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  #481  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2018, 3:22 PM
durandy durandy is offline
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Joey Coleman is covering the OMB appeals of the subdivision approval and ZBL amendments: https://www.thepublicrecord.ca/2018/...d-land-seller/

estatus here: http://www.omb.gov.on.ca/ecs/CaseDetail.aspx?n=PL170742
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  #482  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2018, 7:00 PM
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Oh god, isn't the OMB gone already?
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  #483  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2018, 8:15 PM
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these appeals came before the new LPAT
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  #484  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 4:09 PM
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Developer will pay Hamilton at least $41M for prime Pier 8 waterfront land
Waterfront Shores will be home to 1,292 condos, retail space, public parks and a promenade

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilt...ores-1.4705822

How much does it cost to buy a prime piece of waterfront land so you can build 1,300 condos on it? The answer: at least $41 million.

That's how much the Waterfront Shores consortium will pay the city between now and 2025 to buy Pier 8, where it will build 1,292 condos, as well as retail space. Although as it buys the land in blocks, it'll pay market value, so the city's final payday will likely be much higher.

But $41,258,843 is the initial figure city council approved Wednesday as it picked Waterfront Shores as the developer for Pier 8.

And with that, said Coun. Jason Farr, "a community is born where you couldn't get a bottle of water a decade ago."

Waterfront Shores will pay $2.5 million upfront, then the rest between 2019 and 2025. The largest payment will be in 2019-2020 with a minimum amount of $22,722,438.

At each of the four phases, the city will appraise the land, said Chris Phillips, the city's senior advisor on the project. The developer will pay more if the market value of the land has increased.

Once the buildings are completed, the developer will pay the city one per cent of the gross revenue.

The project itself dates back to 2000. That's when the city acquired Piers 7 and 8 as the result of a court battle with the federal government. But that settlement dictated the land stay in the hands of the Hamilton Port Authority.

The city tried for years to get its hands on the land, and approved the Setting Sail secondary plan, which caused dissent in the North End. In 2013, the port authority agreed to terminate the leases early and give the city control of the land.

Pier 8 is mostly empty right now, with notable exceptions like William's coffee pub, the Discovery Centre and a popular skating rink.

The new plan will see 1,292 condos in 20 separate buildings. Sixty-five of those units will be through Habitat for Humanity, fulfilling the demand for affordable housing, Phillips said.

The plans also include commercial space, themed retail zones for fitness and health, and a fresh food market.

Forty per cent of the land is public space, the city says. That includes a new waterfront promenade called "Hammer City," designed by Forrec Ltd. That design includes a beach, a games terrace, a cafe, and playground space, as well as "wetland remediation gardens."

The Waterfront Shores team includes architect Bruce Kuwabara of KPMB Architects, who is from Hamilton. It also includes Cityzen Development Corporation, Fernbrook Homes Group, GFL Environmental Inc. and Greybrook Realty Partners Inc.

This will be "a landmark city development," said Chris Phillips, the city's senior advisor on the project. And Wednesday's vote is "a major milestone."

"It's a long-term project," he said, "but this is a big deal today."
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  #485  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2018, 7:45 AM
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Should be a relatively nice boost to the tax base too. I can't imagine the city saw much revenue from the pier property over the past couple of decades.
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  #486  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2018, 3:04 AM
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  #487  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2018, 1:09 AM
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A landmark development for the city — and an architect
For Bruce Kuwabara, the lead architect on Hamilton’s Pier 8 redevelopment, his love for the city and its architecture runs deep

NEWS 07:42 PM by Emma Reilly The Hamilton Spectator
https://www.thespec.com/news-story/8...-an-architect/

When he was 10 years old, Bruce Kuwabara picked two books off a shelf at Hamilton's Central Library that changed his life.

The first was about the Parthenon and its architect, a sculptor named Phidias.

The second was a much smaller book, titled simply "So You Want to be an Architect."

"That's when it started," said Kuwabara, one of the founding partners of the Toronto firm Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects.

Kuwabara is the lead architect on the winning bid for the redevelopment of Pier 8 on the waterfront. Kuwabara and his team beat three other consortiums in a city-led design competition for the massive nine-block development project, which will see 1,300 condo units rise on the water's edge, along with commercial buildings, retail and community spaces.

It's a landmark development, both for Hamilton and for Kuwabara.

"It's a very, very important project for me," he said.

For Kuwabara, the project is an opportunity to transform an entire neighbourhood only blocks away from where he grew up. His parents, who travelled east after being interned during the Second World War, got off the train at Liuna Station after his father spotted a sign that read "labourers wanted." The Kuwabaras settled on Ferrie Street in a two-storey brick home — a building that Kuwabara describes as resembling a child's drawing.

Kuwabara's memories of his childhood home and riding his bike around the bay influenced his vision for Pier 8's transformation. Though Kuwabara now lives in Toronto with his wife, Victoria Jackman, and his two teenaged children, his deep understanding of Hamilton — both architecturally and geographically — informed his plans for Pier 8.

