000 trees out of a possible 100,000 trees on public property will receive the treatment? That’s a drop in the bucket.
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  #3026  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 1:31 PM
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Honestly all this shows us, again, is that biodiversity is crucially important. We can’t beat nature. After Dutch Elm came, we didn’t say “hey lets start planting an array of species on the city” we said “hey let’s just switch to a different monoculture.”

Even many farmers are starting to grow multiple crops together (there’s precision machines that sort after harvest) because having biodiversity increases plants’ ability to fight pests and diseases.

Plus, it would look super nice having a mix of trees and shrubs on our bouldevards. The mix of species that were planted on John Hirsch is a good place to start.
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  #3027  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 5:53 PM
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^Couldn't agree more about biodiversity. You would think that we learned our lesson after DED, but the city went whole-hog into planting Green Ash over the past 30 or so years. Unfortunately, there are few tree species that are suitable for blvd plantings that can withstand our climate AND the rigors of salt and pollution. The city has actually gone back to planting a lot of Elm hybrids and cultivars that have DED resistance (not immunity, mind you), and some garden variety American Elms without resistance, because DED can be managed, but EAB cannot be.
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  #3028  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 6:17 PM
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This is a very interesting presentation on the topic:

http://www.jeffriesnurseries.com/eab_workshop17.pdf

They argue that for proper diversity we need 20 different tree genera, and there are only 18 available, and even fewer than that when you think about the challenges of urban trees.
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  #3029  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 6:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borkborkbork View Post
This is a very interesting presentation on the topic:

http://www.jeffriesnurseries.com/eab_workshop17.pdf

They argue that for proper diversity we need 20 different tree genera, and there are only 18 available, and even fewer than that when you think about the challenges of urban trees.
Though, couldn't this be mitigated by people planting a variety of trees on their own property? I assume it isn't enough diversity? I feel like peoples homes have a large variety of different trees on them.
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  #3030  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 6:34 PM
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Though, couldn't this be mitigated by people planting a variety of trees on their own property? I assume it isn't enough diversity? I feel like peoples homes have a large variety of different trees on them.
If I read the presentation right, the list of 18 *include* a bunch of trees that realistically will only be grown on private property (e.g. salt-sensitive, fruiting, small interfere with hydro lines, etc.) The list that make for suitable "boulevard trees" is much much smaller
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  #3031  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 6:35 PM
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^Great slideshow.
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  #3032  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 9:07 PM
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One of my friends had a large tree branch fall on her car last week and she found out that the city is almost 2000 trees behind on their tree trimming /removal program due to budget restrictions.
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  #3033  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 9:22 PM
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^ the lack of tree trimming is really unfortunate as IIRC, leaving dead branches on the elm trees just encourages DED to spread to an otherwise healthy tree.

It's a viscous cycle.

Delaying the trimming accelerates the spread of DED, which increases the number of trees that need to be cut down, which increases costs, reducing the money available for trimming, which accelerates the spread of DED, repeat.
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  #3034  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 9:29 PM
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I've lived in my current home for 8 years. The City had a contractor come by once a few years ago to trim. Other than that, I tend to the tree out front in the blvd to best of my abilities (even though it's illegal IIRC).

Someone mentioned previously it's a decade(s) long backlog because of funding. I don't climb up high, just trim the low sprouts. There is a dead branch up there for a couple years now. The trees didn't do so well this spring with the limited rain.
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  #3035  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2018, 10:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borkborkbork View Post
This is a very interesting presentation on the topic:

http://www.jeffriesnurseries.com/eab_workshop17.pdf

They argue that for proper diversity we need 20 different tree genera, and there are only 18 available, and even fewer than that when you think about the challenges of urban trees.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmacc View Post
Though, couldn't this be mitigated by people planting a variety of trees on their own property? I assume it isn't enough diversity? I feel like peoples homes have a large variety of different trees on them.
Interesting read. Diversity on private property definitely helps, and yes we are limited in amount of tree species that will work. However, especially on boulevards where there's lots of room, we should also be planting shrubs, bushes, native grasses and plants around our trees. Having these numerous extra species around our trees helps make the trees stronger, and can accept and fight viruses that don't affect them as they do the trees.


Quote:
Originally Posted by drew View Post
^ the lack of tree trimming is really unfortunate as IIRC, leaving dead branches on the elm trees just encourages DED to spread to an otherwise healthy tree.

It's a viscous cycle.

Delaying the trimming accelerates the spread of DED, which increases the number of trees that need to be cut down, which increases costs, reducing the money available for trimming, which accelerates the spread of DED, repeat.
Tree/bush trimming is also a significant issue along sidewalks and AT paths here – the AT path that runs along the west side of the red through Fort Garry/Riverview is only half usable. Same with sidewalks on St. Mary's.
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