"They're going to be new, state-of-the-art, sustainable buildings — and they're not going to look like other buildings in Hamilton," he said. "But we kept talking about trying to keep everybody living on the ground, because that's the North End — it's a lot of low bungalows and very small cottages."

The Pier 8 site itself is unique: originally landfill, the prime piece of waterfront land now sits vacant, almost entirely covered in asphalt. To the east is a gritty industrial landscape, and to the west is the lush green treescape of the Burlington waterfront and Cootes Paradise.

"You get this knife edge between the industrial and the beauty of the natural — and that's Hamilton. That sort of dichotomy has always been there," he said.

The competition for the Pier 8 development was stiff. The City of Hamilton shortlisted four different consortiums for Pier 8, each of whom prepared elaborate presentations, designs and even profiles of would-be residents. The city, determined to create a waterfront where residents, visitors and retail could coexist, chose the winner in a top-secret process (the makeup of the 10-person selection team was confidential to prevent them from being influenced).

From the beginning, Kuwabara's design stood out as the most architecturally striking. Each of the 20 individual buildings in the development are designed to stand on their own but still operate as a cohesive whole. They're meant to appear somewhat nautical since, as Kuwabara points out, about 270 degrees of the site are surrounded by water.

"The buildings should not look like they're midtown — they should look like they're yearning to be out on the water," he said.

Kuwabara's design team incorporated an innovative design for the city-required green space, called "the Zipper," a greenway slicing through the site to connect with other pedestrian walkways and courtyards.

"We have a lot of fun when we're designing things," he said. "When we saw it, it was like an allegory of nature coming back into this asphalt surface and ripping itself open. There's a kind of fertility that gets expressed in the zipper."

Kuwabara credits his fascination with the relationship between Hamilton's natural world and architecture to John Lyle, the Hamilton architect who designed the High Level bridge, the Central Presbyterian Church and the Gage Park Fountain. Lyle, who grew up in Hamilton, went to France to study architecture and then returned to the city to design some of its most iconic architectural features.

"He was an architect who had been classically trained in Europe who came home to Canada, who was trying to adapt the principles of architecture that he had learned to the geography of Hamilton," he said. "All of his projects connected the water, the land, the escarpment and the sky."

Kuwabara points to the pylons on the High Level Bridge as an example of Lyle's interplay between geography and architecture: the pylons are so tall because they're meant to draw your eye up to the escarpment in the distance.

It's hard not to notice the parallels between Lyle and Kuwabara — both of whom grew up in Hamilton, left the city to study architecture and then returned to their hometowns to create iconic buildings.

Kuwabara's past projects include the Art Gallery of Hamilton and the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster, as well as the award-winning National Ballet School and the renovated Gardiner Museum in Toronto.

In 2011, Kuwabara was made an Officer of the Order of Canada "for his contributions, as an architect, to our built landscape and for his commitment to professional excellence." He is the recipient of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Gold Medal, the highest honour the institution can bestow.

Despite his years of experience, Kuwabara was insistent that due to the scope of the project, the Pier 8 design should be a collaborative process. He enlisted the help of three other architecture firms: Omar Gandhi Architect Inc., gh3* and Superkül.

As they worked on the design, Kuwabara and his team met every Friday for lunch to share ideas and hone their designs — a process that reminded him of being back in architecture school. Kuwabara likens the process to a rehearsing orchestra: he was the conductor, but everyone on the team had a sense of responsibility to each other and the overarching plan.

"One thing I knew for certain is that it would be virtually impossible for one architect to design all of these blocks and do a really good job. We put a premium on diversity, and differentiation — I don't want one block to look like the next block," he said.

"I just think it's really important that it's not just one slice of vision — it's multiple slices of vision. And that's what makes great cities."
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  #488  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2018, 1:10 AM
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  #489  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2018, 12:28 AM
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Bruce has been away far too long. Pronouncing it "Hamil-nnn" at 1:30. Former north-ender? Pshhh.

Regardless, this will be a game-changer when done.
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  #490  
Old Posted Sep 6, 2018, 1:24 PM
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So, according to https://www.hamilton.ca/city-initiat...promenade-park

February 2018: Project is released to tender
Spring 2018: Construction on the park begins
Spring 2019: Construction of the park expected to be complete

The Pier 8 park is supposed to begin construction by now, and be completed by the spring of 2018...

Have they in fact started in any meaningful way? I have been down there recently and don't see any signs of movement.
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  #491  
Old Posted Sep 6, 2018, 3:08 PM
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No construction. With the LPAT appeals of the development, they might have stalled the park construction, as it wouldn't surprise me if the two are linked, maybe due to engineering or legal reasons.
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  #492  
Old Posted Sep 6, 2018, 3:28 PM
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No construction. With the LPAT appeals of the development, they might have stalled the park construction, as it wouldn't surprise me if the two are linked, maybe due to engineering or legal reasons.
It seems some of the court dates are pretty far away, I suppose this means this entire project is on hold for like a year?
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  #493  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2018, 3:30 PM
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CHCH News regarding the stinky algae bloom in the bay. "The smell hits your nose as you drive closer to the waterfront and once you get to Pier 8, it’s overwhelming."

People are interviewed saying why would anyone pay for expensive condos at Pier 8 with such a stink.
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  #494  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2018, 3:56 PM
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CHCH News regarding the stinky algae bloom in the bay. "The smell hits your nose as you drive closer to the waterfront and once you get to Pier 8, it’s overwhelming."

People are interviewed saying why would anyone pay for expensive condos at Pier 8 with such a stink.
They always say stuff like this "NOBODY IS GOING TO BUY THESE" as if issues won't ever go away, plus with 3000 new people in the area attacking the city for these issues, it will get fixed up real quick.
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  #495  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2018, 9:18 PM
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Originally Posted by SteelTown View Post
Developer will pay Hamilton at least $41M for prime Pier 8 waterfront land
Waterfront Shores will be home to 1,292 condos, retail space, public parks and a promenade

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilt...ores-1.4705822

How much does it cost to buy a prime piece of waterfront land so you can build 1,300 condos on it? The answer: at least $41 million.

That's how much the Waterfront Shores consortium will pay the city between now and 2025 to buy Pier 8, where it will build 1,292 condos, as well as retail space. Although as it buys the land in blocks, it'll pay market value, so the city's final payday will likely be much higher.

But $41,258,843 is the initial figure city council approved Wednesday as it picked Waterfront Shores as the developer for Pier 8.

And with that, said Coun. Jason Farr, "a community is born where you couldn't get a bottle of water a decade ago."

Waterfront Shores will pay $2.5 million upfront, then the rest between 2019 and 2025. The largest payment will be in 2019-2020 with a minimum amount of $22,722,438.

At each of the four phases, the city will appraise the land, said Chris Phillips, the city's senior advisor on the project. The developer will pay more if the market value of the land has increased.

Once the buildings are completed, the developer will pay the city one per cent of the gross revenue.

The project itself dates back to 2000. That's when the city acquired Piers 7 and 8 as the result of a court battle with the federal government. But that settlement dictated the land stay in the hands of the Hamilton Port Authority.

The city tried for years to get its hands on the land, and approved the Setting Sail secondary plan, which caused dissent in the North End. In 2013, the port authority agreed to terminate the leases early and give the city control of the land.

Pier 8 is mostly empty right now, with notable exceptions like William's coffee pub, the Discovery Centre and a popular skating rink.

The new plan will see 1,292 condos in 20 separate buildings. Sixty-five of those units will be through Habitat for Humanity, fulfilling the demand for affordable housing, Phillips said.

The plans also include commercial space, themed retail zones for fitness and health, and a fresh food market.

Forty per cent of the land is public space, the city says. That includes a new waterfront promenade called "Hammer City," designed by Forrec Ltd. That design includes a beach, a games terrace, a cafe, and playground space, as well as "wetland remediation gardens."

The Waterfront Shores team includes architect Bruce Kuwabara of KPMB Architects, who is from Hamilton. It also includes Cityzen Development Corporation, Fernbrook Homes Group, GFL Environmental Inc. and Greybrook Realty Partners Inc.

This will be "a landmark city development," said Chris Phillips, the city's senior advisor on the project. And Wednesday's vote is "a major milestone."

"It's a long-term project," he said, "but this is a big deal today."

Would be great if between the City (for perimeter park) and Developer Consortium (for multiple condo buildings), we could see a monthly newsletter on progress and upcoming milestones.
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  #496  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2018, 2:31 PM
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Would be great if between the City (for perimeter park) and Developer Consortium (for multiple condo buildings), we could see a monthly newsletter on progress and upcoming milestones.
The project is currently at the OMB, so there won't be any updates until that situation finally gets resolved. Hopefully soon.
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  #497  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2018, 4:29 PM
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One would think basic infrastructure could move ahead , establishment of streets , etc.. Can't see how industry could impact strategic intent of plan. Suppose possible, but there should be as much pressure and support (think pro LRT) to get this moving along.
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  #498  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2018, 4:54 PM
hamilton23 hamilton23 is offline
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One would think basic infrastructure could move ahead , establishment of streets , etc.. Can't see how industry could impact strategic intent of plan. Suppose possible, but there should be as much pressure and support (think pro LRT) to get this moving along.
100% right. This will definitely be moving ahead. It's just a question of when at this point.
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  #499  
Old Posted Nov 3, 2018, 9:18 PM
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  #500  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2018, 12:31 AM
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Copps Pier?

I have nothing against the Copps family: Vic, Geraldine, Shelia, sure. If you think politics is important, then you can safely argue that they contributed a fair bit to Hamilton and the country. I just don't think it's that important. I mean, must everything be political?

How about just calling it Pier 8 or the Pier or the Pier Promenade?
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